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TOWN OF IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 
2001 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 




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SENIOR (Willi 
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BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Seated (1-r) James R. Engel (Chairman) , James W. Foley 

Standing (1-r) Eugene A. Hailson, Harry Lampropoulos 

Not pictured is Patrick J. McNally 



Cover photos courtesy of Elizabeth Dorman 



ANNUAL REPORT 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

2001 




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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Roster of Town Officials and Committees 3 

April 2, 2001 Annual Town Meeting 7 

Operating Budget 13 

October 15, 2001 Special Town Meeting 33 

Board of Selectmen 90 

Town Manager 93 

Department of Public Safety 95 

Police Department 95 

Fire Department 9 6 

Animal Control 98 

Harbors 99 

Shellfish 101 

Emergency Management 102 

Department of Public Works 103 

Public Works Divisions 103 

Cemeteries/Parks Department 106 

Solid Waste Advisory Committee 106 

Department of Code Enforcement 108 

Building Department 108 

Health Department 109 

Zoning Board of Appeals 110 

Department of Planning and Development Ill 

Planning Board 113 

Conservation Commission 114 

Historical Commission 117 

Housing Partnership 119 

Department of Human Services 119 

Recreation Department 119 

Youth Services 121 

Council on Aging 123 

Department of Utilities 125 

Electric Department 125 

Water Division 126 

Wastewater Treatment 12 7 

Finance Department 128 

Accounting Office 128 

Treasurer/Collector 129 

Assessors Office 129 

Town Clerk 130 

Elections and Registrations 134 

MIS Department 13 6 

Purchasing/Budget/Risk Management 137 

Ipswich Public Library 138 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED) 

School Department 140 

Ipswich Housing Authority 155 

Ipswich Cultural Council 155 

Open Space Committee 156 

Hall-Haskell House Standing Committee 157 

Ipswich Bay Circuit Committee 158 

Cable Emergency Room Advisory Committee 159 

Waterways Advisory Committee 161 

Trust Fund Commission 161 

Town of Ipswich Americans With Disabilities Act 163 

Financial Statements-Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2001. .. 165 



2001-2002 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James Engel,Ch 2004 E2 
Eugene Hailson 2002 
Harry Lampropoulos 2004 
Patrick McNally 2002 
James Foley 2003 03 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Elected at Town Meeting 



E SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joan Arsenault,Ch 
Edmund Traverso 
Norman Sheppard 
Margot Sherwood 
Deborah Henry 
Jeffrey Loeb 
Barry Hopping 

E CONSTABLE 

Peter Dziadose 

E TOWN MODERATOR 

A. James Grimes 



2004 
2002 
2002 
2003 
2003 
2004 
2002 



2002 



2002 



Ellen Rose 


2002 


Mary Harrington 


2003 


George Markos, Ch 


2004 


Appointed by Modera 


tor 


Jamie Fay 


2002 


William Craft 


2003 


Clark Ziegler 


2004 


Appointed by Selectmen 


John Bruni 


2002 


Joni Soffron 


2003 


Raymond Morley 


2004 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 




Kenneth Blades, Ch 


2003 


Tone Kenney 


2006 


Robert Como 


2006 


Sara O'Connor 


2004 


State Rep. (vacant) 





APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 



S TOWN MANAGER M 

George E. Howe 
SI FINANCE DIR./TOWN ACCT. 

Rita Negri Ml 

SI UTILITIES DEPT. DIRECTOR 

Tim Henry Ml 

SI TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Virginia Cleary Ml 

Ml ELECTRIC DEPT. MANAGER 

Raymond Shockey Ml 

Ml ASSESSOR 

Frank Ragonese Ml 

Ml CODE INFORCEMENT 

BUILDING INSPECTOR M 

James Sperber 

David Vines, Associate M 
Ml DIRECTOR OF PLANNING 

TOWN PLANNER M 

Glenn Gibbs 



HARBORMASTER 

Charles Surpitski 

Charles Schwartz, Deputy 

HEALTH AGENT 

Colleen Fermon 

LIBRARIAN 

Victor Dyer 

RECREATION DIRECTOR 

Elizabeth Dorman 

TOWN CLERK 

Frances Richards 

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 

Robert Gravino 

FIRE CHIEF 

Henry Michalski 

CEMETERIES/PARKS DEPT. 

James Graff urn 

COUNCIL ON AGING DIRECT. 

Diane Mitchell 



Ml DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC 

SAFETY, POLICE CHIEF 

Charles Surpitski 
Ml PARKING CLERK 

Susan LeMieux 



M SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Philip Kent 
7 SUPERINTEND' T OF SCHOOLS 

Richard Korb 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



M CEMETERIES AND PARKS 
COMMISSION 

Arthur Sotis, Ch 2003 
Nicholas Markos 2003 
Theodore LeMieux 2004 

M CIVIL DEFENSE /EMERGENCY 
MANAGEMENT 
John Poirier 2002 

S COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
Dorcas Rice 2002 
Joseph Carlin 2002 
Robert Waldner 2002 

M6 CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
David Pancoast, Agent 



Glenn Wood 


2002 


Ed Dick 


2002 


David Standley 


2003 


Sandra Hamilton 


2003 


Jennifer Hughes 


2003 


Mary Capkanis 


2004 


Ann McMenemy 


2004 


Lillian North (Assoc.) 


FAIR HOUSING 




George Howe 


2002 


Sara O'Connor 


2002 


Tone Kenney 


2002 


COUNCIL ON AGING 




Elizabeth Nelson 


2002 


Marion Sokolov 


2002 


Virginia Baisley 


2003 


Carol Emerson-Owen 


2003 


Stephen Markos 


2004 


Cynthia Burns 


2004 


Frederick Ruzanski 


2004 


Wilma Gooby 


2002 


June Gahan 


2003 


Marjorie Robie 


2004 


Robert Simmons 


2004 



M6 



IPSWICH CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Elizabeth Loudon 2002 
Coco McCabe 2002 
Janet Taisey-Craft 2002 
Laurie Miles 2003 
Linnea Duff 2003 
Thorpe Feidt 2004 
Miranda Updike 2003 
Philippa Melhuish 2003 
Dorothy Laurence 2004 
Tabatha Koger-Bradley2004 
Priscilla Herrington 2004 
LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Robert Weatherall 2002 
Lawrence Pszenny 2002 
Marie Schudder 2002 
Ann Brown 2 003 

George Gray 2003 
Philip Kuhn 200 
William Thoen 2004 
Marion Frost 2004 
TRUST FUND COMMISSION 
Edward Michon 2002 
Jean Emerson 2003 
Robert Weatherall 2004 
GOVERNMENT STUDY COM. 
Bessie Viator 2002 
HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Walter Pojasek 2003 
John Moss 2002 

Peter Lampropoulos 2003 



M MAPC REPRESENTATIVE 

Ingrid Miles 2002 
S REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Orville Giddings, Sr . 2002 

Robert Stone 2003 

Philip Grenier 2004 

S SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 

Wayne Castonguay 2002 

David Swicker,Ch 2002 

James Sotiropoulos 2002 

John Pelletier 2002 

Evan Parker 2002 

Michael Lambros 2002 

Brenda Turner 2002 

Frank Michon 2002 

Joseph Kmiec 2002 

Anthony Murawski 2002 

M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Frank Ragonese 2002 

John Moberger 2003 

Karen Rassias 2002 

S WATERWAYS ADVISORY COM. 

Ken Spellman,Ch 2003 

Ken Trocki 2003 

David Smith 2004 

Ronald Cameron 2002 

John Wigglesworth 2004 

Elton McCausland 2004 

Evan Parker 2002 

M PLANNING BOARD 

Charles Allen 2002 

Robert Weatherall 2005 

Michael Ryan 2006 

Leslie Brooks, Ch 2003 

Joshua Massey 2004 
David Santomenna 

Associate 2003 

S ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Keith Hughes 2002 

Arthur Sotis 2004 

David Mollica 2002 

Richard Alfoni 2006 

Robert Gambale 2003 

Kevin Lombard (Alt. ) 2002 

Roger LeBlanc (Alt . ) 2002 

3 OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

James Allen 2002 



03 HALL- HASKELL HOUSE COM. 

Vivian Endicott 2002 
Theresa Stephens 2002 
Peg Burr 2002 

William Thoen 2002 
Stephanie Gaskins 2002 
Margaret Broekel 2002 
Joyce Harrington 2002 
Ed Sukach 2002 

M BOARD OF HEALTH 

Carl Hiltunen 2002 
Kenneth Zinn, MD 2003 
Susan Hubbard 2004 

M RECREATION 

Jane Martone 2002 
Bruce Bryant 2003 
Judd Daly 2003 

Debra Boufford 2003 
Linda Murphy 2004 
Jennifer Wile 2004 
Michael Wolnik 2004 

S COASTAL POLLUTION CONTROL 
Michael Schaff 2002 
Aldyth Innis 2002 
Wayne Castonguay, Ch 2002 
Ingrid Miles 2002 

S SANDY POINT ADVISORY 

Diane Avelis 2002 
Joseph Parks 2002 

M IPSWICH BAY CIRCUIT 

Lawrence Eliot 2002 

S INDUSTRIAL DEVEL. FINANCE 
James Lahar 2004 
George Howe 2006 

M CABLE E.R. ADVISORY COM. 
Mark Coltin,Ch 2002 
Margaret Whittier 2002 
Elaine Lee 2002 

Clark Ziegler 2002 
James Muench 2002 
Peter Dziadose 2002 
Charles Surpitski 2002 
G. William Brenizer 2002 



Lawrence Eliot 2002 

Carl Nylen 2002 

Glenn Hazelton,Ch 2002 

William Wells 2002 

Ruth Sherwood 2002 

David Standley 2002 

Carolyn Britt 2002 
S CABLE TELEVISION ADVIS. 

George Howe 2002 

Susan Boice 2002 

Arthur Savage 

Stephen Harris 
M MOSQUITO CONTROL ADV] 

Daniel Deren 

Lisa Galanis 

Ian Forman, Ch 

Ed Ruta 

Ernest Brockelbank 

Ann Wallace 

Robert Gambale 

Reta Pelletier 
S HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

James Haskell 

Raymond Daniels 

Donald Gill 

Donald Greenough 

Edward Dick 

Karen Wallen 

William Gallagher 



SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COM 

James Temple, Ch 2002 

Winthrop Snow, Jr. 2002 

Elizabeth Krafchuk 2002 
ACTION, INC. 

Tone Kenney 2002 

Charlotte Dodge 2002 



2002 


E 


= 


Elected 


2002 


S 


= 


Appointed by Board of 


r IS. 






Selectmen 


2002 


M 


= 


Appointed by Town 


2002 






Manager 


2002 





= 


Other 


2002 


1 


= 


Supervised by Town 


2002 






Manager 


2002 


2 


= 


Elected at Town Meeting 


2002 


3 


= 


Appointed by Moderator 


2002 


4 


= 


General Laws 




5 


= 


1976 STM, Article II 


2002 


6 


= 


Confirmed by Board of 


2002 






Selectmen 


2002 


7 


= 


Appointed by School 


2002 






Committee 


2002 








2002 








2002 









2001 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to notify 
the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet in the 
Performing Arts Center of the IPSWICH MIDDLE SCf IOOL/IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, 
134 High Street in said Ipswich, on MONDAY, THE SECOND OF APRIL, 2001. at 7:30 
o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called the 368 th Annual Town Meeting to order at 7:45 p.m. 
with more than 200 voters present. There were 249 voters present at 7:30 p.m. and 
the final count was 570 at 9:00 p.m. Richard Korb. Superintendent of Schools, led 
the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. Moderator Grimes informed the voters about town 
meeting procedures; printed copies of the procedures were available at the door. 
Tellers appointed by the Moderator were: James DiFazio, Jeanne Parker and Pat 
Beirne. Deborah Eliason from Kopelman and Paige was Town Counsel. It was 
moved, seconded and so voted to admit non-voters. 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town 
Officers; (2) to choose the following officers, viz: Constable for one [1] year; Moderator 
for one [1] year; two [2] Selectmen for three [3] years; one [1] member of the Housing 
Authority for five [5] years; two [2] members of the School Committee for three [3] 
years; the above officers, to be voted on one ballot at the YMCA Hall, County Road; on 
Tuesday. April 10, 2001; the polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and shall close at 8:00 
p.m.; (3) to act on the transfer of any surplus funds in the Electric Division, 
Department of Utilities; and (4) to close out the remaining balances in the wastewater 
treatment capital project appropriations authorized under Article 15 of the April 03, 
1995, Annual Town Meeting and under Article 10 of the April 07, 1997, Annual Town 
Meeting, and to utilize the remaining proceeds for reduction of sewer debt; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote: (1) to fix the salary and 
compensation of all elected Town Officers as presented in the town and school 
operating budgets; (2) to choose the following officers, viz: Constable for one [1] year; 
Moderator for one [1] year; two [2] Selectmen for three [3] years; one [1] member of the 
Housing Authority for five [5] years; two [2] members of the School Committee for three 
[3] years; the above officers to be voted on one ballot at the YMCA Gymnasium, 110 
County Road; on TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2001; the polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and 
shall close at 8:00 p.m.; (3) to transfer $209,250 from surplus funds in the Electric 
Division, Department of Utilities to reduce taxes; and (4) to rescind the balance of 
borrowing authorized but unissued under Article 10 of the April 07, 1997, Annual 
Town Meeting ($40,000) and to close out the remaining balances in the wastewater 
treatment capital project appropriations authorized under Article 15 of the April 03, 
1995. Annual Town Meeting ($38,353.25) and under Article 10 of the April 07. 1997, 



Annual Town Meeting ($40,078.58), and to utilize the remaining proceeds for 
reduction of sewer debt. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to choose one member of the Finance Committee for three 
[3] years. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Finance Committee Chairman Mary Harrington moved that the Town elect George 
Markos to the Finance Committee for a term of three (3) years. Seconded. Mrs. 
Harrington spoke for and urged support for George Markos. It was moved, seconded 
and so voted to close the nominations. Motion to elect George Markos to the Finance 
Committee carried by a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to amend its action taken under Article 8 of the April 3, 
2000, Annual Town Meeting (the FY01 Municipal Operating Budget), as amended by 
Article 1 of the October 16, 2000 Special Town Meeting, by transferring sums of 
money between departmental accounts, and/or by consolidating categories within 
departmental accounts, the total appropriation to remain the same as previously 
appropriated as a result of these transfers and/or consolidations; and (2) to close out 
the remaining balance of the appropriation authorized under Article 13 of the April 7, 
1997 Annual Town Meeting (Fire Barn) and to apply said balance to offset an increase 
in the FY01 Municipal Operating Budget; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote: to amend its action taken 
under Article 8 of the April 3, 2000, Annual Town Meeting (the FY01 Municipal 
Operating Budget), as amended by Article 1 of the October 16, 2000, Special Town 
Meeting, by transferring sums of money between departmental accounts, and/or by 
consolidating categories within departmental accounts, the total appropriation to 
remain the same as previously appropriated as a result of these transfers and/or 
consolidations, as indicated: 



1. (Police Contract)— amend accounts as follows : 

a) Police Salaries & Wages 

b) Elections Salaries & Wages 

c) Highway Salaries & Wages 

d) Recreation Salaries & Wages 

e) Misc. Finance Salary Transfer Acct. 

f) Misc. Finance Retirement Acct. 

g) Reserve Fund 
h) Revenue Offset: (encumbered FY00 S.T.A. funds) 



From: 


To: 


$1,409,780 


$1,464,391 


17,597 


17,997 


307,305 


308,475 


99,542 


99,590 


23,759 





506,294 


494,263 


78,266 


57,827 



46,194 



2. Police Department (housekeeping change) 

a) Salaries and Wages 

b) Capital Outlay 

3. Fire Department (salary account) 

a) Fire Department Salaries 

b) Shellfish Department Salaries 

4. Reserve Fund 

a) Reserve Fund 

b) Assessors Capital Outlay 

c) Misc. Fin. (091) Training 

d) Highway Capital 

e) Veterans Expense 

f) Miscellaneous Finance (Insurance) 

5. Library (housekeeping change) 

a) Salaries and Wages 

b) Expenses 

c) Capital Outlay 

6. Planning (housekeeping change) 

a) Conservation Commission salaries 

b) Planning Board salaries 

so that the total municipal operating budget, as so amended and inclusive of override 

debt service shall total: $9,764,550 

offset by revenues totaling: 850,953 

leaving a net to be raised and assessed $8,913,597 

Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 

carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to appropriate sums of money in addition to the sums 
already having been appropriated under Article 12 of the April 3, 2000, Annual Town 
Meeting and Article 2 of the October 16, 2000, Special Town Meeting (the FY01 Water 
and Sewer Division Budgets), said sums to be raised by transferring equal sums, 
respectively, from water and sewer surplus; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under 
Article 12 of the April 03, 2000, Annual Town Meeting (the FY2001 Water and Sewer 
Budgets) as amended by Article 1 of the October 16, 2000, Special Town Meeting, by 



1,464,391 
167,400 


1,475,391 
156,400 


995,846 
40,130 


998,246 
37,730 


57,827 

3,600 

5,700 

150.000 

57.000 

148,122 


84,267 

3,395 

3,700 

149,765 

48,000 

133.122 


305,260 

129,153 

14,600 


292.960 

133.153 

22,900 


49,387 
88,958 


48,387 
89,958 



increasing the Water Budget appropriation by $10,000. (from $1,641,634 to 
$1,651,634) and to raise this appropriation by transferring from available funds (water 
surplus) $10,000. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Articles 1 1 and 12 of the 
April 05, 1999, Annual Town Meeting (School Capital Projects and Debt Service, and 
the FY2000 School Budget, respectively), the latter as amended by Article 22 of the 
October 18, 1999, Special Town Meeting, by increasing the appropriations there- 
under, and to transfer an equal sum from available funds for said purposes; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: School Committee) 

School Committee member Norman Sheppard moved that action on this article be 
postponed indefinitely. Seconded. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to re-authorize the revolving fund established under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53E x /2 for Building Department 
permit revenues (net of plumbing and gas fees) collected in excess of $105,000, the 
purpose of said fund being to finance additional part-time help in the Building 
Department and to pay related expenditures; and (2) to determine that no more than 
$10,000 may be expended by the Building Department in FY02 from such excess 
funds transferred into such revolving fund; and (2) to establish under Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53EV2 a new revolving fund for Council on Aging 
activity fees, the use of said fund to be to pay for special activities, expendable 
supplies and/or part-time wages, and to determine that no more than $10,000 may be 
expended by the Council on Aging from monies transferred into said fund during 
FY02; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Council on Aging) 

Selectman Eugene Hailson moved that the Town vote: (1) to continue a revolving fund 
under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53EV6 into which to deposit 
Building Department permit revenues (net of plumbing and gas permit fees) collected 
in excess of $105,000, to fund additional part-time help in the Building Department 
and to pay expenditures related thereto, and to determine that the total of $10,000 
may be expended by the Building Department in FY02 from such excess funds 
transferred into such Building Department revoking fund; and (2) to establish under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53EV2 a new revolving fund for 
Council on Aging activity fees, the use of said fund to be to pay for special activities, 
expendable supplies and /or part-time wages, and to determine that no more than 
$10,000 may be expended by the Council on Aging from monies transferred into said 
fund. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

10 



ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from available funds to pay 
unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Eugene Hailson moved that the Town vote: (1) to appropriate the sum of 
$10,018.08 to pay bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 

Town Manager Expenses : 

Bennett Associates (Fire Chief Recruitment-Advertising) $ 509.30 

School Department : 

Keyspan (final HS gas bill) 455.74 

Ipswich Electric Division 2,520. 14 

Middleton Glass Co. of Ipswich 372.50 

Highway Department 

Ipswich Electric Division 1,222.88 

Police Department : 

Outside Detail Revolving Fund Deficit (to be pursued civilly) 4.937.52 

$10,018.08 

(2) to raise this appropriation by transferring the sum of $10,018.08 from free cash. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. The voice 
vote on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count with one voting against and 
five voting in favor, the Moderator declared the motion passed by the 4/5 majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative to the municipal 
budget, and to raise, appropriate, transfer money from available funds, and change 
the purpose of the unexpended balances of prior appropriations, all to be used for the 
ensuing year's operations, including the compensation of elected Town Officers; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Finance Committee Chairman Mary Harrington moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of ($10,127,249) for the purposes indicated in the 

FY02 Municipal Operating Budget as outlined in the Finance Comrnittee Report, and 

that: 

for the FY02 Municipal Operating Budget of $10, 127,249 

the town transfer from available funds: 

Free Cash 381,951 



11 



Free Cash (restricted revenue - Library) 7,221 

Plum Island National Wildlife Refuge In Lieu of Taxes 22, 194 

Wetlands Protection Fund (Offset Conservation Commission) 9.593 

Cemetery Sale of Lots Fund (Offset Cemetery Capital) 8,000 

Lottery Fund Additional Distribution 52,471 

Overlay Surplus 67,500 

Library Construction Grant 60,300 

$ 609,230 

Leaving a net to be raised and assessed of: $ 9,518,019 
and 

2) to raise and appropriate: 

For Override Debt Service : 311,873 

For a Total Appropriation of: SIO.439,122 

And a Net to be Raised and Assessed: $ 9,829,892 

Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money for debt service 
payments and other costs related to the construction and furnishing of the new middle 
school and high school including, without limitation, moving expenses and expenses 
necessary to secure the former Whipple Middle School: and (2) to determine whether 
said appropriation shall be raised by taxes, by transfer from available funds, or 
otherwise: or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: School 
Committee) 

School Committee Chairman Jeffrey Loeb moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $2,559,253 for FY02 debt service payments related to the 
construction and furnishing of the new middle school and high school. Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 10 

To hear and act upon the reports of the Finance Committee and of the School 
Committee relative to the School Department budget and to raise, appropriate, 
transfer money from available funds, and change the purpose of the unexpended 
balances of prior appropriations, all to be used for the ensuing years operations: to 
act upon a request to authorize the school department to enter one or more contracts 
for the purchase of goods and/or services for a duration in excess of three years; to act 
upon a request to establish one or more new revolving funds, pursuant to state law: or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: School Committee) 

School Committee Chairman Jeffrev Loeb moved that the Town vote: 



12 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 

FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 * FY2002 

EXPENDED EXPENDED APPRO. FIN. COMM. 

RECOMMEND 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT: ADMINISTRATION & LEGAL 



003 SELECTMEN: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



005 



TOWN MANAGER: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Labor Consultants 

Capital Outlay 

Total 



307 LEGAL: 

Town Counsel-Litigation 
Town Counsel Expenses 
Total 

309 MODERATOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

)1 1 FINANCE COMMITTEE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 
ADMINISTRATION & LEGAL 



$4,000 


$5,600 


$5,680 


$5,760 


7,016 


7,280 


7,504 


7,704 














11,016 


12,880 


13,184 


13,464 


117,885 


122,954 


136,029 


132,429 


12,831 


12,982 


12,840 


12,723 


16,000 


18,000 


12,000 


20,000 














146,716 


153,936 


160,869 


165,152 











52,000 


56,500 


58,000 


35,000 





56,500 


58,000 


35,000 


52,000 


100 


100 


200 


200 














100 


100 


200 


200 


2,408 


2,800 


1,800 


2,750 


4,900 


4,900 


4,700 


5,550 


7,308 


7,700 


6,500 


8,300 



221,640 



232,616 



215,753 



239,116 



: INANCE DEPARTMENT 



)15 ELECTIONS & REGISTRATIONS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

>25 ACCOUNTANT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



19,262 


15,728 


17,597 


12,067 


8,733 


9,841 


12,745 


9,045 





1,000 





2,000 


27,995 


26,569 


30,342 


23,112 


118,424 


119,987 


125,653 


130,726 


10,741 


5,849 


6,251 


6,011 














129,165 


125,836 


131,904 


136,737 



13 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 





FY1999 


FY2000 


FY2001 * 


FY2002 




EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


APPRO. 


FIN. COMM. 
RECOMMEND 


026 MANAGEMENT INFO. SYSTEMS 










Salaries & Wages 


46,350 


41,320 


48,085 


48,000 


Expenses 


33,769 


33,923 


74,504 


95,024 


Capital Outlay 


13,000 


43,000 








Total 


93,119 


118,243 


122,589 


143,024 


029 ASSESSORS: 










Salaries & Wages 


125,613 


131,910 


136,295 


138,006 


Consultants 


3,500 








3,500 


Expenses 


10,385 


12,450 


9,920 


10,225 


Capital Outlay 








3,600 


32,200 


Total 


139,498 


144,360 


149,815 


183,931 


033 TREASURER/COLLECTOR: 










Salaries & Wages 


111,335 


115,655 


133,303 


139,033 


Expenses 


23,350 


26,605 


30,989 


30,912 


Capital Outlay 














Total 


134,685 


142,260 


164,292 


169,945 


035 PURCHASING & BUDGET 










Salaries & Wages 


31,437 


32,943 


32,613 


34,506 


Expenses 


7,635 


9,560 


7,260 


6,510 


Capital Outlay 


12,000 











Total 


51,072 


42,503 


39,873 


41,016 


039 TOWN CLERK: 










Salaries & Wages 


66,763 


70,377 


73,070 


76,574 


Expenses 


8,588 


8,140 


7,673 


8,374 


Capital Outlay 


2,000 











Total 


77,351 


78,517 


80,743 


84,948 



TOTAL FINANCE DEPARTMENT 
PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 



652,885 



678,288 



719,558 



782,713 



063 PLANNING BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


78,430 

33,852 



112,282 


84,100 

10,920 

25,000 

120,020 


88,958 

7,082 



96,040 


94,840 

7,920 

7,800 

110,560 


064 PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 









10,500 


10,500 




2,860 

35,000 

37,860 


500 

7,656 



8,156 



14 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



065 HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

066 CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT 

PUBLIC SAFETY DEPARTMENT 



FY1999 


FY2000 


FY2001 - 


FY2002 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


APPRO. 


FIN. COMM. 
RECOMMEND 


50 


50 


50 





2,865 


3,090 


3,690 


3,062 


2,700 











5,615 


3,140 


3,740 


3,062 


42,848 


46,407 


49,387 


53,498 


2,810 


2,485 


2,570 


2,765 














45,658 


48,892 


51,957 


56,263 



163.555 



182,552 



189,597 



178,041 



101 POLICE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Ambulance Contract 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

102 HARBORS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

103 FIRE: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

112 SHELLFISH: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



1,354,099 


1,413,595 


1,409,780 


1,653,384 


103,553 


109,828 


119,419 


122,529 


139,541 


143,722 


146,970 


147,756 


46,500 


80,700 


167,400 


101,700 


1,643,693 


1,747,845 


1,843,569 


2,025,369 


5,872 


8,424 


10,535 


10,535 


8,755 


10,088 


13,751 


13,144 














14,627 


18,512 


24,286 


23,679 


935,439 


960,118 


995,846 


1,077,638 


117,310 


119,331 


124,103 


106,349 


54,600 


28,900 


49,000 


9,700 


1,107,349 


1,108,349 


1,168,949 


1,193,687 


37,346 


39,100 


40,130 


39,556 


5,092 


4,071 


4,426 


6,175 














42,438 


43,171 


44,556 


45,731 



15 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



114 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

116 ANIMAL CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY DEPT. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



FY1999 


FY2000 


FY2001 * 


FY2002 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


APPRO. 


FIN. COMM. 
RECOMMEND 


3,400 


3,400 


3,503 


3,503 


1,851 


2,127 


2,385 


2,346 














5,251 


5,527 


5,888 


5,849 


32,732 


38,376 


37,781 


37.971 


8,966 


10,376 


9,433 


7,770 














41,698 


48,752 


47,214 


45,741 


2,855,056 


2,972,156 


3,134,462 


3,340,056 



301 ADMINISTRATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

302 GIS DEPARTMENT 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

303 HIGHWAY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Road Treatment 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

109 FORESTRY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



84,205 


87,969 


91,757 


91,580 


4,332 


5,424 


5,717 


6,063 














88,537 


93,393 


97,474 


97,643 


















































282,144 


292,285 


307,305 


288,710 


187,124 


189,196 


190,177 


169,756 


302,616 


316,260 


316,260 


334,373 


239,500 


91,111 


150,000 


141,287 


,011,384 


888,852 


963,742 


934,126 


74,325 


75,131 


81,352 


80,869 


17,968 


16,703 


17,312 


16,904 





90,000 





18,000 


92,293 


181,834 


98,664 


115,773 



305 SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 
Expenses 



131,370 



131,370 



132,529 



132,529 



16 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



309 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

403 SANITATION CONTRACT: 
Sanitation Composite Contract 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

405 SOLID WASTE TRANSFER STATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

407 TOWN HALL & ANNEX: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

408 NEW TOWN HALL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



410 CEMETERIES, PARKS & BUILDING MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Road Treatment 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS DEPT. 



FY1999 


FY2000 


FY2001 * 


FY2002 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


APPRO. 


FIN. COMM. 
RECOMMEND 


39,647 

53,291 

6,450 

99,388 


39,798 

52,286 

10,000 

102,084 


43,557 

50,959 

12,500 

107,016 


43,680 

52,936 

3,100 

99,716 


523,755 

3,500 



527,255 


544,706 

3,500 



548,206 


668,676 

7,100 



675,776 



679,005 


679,005 


34,525 

6,161 



40,686 


34,721 

9,247 



43,968 


37,954 

7,376 



45,330 


37,758 

11,351 



49,109 


30,088 

37,947 



68,035 


30,282 

37,072 

7,500 

74,854 


32,734 

52,977 



85,711 


35,392 

24,201 



59,593 




















91,254 

105,482 



196,736 


.NCE: 

257,283 

41,684 



65,150 

364,117 


261,206 

45,770 



21,000 

327,976 


275,796 

48,517 



12,500 

336,813 


269,088 

46,193 



8,000 

323,281 


2,423,065 


2,392,537 


2,543,055 


2,687,511 



17 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



FY1999 FY2000 
EXPENDED EXPENDED 



CODE ENFORCEMENT DEPARTMENT 

490 BUILDING INSPECTION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

061 APPEALS BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

501 HEALTH: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total *-- 

502 HEALTH CONTRACTS: 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Total 

TOTAL CODE ENFORCEMENT 

HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT 



360,247 



FY2001 * FY2002 

APPRO. FIN. COMM. 
RECOMMEND 



72,068 


76,659 


95,141 


99,113 


4,146 


9,370 


6,045 


6,211 














76,214 


86,029 


101,186 


105,324 


7,661 


16,342 


16,737 


16,498 


1,970 


2,770 


2,900 


3,370 














9,631 


19,112 


19,637 


19,868 


58,946 


53,707 


62,572 


65,516 


26,733 


30,747 


30,945 


33,092 














85,679 


84,454 


93,517 


98,608 


184,223 


202,669 


234,413 


235,159 


4,500 


4,500 


4,500 


4,000 


188,723 


207,169 


238,913 


239,159 



396,764 



453,253 



462,959 



520 


RECREATION AND YOUTH SERVICES: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Total 


96,962 

24,658 



121,620 


99,413 

27,222 



126,635 


99,542 

31,830 



131,372 


98,864 

27,909 



126,773 


531 


COUNCIL ON AGING: 
Salaries &JWages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


43,532 
22,997 
10,000 
76,529 


46,713 

24,008 



70,721 


51,577 

26,492 



78,069 


70,219 

13,177 



83,396 


551 


VETERANS' BENEFITS: 

Expenses 

Total 


18,000 
18,000 


80,000 
80,000 


57,000 
57,000 


50,000 
50,000 



TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES DEPT. 



216,149 



277,356 



266,441 



260,169 



13 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



FY1999 FY2000 

EXPENDED EXPENDED 



LIBRARY 

601 LIBRARY: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

TOTAL LIBRARY DEPT 

UNCLASSIFIED 



263,867 

126,776 

1,800 



282,550 

125,467 

2.200 



FY2001 * 
APPRO. 



306,010 

129,153 

14,600 



FY2002 

FIN. COMM. 

RECOMMEND 



318,006 

133,152 

4,600 



392,443 



410.217 



013 RESERVE FUND: (Transfers dispersed into appropriate budgets in prior years) 

25,550 58,800 



071 BENEFITS: 

Military Service Credits 
County Retirement System 
Health & Life 
Medicare 

Consolidated Benefits 
TOTAL BENEFITS 



449,763 



99,477 



081 INSURANCE: 

091 OFFICE SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT: 
Wages 
Expenses 

091 SALARY TRANSFER ACCOUNT: ** 

701 DEBT SERVICE: 
Payment of Principal 
Payment of Interest 

Interest on Antic. Notes; Debt Issuance Fees 
Total 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED: 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET:*** 



823,109 
823,109 

140,325 




139,375 

24,546 



150,138 

95,000 

7,920 

253,058 



831,145 
831,145 

154,332 




104,775 

54,759 



118,380 

239,000 

12,045 

369,425 



804,434 
804,434 

148,122 



6,750 
142,575 

23.759 



186,467 

319,000 

8,438 

513.905 



1,405,963 1,573,236 1,739,022 



455,758 



66,767 



1,016,476 
1,016,476 

157,537 



6,750 
90,165 

98,399 



250,654 

315,000 

31,050 

596,704 



2,032,798 



$8,691,003 $9,115,722 $9,710,904 $10,439,122 



* Note: FY2001 reflects Reserve Fund transfers through November 30,2000. 
** Represents allowance for salary/wage increases; appropriations approved in 

prior years have been dispersed into individual department budgets. 
***FY98 through FY00 budget totals adjusted by deleting Sewer Division. 



19 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

IPSWICH PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

RECOMMENDED OPERATING BUDGET FOR FY2002 



INTRODUCTION: Action by the Annual Town Meeting, Monday, April 2, 2002 will establish the 
amount of money to be set aside for schools. Once this budget total is established, the School 
Committee, by statute, has fiscal autonomy and may use the funds in the best interest of the 
schools. The Town of Ipswich School Budget, which follows, represents the School Committee's 
best estimate of the way funds voted at Town meeting will be deployed. 

SELECTED BUDGET ITEMS 



DOYON SCHOOL 

216LinebrookRd. 
Personnel 

Teachers 

Support 
Instructional Expenses 

Regular Program 

SPED 

Art/Music 

Phys. Ed 
Non-Instructional 
Capital 

SUBTOTAL 



FYOO Actual | FY01 Budgeted I 



Building 50,500 sf; 34 Teacher Stations; 500 Students 



FY02 Proposed 



1,417,954 


1,419,331 


1.410,663 


778,311 


816,695 


809,139 


153,679 


172,972 


189,836 


55,231 


38,118 


63,061 


6,262 


6,626 


7,625 


1,263 


1,800 


2,267 


74,043 


74,772 


100,071 





560 





$2,486,743 


$2,530,874 


$2,582,662 



WINTHROP SCHOOL 

65 Central St. 
Personnel 

Teachers 

Support 
Instructional Expenses 

Regular Program 

SPED 

Art/Music 

Phys. Ed 
Non-Instructional 
Capital 

SUBTOTAL 



Building 38,750 sf; 32 Teacher Stations: 500 Students 



1,362,185 


1,418,279 


1.490.764 


746,016 


804,026 


716.867 


97,255 


119,163 


229,737 


96.260 


79,166 


61,635 


7,017 


8,153 


9.117 


1,200 


1,402 


1,400 


80,321 


83,030 


111,455 











$2,390,254 


$2,513,219 


52,620,975 



MIDDLE SCHOOL 

130 High Street 
Personnel 

Teachers 

Support 
Instructional Expenses 

Regular Program 

SPED 

Art/Music 

Phys. Ed 

Technical Ed 
Non-Instructional 
Capital 

SUBTOTAL 



MS/HS Building 201,526 sf 

37 Teacher Stations + 7 shared w/HS: 502 Students 



1,521.901 


1,615,090 


1,679,414 


584,124 


647,921 


691,015 


102,542 


151.197 


174,358 


232,220 


256,048 


191,477 


13.477 


13,920 


23,853 


1.890 


2,089 


2,229 


5.105 


3,386 


4.110 


116.620 


190,001 


223.254 











$2,577,879 


$2,879,652 


$2,989,710 



20 



FYOO 

Actual 



FY01 
B udg ete d 



FY02 
Proposed 



HIGH SCHOOL 

134 High St. 
Personnel 

Teachers 

Support 
Instructional Expenses 

Regular Program 

SPED 

Art/Music 

Phys. Ed 

Technical Ed 
Non-Instructional 
Capital 

SUBTOTAL 



CENTRAL OFFICE - Building = 2,576 SF 
One Lord Square 
Support Staff 

SUBTOTAL 
Curriculum(Stipends) 

Music 

Math 

Science 

Social Studies 

Communications 
Instructional Expenses 
Non-Instructional Expenses 
Capital 

SUBTOTAL 

ALL DISTRICT ITEMS 

Transportation 

SPED 

Regular 

Employee Benefits 
Buildings & Grounds Maint 
SUBTOTAL 

TOTALS 



MS/HS Building 201,526 sf: 

34 Teacher Stations + 7 shared w/MS: 512 students 



1,702,317 
929,133 

224,059 

302,238 

10,390 

4,600 

4,390 

121,632 





$716,854 



1,724,445 
1,002,785 

274,498 

337,131 

15,537 

4,583 

4,390 

191,002 





$473,441 



1.926,536 
1,034.277 

354.128 

366.322 

31,024 

4,883 

4,355 

215,170 





$3,298,759 


$3,554,371 


$3,936,695 


$635,251 


$716,984 


$661,960 


3.500 


3.500 


6,600 


6,600 


6,600 


6,600 


6,600 


6,600 


6,600 


6,600 


6.600 


6.600 


6.600 


6,600 


6.600 


76,000 


25,670 


33,741 


610,954 


417,871 


333,345 












$400,086 



134,101 

184,900 

871,272 

44,773 


199,900 

363,195 

1,005,391 

34,189 


204,689 

363.195 

1,297,205 

55.000 


$1,235,046 
$13,340,786 


$1,602,675 
$14,271,216 


$1,920,089 
$15,112,177 



21 



(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $15,1 12,077 for the School Department budget 
forFY02 and 

for the FY02 School Department Budget of $15, 1 12,077 

(2) to transfer from available funds: 

Free Cash 381,951 

Plum Island National Wildlife Refuge In Lieu of Taxes 22, 195 

Lottery Fund Additional Distribution 52,470 

Overlay Surplus 6 7,500 

524,116 

Leaving a subtotal (for the school operating budget) 

net to be raised and assessed of: $14,587,961 

Seconded. 

School Committee and Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. The Finance 
Committee voted 7 to 1 in favor. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 1 1 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to cover the 
Town's share of the ensuing year's annual operating and debt service expenses of the 
Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: Whittier RVTHS Representative Raymond 
Morley) 

Finance Committee Member/Whittier RVTHS Representative Raymond Morley moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $21 1,456 for the Town's share 
of the FY02 annual operating, capital, and debt service expenses of the Whittier 
Regional Vocational Technical High School District. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. The School 
Committee voted 6 to 1 in favor. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 



ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
ensuing year's expenses of the Water Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be 
offset by revenues of the Water Division during FY02; and (2) to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the ensuing year's expenses of the Sewer Division, Department of 
Utilities, said sum to be offset by revenues of the Sewer Division during FY2001; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Water/Sewer 
Commissioners) 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen James Engel moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,839,248 for the FY02 operating, debt 
service, and capital expenses of the Water Division, Department of Utilities, said sum 



22 



to be offset by revenues from the water division during FY02 as follows: 

for the FY02 Water Budget of $1,836,898 

(which net sum shall be offset by revenues of 
the water division during FY02); 

and 

(2) to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,122,099 for the FY02 operating, debt 
service, and capital expenses of the Wastewater Division, Department of Utilities, said 
sum to be offset by revenues from the sewer division during FY02. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to survey, design, and 
undertake repairs to roads and bridges under the provisions of Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws, and to obtain any materiel and/or services incidental thereto; (2) to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire easements in conjunction therewith by 
purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; (3) in furtherance of the project(s), 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any federal, state 
and /or private grants without further appropriation thereof; (4) to determine whether 
said appropriation shall be raised by taxes, by transfer from available funds, or by 
borrowing; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of 
Selectmen) 

Selectman Eugene Hailson moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $214,756 to engage engineering services and to 
acquire any related materiel and /or services for the construction and maintenance of 
roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the General Laws, as amended; and 

(2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend without 
further appropriation any federal and/or state grants which may be available for the 
aforementioned purposes. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14 

To hear and act on the reports of the Committees and to continue such Committees as 
the Town may vote to continue; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested 
by: Board of Selectmen) 

Terri Stephens read the report for the Hall-Haskell-House Committee and moved to 
accept the report and continue the committee. Seconded. Motion carried 
unanimously. 



23 



It was moved and seconded to continue the Historic District Study Committee. 
Motion carried unanimously. 

Dorcas Rice read the report for the Commuter Rail Committee and moved to accept 
the report and continue the committee. Seconded. Motion carried unanimously. 

Glenn Hazelton read the report for the Open Space Committee and moved to accept 
the report and continue the committee. Seconded. Motion carried unanimously. 

Blaine Hebbel read the report for the School Building Needs Committee and moved to 
accept the report and continue the committee. Seconded. Motion carried 
unanimously. 

Larry Seidler read the report for the School Building Committee and moved to accept 
the report and continue the committee. Seconded. Motion carried unanimously. 

Town Manager George Howe read the report for the Ipswich Coalition on Youth and 
moved to accept the report and continue the committee. Seconded. Motion carried 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote: 

to appropriate a sum of money (a) for the development, design, purchase and 
installation of computer hardware, other data processing equipment and computer 
assisted integrated financial management and accounting systems; (b) for the 
development, design, and purchase of computer software incident to the purchase, 
installation and operation of computer hardware and other data processing equipment 
and computer assisted integrated financial management and accounting systems; and 
(c) to obtain any materiel and/or services incidental thereto; 

to authorize the Town to enter one or more contracts for the lease of computer 
hardware, other data processing equipment and computer assisted integrated 
financial management and accounting systems for the development, design, and the 
purchase of computer software incident to the purchase, installation and operation of 
computer hardware and other data processing equipment and computer assisted 
integrated financial management and accounting systems and any materiel and /or 
services incidental thereto; 

to determine if said appropriation shall be raised by taxes, by transfer from available 
funds, or by borrowing; and 

to raise and appropriate an additional sum of money to pay the Town's share of any 
FY02 debt service and /or lease payments, license and support services expenses 
incurred hereunder; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote: 



24 



1) to appropriate $250,000 (a) for the development, design, purchase and installation 
of computer hardware, other data processing equipment and computer assisted 
integrated financial management and accounting systems; (b) for the development, 
design, and purchase of computer software incident to the purchase, installation and 
operation of computer hardware and other data processing equipment and computer 
assisted integrated financial management and accounting systems; and (c) to obtain 
any materiel and/or services incidental thereto; 

2) to authorize the Town to enter one or more contracts for the lease of computer 
hardware, other data processing equipment and computer assisted integrated 
financial management and accounting systems for the development, design, and the 
purchase of computer software incident to the purchase, installation and operation of 
computer hardware and other data processing equipment and computer assisted 
integrated financial management and accounting systems and to obtain any materiel 
and/or services incidental thereto; and 

3) to raise the $250,000 appropriation by authorizing the treasurer, with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to hire professional 
consultants to prepare an environmental impact report, per Massachusetts Executive 
Office of Environmental Affairs guidelines, the scope of which, in addition to fulfilling 
all other relevant EOEA guidelines for an Environmental Impact Report ("EIR"), shall 
compare the direct and indirect costs, benefits and impacts and likely outcomes of 
each of the two strategies: a) septic system management program, and b) conventional 
collector sewer system and treatment at the Fowlers Lane treatment plant with 
discharge through the plant outfall and /or to an alternative outfall, and to obtain any 
materiel and /or services incidental thereto; and to determine if said appropriation 
shall be raised by taxes, transfer from available funds, or by borrowing; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Sewer Commissioners) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote: 

1) to appropriate the sum of $300,000 to hire professional consultants to prepare an 
environmental impact report, per Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental 
Affairs guidelines, the scope of which, in addition to fulfilling all other relevant EOEA 
guidelines for an Environmental Impact Report ("EIR"), shall compare the direct and 
indirect costs, benefits and impacts and likely outcomes of each of the two strategies: 
a) septic system management program, and b) conventional collector sewer system 
and treatment at the Fowlers Lane treatment plant with discharge through the plant 
outfall and /or to an alternative outfall; and to obtain any materiel and/or services 
incidental thereto; and 



25 



2) to raise this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7 (22). Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Several 
voters spoke for and against the motion. The question was moved, seconded and so 
voted. On a hand count with 128 in favor and 24 against, the motion carried by 2/3 
majority vote. 



Outgoing Selectman Edward Rauscher received a standing ovation from the voters at 
the meeting and praise from Chairman James Engel. 



ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to and to survey, design, 
construct and/or reconstruct sidewalks; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase, or eminent domain; and (3) to 
determine if this appropriation shall be raised by taxes, transfer from available funds, 
or by borrowing; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Armand 
Michaud, DPW Director) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate $255,000 to 
survey, design, construct and/or reconstruct sidewalks; (2) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire necessary easements by gift, purchase, or eminent domain; and 
(3) to raise this appropriation by authorizing the treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7 (6). Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to and to survey, 
design, construct and/or reconstruct Hammatt Street, including but not limited to 
pavement, sidewalks, storm drainage, street trees, and other appurtenances, and to 
obtain any materiel and/or service incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire necessary easements by gift, purchase, or eminent domain; (3) to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for and to expend without further 
appropriation any grants in conjunction therewith; and (4) to determine if this 
appropriation shall be raised by taxes, transfer from available funds, or by borrowing; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Armand Michaud, DPW 
Director) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote: (1) to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $150,000 to survey, design, construct and/or reconstruct Hammatt Street, 
including but not limited to pavement, sidewalks, storm drainage, street trees, and 
other appurtenances, and to obtain any materiel and/or service incidental thereto: (2) 



26 



to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire necessary easements by gift, purchase, 
or eminent domain; (3) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for and to expend 
without further appropriation any grants in conjunction therewith; (4) said 
appropriation to be offset by $150,000 in estimated receipts as reimbursable grant 
proceeds from the Massachusetts Highway Department. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to and to survey and 
design improvements to North Main Street and the North Meetinghouse Green, 
including but not limited to pavement, sidewalks, storm drainage, street trees, and 
other appurtenances, and to obtain any materiel and/or service incidental thereto; (2) 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire necessary easements by gift, purchase, 
or eminent domain; (3) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for and to expend 
without further appropriation any grants in conjunction therewith; and (4) to 
determine if this appropriation shall be raised by taxes, transfer from available funds, 
or by borrowing; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Armand 
Michaud, DPW Director) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of 
$88,500 to survey and design streetscape and drainage improvements in the area of 
North Main Street; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire necessary 
easements by gift, purchase, or eminent domain; (3) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any federal, state and/or private grants in 
connection with said projects without further appropriation thereof; and (4) to meet 
this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of MGL Chapter 44, 
Section 7. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to engage engineers 
and /or architects to prepare plans and specifications for remodeling, reconstructing, 
and /or making extraordinary repairs to the Paul F. Doyon Elementary School and the 
Winthrop Elementary School, including original equipment and landscaping, paving 
and other site improvements incidental or directly related to such remodeling, 
reconstruction or repair, and to obtain any materiel and services incidental thereto; (2) 
to raise this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds; and (3) to authorize the School Committee to 
apply for, accept, and expend any federal, state, and/or private grants in conjunction 
with said project;; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: School 
Committee) 

School Committee member Joan Arsenault moved that the Town will vote (1) to 



27 



appropriate the sum of $250,000 to engage engineers and/or architects to prepare 
plans and specifications for remodeling, reconstructing, and/or making extraordinary 
repairs to the Paul F. Doyon Elementary School and the Winthrop Elementary School, 
including original equipment and landscaping, paving and other site improvements 
incidental or directly related to such remodeling, reconstruction or repair, and to 
obtain any materiel and services incidental thereto; (2) to raise this appropriation by 
authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds 
under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7 (21) 
and/or Chapter 70B; and (3) to authorize the School Committee to apply for, accept, 
and expend any federal, state, and/or private grants in conjunction with said project. 
Seconded. 

School Committee and Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. The Finance 
Committee voted 8 to 1 in favor of the motion. Motion carried by unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to engage architects, 
engineers, and/or other consultants to prepare a public safety feasibility study, and to 
obtain any materiel and/or services incidental thereto; the scope of this study shall 
include, but not necessarily be limited to: rehabilitation of and/or additions to the 
Central Fire Station and/or Police Headquarters; construction of a new fire station in 
the downtown; rehabilitation of the Linebrook Station; establishing any new 
substations elsewhere in Ipswich or its environs; public safety staffing and deployment 
issues; amending and updating the capital equipment acquisition and replacement 
plan; and evaluating the nature of public safety responses from the Central Fire 
Station, Linebrook Station, and/or any other Fire substation as well as the nature of 
our emergency medical response system; (2) to determine that said funds shall be 
raised by borrowing; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board 
of Selectmen; Fire Station Study Committee) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote: (1) to appropriate the sum of 
$100,000 to engage architects, engineers, and/or other consultants to prepare a 
public safety feasibility study, and to obtain any materiel and/or services incidental 
thereto; the scope of this study shall include, but not necessarily be limited to 
evaluating: a) public safety staffing and deployment issues and the nature of public 
safety responses from both the Central Fire Station, Linebrook Station, and /or any 
other substation(s) and the nature generally of our emergency medical response 
system; b) the community's needs for public safety apparatus and equipment; c) 
rehabilitation of and/or additions to the Central Fire Station and/or the Police 
Headquarters; d) construction of a new fire station in the downtown; e) rehabilitation 
of the Linebrook Station; f) development of any new substation(s) elsewhere in Ipswich 
or its environs; (2) to raise this appropriation by authorizing the treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes pursuant to the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7 (22). Seconded. 

Selectman Foley informed the voters about a little of the history of the Fire 
Department in Ipswich and fully explained why the information from this public safety 
study was needed in order to make changes in the general public safety needs of the 

28 



town. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 22 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to ratify and confirm the proposed acquisition of 
interests in one or more parcels of land, each at an intended purchase price in excess 
of $1,500,000, in accordance with the conditions of the bonds authorized to be issued 
under Article 18 of the Warrant for the April 03, 2000 Annual Town Meeting; to amend 
its action taken under Article 10 of the Warrant for the October 16, 2000, Special 
Town Meeting by inserting after the words "acquisition for general municipal purposes 
of the fee interest" the words "or for conservation purposes of a lesser interest", and 
after the words "acquisition of this property" the words "or lesser interest therein"; and 
(3) to add parcels to, or delete parcels from, the list (as referenced in said Article 18) on 
file in the office of the Planning Board and in the Office of the Town Clerk, said 
changes to be placed on file in the office of the Planning Board and in the Office of the 
Town Clerk by March 09, 2001; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested 
by: Open Space Committee) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that Town vote: 

(1) to amend its action taken under Article 10 of the October 16, 2000, Special Town 
Meeting by inserting after the words "acquisition for general municipal purposes of the 
fee interest" the words "or a less than fee interest", and replacing the words "three 
million five hundred thousand" with the words "two million", and after the words 
"acquisition of this property" the words "or lesser interest therein"; and 

(2) to add the following parcels to the list (as referenced in Article 18 of the Warrant for 
the April 3, 2000 Annual Town Meeting) on file in the office of the Planning Board and 
in the Office of the Town Clerk, said changes having been placed on file in the office of 
the Planning Board and in the Office of the Town Clerk by March 9, 2001: 

Land now/formerly of Roy Smolensk!, Assessor's map 19B, parcel 4, consisting of 
approximately 16.9 acres southwesterly of Dow Reservoir; and 

Land now/ formerly of John W. Ross, Trustee, Assessors Map 20B, Lot 38, land east of 

High Street along the Egypt River 

Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. The Finance Committee voted 7 to 1 
in favor of the motion. The Conservation Commission and the Open Space Committee 
unanimously recommended. Several voters spoke for and against the motion. The 
motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 23 

To see if the Town will vote, under the provisions of Chapter 43B of the General Laws 
of Massachusetts, to adopt an order under Section 10(a) thereof proposing the 



29 



following amendment to the Town Charter, subject to the approval of the Attorney 
General pursuant to Section 10(c) thereof, to be submitted to the voters in accordance 
with Section 1 1 thereof at that part of the next Annual Town Meeting devoted to 
balloting in 2002: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Charter (Chapter 620 of the Acts of 
1966), SECTION 5. " Other Elective Boards and Offices .", after the words "...prior to the 
acceptance of this act. . ." by inserting the following clause: 

" , provided, however, the term of office of constable shall be three years."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote, under the provisions of Chapter 
43B of the General Laws of Massachusetts, to adopt an order under Section 10(a) 
thereof proposing the following amendment to the Town Charter, subject to the 
approval of the Attorney General pursuant to Section 10(c) thereof, to be submitted to 
the voters in accordance with Section 1 1 thereof at that part of the next Annual Town 
Meeting devoted to balloting in 2002: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Charter (Chapter 620 of the Acts of 
1966), SECTION 5. " Other Elective Boards and Offices .", after the words "...prior to the 
acceptance of this act. . ." by inserting the following clause: " , provided, however, the 
term of office of constable shall be three years." 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 24 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to acquire interests in 
certain parcels for watershed protection, in the areas of: (a) High Street and Mitchell 
Rd (land now or formerly of Robert Statho - Assessors Map 30A, Lot 25); and (b) Dow 
Brook (land now or formerly of Hubert A. Gaspar, Jr. and Dennis Gaspar - Assessors 
Map 20C, Lot 3); 

(2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire said interests by purchase, gift, 
lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; (3) to determine if said appropriate said bt . 
by taxes, by transfer from available funds, or by borrowing; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Water Commissioners) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to appropriate the sum of $50,000 to acquire interests in a certain parcel for 
watershed protection, in the area of: High Street and Mitchell Rd (land now or formerly 
of Robert Statho - Assessors Map 30A, Lot 25; 

(2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire said interests by purchase, gift, 
lease, or otherwise; and 

30 



(3) to raise said appropriation by transferring the sum of $50,000 from water surplus. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. The Finance Committee voted 5 to 2 
in favor with one abstention. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 25 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich, 
"CHAPTER IV, Section 3. Annual Town Report ", by deleting from the first sentence 
thereof the words ". . .at least one week prior to the date of the Annual Town 
Meeting."; and by substituting in lieu thereof the words: ". . .no later than one 
hundred twenty days following the close of the fiscal year."; so that said first sentence, 
as amended, shall read; 

'The Annual Town Report, as prepared and published by the Town Manager, shall be 
issued no later than one hundred twenty days following the close of the fiscal year."; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Town Manager) 

Selectman Eugene Hailson moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 26 

To see if the town will vote: (1) To establish an Education Savings Plan under which all 
parents of school-age children residing in Ipswich may join. (2) Parents choosing to 
participate will receive a Parents Choice Certificate of $2,500 or less to assist financing 
their child in a non-public school. (3) The Plan will phase in over five years. Three 
hundred Certificates of $500 each will be available the first year. (4) In the second 
year, 350 at $ 1,000; third year, 400 Certificates at $1,500; fourth year, 450 at 
$2,000; and in the fifth year and beyond, 500 Certificates at $2,500 each. After that, 
Certificates will increase at same rate as public schools' per-student cost. If parent 
applications exceed the above totals, allocations of Certificates will be made by lottery. 
(5) The Plan will be administered by the School Department and funded from its 
budget. (6) The present annual per-student cost to educate students in the Ipswich 
public schools is $5,200. The School Department will save $2,700 or more, depending 
on the year, by reducing its enrollment by one student under the Plan. (7) A Parents 
Choice Certificate will be issued only to the parents of a school-age child in Ipswich, 
not to a non-public school directly. The initial certificates will be available for the 
2001-2002 school year. Deadline for applications will be July 15, 2001 and parents 
notified by August 1, 2001. (By Petition of Ian F. Forman and others) 

Ian Forman moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 27 

To see if the Town will vote to establish a committee to inquire into the operations and 
financial records of the Feoffees of the Grammar School and report its findings to the 

31 



Annual Town Meeting in April Of 2002, and to instruct the Moderator to appoint one 
member each of the Board of Selectmen, the School Committee, and the Finance 
Committee, and four otherwise unaffiliated registered voters of the Town; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. (By Petition: Robert K. Weatherall and others) 

Robert K. Weatherall moved that the Town vote to establish a committee to inquire 
into the operations and financial records of the Feoffees of the Grammar School and 
report its findings to the Annual Town Meeting in April of 2002, and to instruct the 
Moderator to appoint one member each of the Board of Selectmen, the School 
Committee, and the Finance Committee, and four otherwise unaffiliated registered 
voters of the Town. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen voted three in favor with two abstentions. The Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. The School Committee voted 4 to 2 against with one 
abstention. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 28 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all previous articles raising and/or 
appropriating money which have a direct impact on the levy for the next ensuing fiscal 
year, as contained in this warrant, for the purpose of completing a budget which is 
balanced and in compliance with the levy limit provisions of Proposition 2 1 /2, so called; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

Motion to adjourn was moved, seconded and so voted. The 368 th Annual Town 
Meeting was adjourned at 1 1:55 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the 
Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, by publication at least 
seven days prior to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper published in, or 
having a general circulation in, the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this 5 th day of March in the year of our Lord, Two Thousand and 
One. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James R. Engel 
Patrick J. McNally 
Edward B. Rauscher 
Eugene A. Hailson 
James W. Foley 



32 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
October 15, 2001 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 
notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to 
meet at the auditorium of the Ipswich High School, 134 High Street, in said Ipswich, 
on MONDAY, THE FIFTEENTH OF OCTOBER, 2001, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, 
then and there to act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called the meeting to order at 7:43 p.m. with 290 voters 
present. The final count was 363 at 9 p.m. Following the Pledge of Allegiance to the 
Flag led by Firefighter Lee Prentiss, accompanied by his dog, a moment of silence 
was observed in memory of the September 11 th attack on the World Trade Center in 
New York. (Lee Prentiss was a member of the rescue team that was called to search 
for survivors after the September 1 1 th attack in New York.) It was moved, seconded 
and so voted to admit non-voters. Mr. Grimes informed voters about town meeting 
procedures and appointed the following tellers: Bill Nelson, Nat Pulsifer, Ed 
Sullivan and Betty Dorman. Three students from Ken Spellman's class served as 
timekeepers. Deborah Eliason from Kopelman and Paige was Town Counsel. 

October 16 th - Second night of the Special Town Meeting 

The Moderator announced that there was no quorum and the meeting was 

adjourned to Tuesday, October 23 rd at the New Town Hall on 25 Green Street. 

October 23 rd - Third night of the Special Town Meeting 

The following town officials convened at the Town Hall, 25 Green Street: Town 
Manager, George Howe, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen James Engel, 
Moderator James Grimes and Town Clerk Frances Richards. At 7:30 p.m., Town 
Manager George Howe moved that the Special Town Meeting be adjourned and 
reconvened at the Performing Arts Center at 7:45 p.m. It was seconded and so 
voted. Moderator Grimes opened the meeting at 7:48 p.m. at the Performing Arts 
Center with 252 voters present. The tellers were: David Standley, Joe Rogers and 
Don Francis. Deborah Eliason from Kopelman and Paige was Town Counsel. 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action previously taken under Article 8 of 
the April 02, 2001, Annual Town Meeting (the FY02 Municipal Operating Budget), 
by raising and appropriating an additional sum of money, and/or by transferring 
sums of money between departmental accounts, and/or by transferring sums of 
money from available funds, and/or by determining if a portion of said additional 
appropriations shall be offset by estimated receipts of user fees, in accordance with 

33 



the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53E; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Eugene Hailson moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken 
under Article 8 of the April 2, 2001, Annual Town Meeting (FY02 town operating 
budget) by: 

Transferring from: Council on Aging Salaries $9,682 

Transferring to: Recreation Salaries $9,682 

Transferring from: New Town Hall Salaries $3,080 

Transferring to: New Town Hall Expenses $3,080 

so that the appropriation originally authorized under this article ($10, 127,249) 
remains unchanged. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action previously taken under Article 12 of 
the April 02, 2001, Annual Town Meeting (the FY02 Water and Sewer Operating 
Budgets), by appropriating sums of money, in addition to that appropriated under 
said Article 12, said appropriations to be raised, respectively, either by taxes and/or 
by the transfer of equal sums of money from water surplus and from sewer surplus, 
respectively; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Water & 
Sewer Commissioners) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote: (1) to amend its action taken 
under Article 12 of the April 02, 2001, Annual Town Meeting (the FY02 Water 
Budget) by increasing the appropriation to be raised and assessed from $1,839,248 
to $1,896,189 said additional $56,941 to be offset by revenues from the water 
division during FY02; the balance of previous action under said Article 12 to remain 
unchanged; and (2) to amend its action taken under Article 12 of the April 02, 2001, 
Annual Town Meeting (the FY02 Wastewater Budget) by transferring an additional 
$23,769 from sewer surplus to offset the previously-approved appropriation. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 10 of the 
Warrant for the April 02, 2001, Annual Town Meeting (the FY02 School Department 
Operating Budget), to increase the appropriation authorized thereunder; to 

34 



determine whether said increase shall be met by raising taxes, by transfer from 
available funds, or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: 
School Committee) 

School Committee Chairman Joan Arsenault moved that the Town vote to amend its 
action taken under Article 10 of the April 02, 2001, Annual Town Meeting (the FY02 
School Operating Budget), by increasing the sum to be raised an appropriated from 
$15,1 12,077 to $15,265,659; said sum to be raised by transfer of an equal sum 
from available funds (FY01 Medicaid reimbursements), so that the total 
appropriation under this article shall be:$ 15,265,659; the total transferred from 
available funds shall be $677,698; and the net to be raised and assessed shall 
remain unchanged at $14,587,961. Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and /or transfer from available 
funds a sum of money to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining 
unpaid; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Eugene Hailson moved that the Town vote (a) to appropriate the sum of 
$36,028.68 to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 

Fire Dept. Expenses Northeast Hospital Corp. (Linehan) $ 1,820.00 

Joseph Upton, MD (Linehan) 125.00 

Legal Expenses Kopelman and Paige 12,326.32 

Misc. Fin. Benefits MIIA, Inc. - Health Insurance 21,367.87 

Building Insp. - Exp. Aspen Publishing 94.39 

School Department Zodiac Paint & Paper 201.35 

Water Department Community Newspaper Company 93.75 

$ 36,028.68; 

and (b) to meet this appropriation by raising $35,934.93 in taxes and by 
transferring $93.75 from water surplus. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. The voice 
vote on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count with 2 against and more 
than 25 in favor, the Moderator declared the motion carried by the required 9/10's 
majority vote. 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote: to amend its action taken under Article 13 of the 
Warrant for the April 02, 2001, Annual Town Meeting (Chapter 90), and /or under 

35 



Article 14 of the Warrant for the April 3, 2000, Annual Town Meeting, by either 
increasing or decreasing the appropriations authorized thereunder, and/or by 
adjusting the amount transferred from available funds (attributable to FY02 and /or 
to any prior fiscal year) for said purposes; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that the Town vote: (1) to amend its action 
taken under Article 14 of the April 3, 2000, Annual Town Meeting by increasing the 
appropriation from $214,756 to $219,366, and by transferring from available funds 
(FY01 Chapter 90) the sum of $4,610; and (2) to amend its action taken under 
Article 13 of the April 2, 2001, Annual Town Meeting by decreasing the 
appropriation from $214,756 to $109,470, and by reducing the FY02 Chapter 90 
available funds offset to $109,470. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money, in addition to that 
appropriated under Article 1 1 of the October 21, 1996, Special Town Meeting to 
survey, design and construct a new middle school, a new high school, a new 
auditorium, athletic fields and facilities and other appurtenant facilities (all to be 
located on the site of the existing high school), and additional athletic fields and 
appurtenant facilities to be located at the Mile Lane site (Assessors' Map 29A, Lot 5), 
and to obtain any materiel and services incidental thereto; and (2) to determine 
whether said additional appropriation shall be raised by taxes, transferred from 
available funds, or by borrowing under the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7, as amended, or under the provisions of Chapter 645 of 
the Acts of 1948, as amended; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: 
School Committee) 

School Committee member Jeffrey Loeb moved that the Town vote: (1) to 
appropriate the sum of $150,000, in addition to that appropriated under Article 11 
of the October 21, 1996, Special Town Meeting to survey, design and construct a 
new middle school, a new high school, a new auditorium, athletic fields and 
facilities and other appurtenant facilities (all to be located on the site of the existing 
high school), and additional athletic fields and appurtenant facilities to be located at 
the Mile Lane site (Assessors' Map 29A, Lot 5), and to obtain any materiel and 
services incidental thereto; and (2) to raise said appropriation by authorizing the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds under the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7, as amended, or 
under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 70B, as amended. 
Seconded. 

The School Committee voted 6 to 1 in favor of appropriation and 5 to 1 in favor of 

36 



bonding. Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended and the Finance 
Committee voted 8 to 1 in favor. 

The voice vote on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count with 60 voting 
against and 193 voting in favor, the motion carried by more than the required 2/3's 
majority vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to repair or 
reconstruct the sewage pumping station in the area of High Street (commonly 
known at the Lappin Station), and to obtain any materiel and /or services incidental 
thereto; and (2) to determine if said appropriation shall be raised by taxes, 
transferred from available funds, or by borrowing; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the town vote: (1) to appropriate $150,000 to 
repair or reconstruct the so-called Lappin (wastewater) Pumping Station located 
adjacent to the shopping center, 146 High Street, and to obtain any materiel and or 
service incidental thereto; and (2) to raise this appropriation by authorizing the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial 
notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7 
(1). Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. The Finance Committee voted 7 in 
favor, 1 against and 1 abstention. 

The voice vote on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count with 31 voting 
against and 216 voting in favor, the motion passed by the required 2/3's majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to adopt the provisions of Chapter 32B, Sections (7A) 
and (9E) of the Massachusetts General Laws, which sections provide that the Town, 
in addition to the payment of fifty percent of a premium for contributory group life 
and health insurance for employees in the service of the Town and their dependents, 
and employees retired from the service of the Town, pay subsidiary or additional 
rate. (By petition of Peter G. Nikas, Edward W. Walsh, and others) 

John Chmura moved that the Town vote to adopt the provisions of Chapter 32B, 
Sections (7A) and (9E) of the Massachusetts General Laws, which sections provide 
that the town, in addition to the payment of fifty percent of a premium for 
contributory group life and health insurance for employees in the service of the 
Town and their dependents, and employees retired from the service of the town, 
shall pay a subsidiary or additional rate. Seconded. 

37 



Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. The Finance Committee voted 8 
against the motion with 1 abstention. 

George Markos spoke against the motion. James Foley, Betty Dorman, Peter Nikas, 
Gavin Keenan. John Chmura and Bill Wasserman spoke in favor of the motion. 

The question was moved, seconded and so voted. 

On a hand count with 295 voting in favor and 13 voting against, the motion carried 
by more than a simple majority vote. 



Growth Management Steering Committee Chairman and Planning Board member 
Robert Weatherall. Jr. gave a brief overview of the next six articles and asked voters 
to support articles 9 through 14. 



ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by revising SECTION IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS. A. Open Space 

Preservation (Cluster] Zoning (OSPZ) as follows: 

1) Amend 2. Applicability , first sentence, by deleting the words "minimum of five (5) 
acres" and substituting in lieu thereof the words "minimurn of four (4) acres": and 

2) Amend 4. Density Standards , by deleting the third sentence of "c. Maximum 
Density " in its entirety and by deleting the words "under (1) above" from the first 
sentence of said paragraph and substituting in lieu thereof the words "under a. 
above"; and 

3) Amend "5. Development Requirements , c. Open Space Restriction ", as follows: 

In first sentence, delete the words "minimurn of thirty percent (30%)" and substitute 
in lieu thereof the words "minimum of fifty percent (50%)"; and 

Add subparagraph "(6)". to read as follows: 'The open space, in its entirety or a 
percentage thereof, may be held in non-common ownership, if approved by the 
Planning Board.": and 

Delete, in its entirety, the third sentence of the paragraph begiiining with the phrase 
"In designating the open space," and substitute in lieu thereof the following 
sentence: "No more than fifty- percent (50%) of the designated open space may be 
comprised of wetlands, or land having an average grade greater than twenty-five 
percent (25%)."; and 

38 



4) Amend "5. Development Requirements d. Dimensional Regulations " as follows: 

Revise first sentence by deleting the word "iriinimuirr; and 

Modify paragraph "(2)" by deleting, in both sentences, the words "thirty (30%) 
percent" and substituting in lieu thereof the words "twenty-five (25%) percent"; and 

Amend paragraph "(3)" by deleting the paragraph in its entirety and substituting in 
lieu thereof the following: "(3) For each lot located within any minimum tract, the 
minimum lot width shall be 75 feet, the minimum lot frontage shall be 50 feet, the 
minimum front, side and rear setbacks shall be 20 feet, 10 feet (per side) and 25 
feet, respectively, and the maximum building coverage shall be 30%."; and 

Delete paragraphs "(4)" in its entirety, and renumber paragraph "(5)" to "(4)"; and 

Renumber paragraph "(6)" to "(5)", delete the language in its entirety, and substitute 
in lieu thereof the following: 

"(5) A vegetated buffer between the tract being built upon and abutting lots shall be 
required by the Board only if it determines that a buffer is necessary to protect 
significant natural features and to achieve the harmonious integration of the 
proposed development with surrounding properties."; and 

Add a new paragraph "(6)", said paragraph to read as follows: 

"(6) The Planning Board may waive any of the above dimensional requirements if it 
determines that such action would not be inconsistent with the purpose of this 
Open Space Preservation Zoning section."; and 

5) Amend "6. Common Driveways ", as follows: 

Amend "(e) (4) Grade" by deleting "10% maximum" and substituting in lieu thereof 
"14% maximum"; and 

Add, to the end of paragraph "(e)", the following sentence: "Further, the Planning 
Board may waive strict compliance with the width and pavement requirements if it 
deterrnines that such a waiver can be granted without adversely affecting public 
access."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Associate Planning Board member David Santomenna moved that the Town vote to 
amend 'THE PROTECTIVE ZONING BYLAW OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" as 
presented in Article 9 of the Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town 
Meeting, with the following change: under 4), amend paragraph (6) by adding, after 

39 



the words 'The Planning Board", the words, "by special permit". Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board and Growth Management 
Steering Committee unanimously recommended. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by: 

1) Amending SECTION V. USE SCHEDULE . Table of Use Regulations , by 

Deleting, under the IR column, for the uses "Single -family detached dwelling" and 
'Two-family dwelling", the footnote "18", and substituting in lieu thereof footnote 
"22.", said footnote to read as follows: 

"22. By special permit, the Planning Board may allow two principal buildings on a 
lot, provided that the lot contains: (a) only one existing single-family or two-family 
dwelling at the time of application; and (b) the proposed additional single-family 
detached dwelling is located entirely within the envelope of an accessory building in 
existence on the effective date of this amendment, except for dormers or other 
appurtenances related to the conversion of a non-residential building to a dwelling 
unit."; and 

2) Revising VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS by amending 
B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations as follows: 

Within the "Intown Residence" row, for the use "Single-family detached", add a 
footnote "26." to the value "10,000", said footnote to read as follows: 

"26. For undeveloped lots, held separately or combined with an adjoining lot, which 
conform to the original subdivision layout, have at least 5,000 square feet of area 
and at least fifty feet of street frontage, and upon which no house has been built, 
the rninirnum square footage requirement for a detached single-family dwelling may 
be reduced by 50% by special permit from the Planning Board, provided that the 
proposed dwelling does not exceed 1,800 square feet of floor area and satisfies all of 
the dimensional requirements of the Intown Residence (IR) District."; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Robert Weatherall moved that the Town vote to amend 
'THE PROTECTIVE ZONING BYLAW OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" as presented in 
Article 10 of the Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town Meeting, with the 
following changes: 

40 



under 1), delete the words " Amending SECTION V. USE SCHEDULE, Table of Use 
Regulations, by Deleting, under the IR column, for the uses 'Single-family detached 
dwelling' and Two-family dwelling', the footnote T8', and substituting in lieu thereof 
footnote '22', said footnote to read as follows:", and replace it with the following: 

"Amending SECTION V. USE SCHEDULE as follows: amend the Table of Use 
Regulations by adding, under the IR column, for the uses 'Single -family detached 
dwelling' and Two-family dwelling', the footnote '23', said footnote to read as 
follows:"; and 

amend the language of footnote 23. by adding, after "(b)", the following sentences, to 
read as follows: "In considering the special permit application, the Planning Board 
will not find that the proposal satisfies the special permit criterion 'Social, 
economic, or community needs served by the proposal' (SECTION XI .J . 2. a.), unless 
the applicant provides a mechanism to achieve long-term affordability. To the 
extent feasible, the Planning Board may provide, or cause the Town to provide, a 
financial subsidy to assist the applicant in satisfying this objective."; and 

add, after the above language, the following: 

under the FOOTNOTES TO USE REGULATIONS, by amending footnote 18 as 
follows: "adding, after "Not more than one principal building per lot," the words: ", 
except as provided in footnote 23."; and 

under 2), amend the language of footnote 26. by changing the number of the 
footnote from "26." to "25.", and by deleting from the language of the footnote the 
words "by 50%". Seconded. 

Planning Board, Growth Management Steering Committee, Board of Selectmen and 
Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 

Carl Gardner moved that Article 10 be divided into its two parts and that each part 
be considered and voted on separately. Seconded. 

The simple majority voice vote on the amendment failed. 

Seven voters stood to question the voice vote on the amendment. 

On a hand count with 63 voting in favor and 177 voting against, the amendment to 
divide the motion failed to pass. 

On a hand count with 149 voting in favor and 91 voting against, the main motion 
failed the required 2/3's majority vote. 

41 



ARTICLE 1 1 

To see if the Town will vote: 

1) to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich by: 

a) revising SECTION IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS, I. Inclusionarv Housing 
Requirements as follows^ 

Amend "2. Applicability" by deleting this section in its entirety and substituting in 
lieu thereof the following: 

"2. Applicability 

a. Any multi-family residential development subject to approval 
by special permit, and any other residential development 
for which the developer requests a special permit, waiver, 
variance or other local approval that would increase the 
density or intensity of use of such proposed development 
above what would otherwise be allowed, shall be subject to 
the provisions of this Subsection I. 

b. Any proposed residential development in the RRA, RRB, 
and RRC Districts that would create two or more single- 
family detached or attached dwellings may receive a 50% 
reduction of the rninirnurn lot size requirement listed in the 
Table of Use Regulations (SECTION VI by complying with 
the requirements of subsection 3.b. or 3.c below."; and 

Amend "3. Requirements" by deleting this section in its entirety and substituting in 
lieu thereof the following: 

"3. Requirements 

a. Multi-family Residential Development 

(1) Ten percent of the units in any multi-family residential development of 
ten units or more (the "Affordable Housing Units") requiring a special 
permit shall be sold or rented to households with incomes at or below 
80 percent of the Median Regional Household Income (as determined 
by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 
pursuant to the Housing Act of 1937, as amended and adjusted for 
family size), and shall be restricted to sales prices or monthly rents 
that are affordable to such households. For purposes of this bylaw, 
rental housing shall be deemed affordable if rents (including utilities or 
a HUD-approved utility allowance if utilities are paid separately by 

42 



tenants) do not exceed 30 percent of 70 percent of the gross monthly 
Median Regional Household Income for a family of four. For-sale 
housing shall be deemed affordable for purposes of this bylaw if it is 
priced so that monthly principal, interest, tax, and property insurance 
costs and condominium fees (if applicable) do not exceed 33 percent of 
70 percent of gross monthly Median Regional Household Income for a 
family of four, using the best generally available mortgage terms and 
rates for such borrowers. Where the application of this formula results 
in a fractional housing unit, a fraction of one half of a dwelling unit or 
more shall be considered as one Affordable Housing Unit. 

(2) For multi-family residential developments of less than ten units 

requiring a special permit, the applicant shall, in consideration of such 
permit, provide either one Affordable Housing Unit in accordance with 
3.a.(l),4.,5., and 6. of this Section I., or pay a fee to the Town to 
provide affordable housing in Ipswich. The fee shall be calculated on a 
pro rata basis, and shall be $10,000 per unit for developments up to 
nine units. The fee may be adjusted by the Planning Board from time 
to time through the issuance of guidelines or regulations. Such 
adjustments shall reflect both changes in the median contract price for 
newly constructed homes in the Northeast U.S., as reported annually 
by the U.S. Census Bureau, and changes in the maximum sales price 
for single-family homes developed for sale to households at or below 80 
percent of Median Regional Household Income through programs 
administered by the Massachusetts Department of Housing and 
Community Development. 

b. Single-Family Developments of Ten or More Dwellings 

Applicants developing ten or more residential single-family detached or 
attached dwellings in the RRA or RRB Districts may receive, by 
Planning Board special permit, a 50% reduction of the minimum lot 
size requirement listed in the Table of Use Regulations (SECTION V .) 
by complying with the following requirements: 

(1) provide ten percent of the units in accordance with 3.a.(l), 4., 5., 
and 6. of this Subsection I.; and 

(2) obtain an Open Space Preservation Zoning special permit in 
accordance with the provisions of SECTION IX. A. of this bylaw. 

c. Single-Family Developments of Less than Ten Units 

Applicants developing fewer than ten residential single-family detached 
or attached dwelling units in the RRA and RRB Districts may receive, by 
Planning Board special permit, a 50% reduction of the minimum lot size 

43 



requirement listed in the Table of Use Regulations (SECTION V .) by 
complying with the following requirements: 

(1) Provide an Affordable Housing Unit in accordance with 3.a.(l), 4., 5., 
and 6. of this SECTION I .; or provide an affordable housing fee in 
accordance with 3. a. (2) of this SECTION I .: and 

(2) obtain an Open Space Preservation Zoning special permit in 
accordance with the provisions of SECTION IX.A . of this bylaw, 
unless the development creates fewer than five total dwelling units. 

d. Subdivision Approval 

Any development application submitted under the provisions of this 
subsection that involves the subdivision of land shall also be subject to 
the approval of the Planning Board under the Rules and Regulations 
Governing the Subdivision of Land in Ipswich. 

e. Special Permit Approval 

Applicants seeking a Planning Board special permit to receive a 50% 
reduction of the niinirnurn lot size shall conform with the requirements 
of SECTION XI. ADMINISTRATION, J. Special Permits , except for 
paragraph 2. Criteria. To issue a special permit for a 50% reduction of 
minimum lot size, the Planning Board needs only to find that the 
applicant satisfies the applicable requirements of this Subsection I., 
paragraph 3."; and 

Amend "4. Conditions of Approval", paragraph "a. Continued Affordability" by 
deleting this section in its entirety and substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"a. Continued Affordability 

Affordable housing units developed pursuant to this bylaw shall be subject to long- 
term use restrictions and, where applicable, resale restrictions, to ensure that they 
remain affordable to low- and moderate-income households for the longest period 
deemed practicable by the Planning Board, but in no event less than thirty years. 
Such restrictions shall be enforceable by the Town of Ipswich or by a housing- 
related charitable corporation or trust designed by the Town of Ipswich in 
accordance with sections 31 and 32 of Chapter 184 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws and shall be executed and recorded at the Essex County Registry of Deeds, 
Southern District. It is the intent of this bylaw that affordable housing units be 
restricted and that long-term affordability be enforced in such a manner that 
affordable units are considered "low and moderate income housing" for purposes of 
Section 20 of Chapter 40B of the Massachusetts General Laws."; and 

Amend "4. Conditions of Approval" by adding paragraph "d. Alternative 

44 



Requirements", said paragraph to read as follows: 

"d. Alternative Requirements 

The Planning Board may reduce the required percentage of affordable 
housing units from ten percent to not less than five percent of the units 
permitted if such Affordable Housing Units are sold or rented at prices 
affordable to households at or below fifty (50%) percent of the Median 
Regional Household Income. The Planning Board may also increase the 
required percentage of affordable housing units from ten percent to not 
more than fifteen percent of the permitted units if it determines that federal, 
state or local subsidies are available to defray the cost to the applicant of 
providing any affordable units in excess often percent."; and 

2) Amend SECTION V. USE SCHEDULE, Table of Use Regulations , by adding the 
footnote "25." to the minimum lot size requirement for single-family detached or 
attached dwellings in the RRA, RRB, and RRC columns, said footnote to read as 
follows: 

"25. The Planning Board may reduce by special permit the minimum lot area by not 
more than fifty (50%) percent, provided that the lot is developed in accordance 
with SECTION IX I: 3.: and 

3) Amend SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS, B. Table of 
Dimensional and Density Regulations as follows: 



Amend the "Rural Residence" District rows, by deleting the dimensional 
requirements assigned to the uses listed under it, and substituting in lieu thereof 
the dimensional requirements as shown in the following table.; and 

4) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the Massachusetts General Court 
to establish an Affordable Housing Fund, said fund to be used for the purpose of 
creating and maintaining affordable housing in the Town of Ipswich.; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Charles Allen moved that the Town vote to amend 'THE 
PROTECTIVE ZONING BYLAW OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" as presented in Article 
1 1 of the Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town Meeting, with the 
following changes: 

under 1) a): amend "2. Applicability" by adding, before the first "a." and "b.", the 
words 'The requirements of this subsection I. apply to:"; amend "2. a." by deleting, 
after "...approval by special permit", the remainder of the sentence; amend "2.b." 
by deleting the words "may receive a 50% reduction of the rninimum lot size 
requirement listed in the Table of Use Regulations (SECTION V .) by complying with 

45 



the requirements of subsection 3.b. or 3.c. below.", and substituting in lieu thereof 
the words "for which compliance with this subsection I. is required in the Table of 
Dimensional and Density Regulations i SECTION VI . 1 Developments that create only 
one single-family detached or attached dwelling are exempt from the provisions of 
subsection I., provided that a suitable restriction is recorded at the Essex South 
Registry of Deeds prohibiting the creation of additional units on the property.": 
amend the first paragraphs of "3.b." and "3.c." by deleting the words "residential 
single-family detached or attached dwellings" and substituting in lieu thereof the 
words "Single -family detached or attached dwellings", and by deleting the words 
"may receive, by Planning Board special permit, a 50% reduction of the minimum 
lot size requirement listed in the Table of Use Regulations (SECTION V .) by 
complying", and substituting in lieu thereof the words, "shall comply"; and amend 
"3.e." by deleting it in its entirety; 

delete 2) in its entirety; 

amend 3) by renumbering to 2) and adding, after its last sentence, the following: 

revising the "Rural Residence rows" as shown in the TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND 
DENSITY REGULATIONS as follows: 

under the Use column: add the additional uses "Single-family detached" and 
"Single-family attached" in the RRA, RRC, and RRB rows; 

under the Minimum Lot Area column, for the uses "Single-family detached" and 
"Single -family attached" in the RRA, RRC, and RRB rows, delete footnote "25" and 
replace with footnote "26"; for the uses "Single-family detached" and "Single -family 
attached" in the RRA, RRC, and RRB rows, add "43,560 27 " and "See IX.A 27 " 
respectively; 

under the remaining columns, for the uses "Single-family detached" and "Single- 
family attached" in the RRA, RRC, and RRB rows, add the same values as listed 
under the remaining columns for the uses "Single-family detached" and "Single- 
family attached". 

"Adding footnote "26." to the uses "Single-family detached" and "Single-family 
attached" dwellings in the RRA, RRB, and RRC rows, under the "Minimum Lot 
Area" column, said footnote to read as follows: 

'26. If a residential development obtains a special permit, waiver, variance or other 
local approval that increases the density or intensity of use beyond what is allowed 
by this requirement, said development shall conform to SECTION IX.I. (Inclusionary 
Housing Requirements)'; and 

Adding footnote "27." to the uses "Single-family detached" and "Single -family 
attached" dwellings in the RRA, RRB, and RRC rows, under the "Minimum Lot 

46 



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Area" column, said footnote to read as follows: 

'27. This requirement shall apply to all developments that fulfill the requirements of 
SECTION IX. I. (Inclusionary Housing Requirements), and to all conforming lots in 
existence as of the effective date of this bylaw.'; and 

re-number 4) to 3). Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Growth Management 
Steering Committee unanimously recommended. 

On a hand count with 181 voting in favor and 30 voting against, the motion carried 
by more than the required 2/3's majority vote. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich 
by: 

Rezoning all property located within the "Rural Residence C (RRC) District" to the 
"Rural Residence A (RRA) District", with the exception of four parcels identified as 
Lot 39 on Assessor's Map 13, and Lots 28, 29 and 29A on Assessor's Map 21, which 
shall remain in the RRC District; and 

Rezoning the following areas from Industrial (I) to Business (B): 

The area beginning at the intersection of Saltonstall Street and Estes Street; thence 
southerly along Estes Street; thence easterly along southern property line of Lot 
186; then northerly along the Ipswich River; then westerly along the Sylvania Dam; 
thence westerly through Lot 186; thence westerly along Saltonstall Street, as shown 
on the map on the following page; said area is further defined as a portion of lot 186 
on Assessor's Map 42A; and 

The area beginning at the intersection of Hammatt Street and Brown Square, thence 
westerly along Brown Square, to property line of Lot 270; thence southerly along the 
property line between Lots 270 and 271 ; thence westerly along Boston and Maine 
railroad way; thence southerly along western boundary of Lot 82; thence easterly 
along Brown Street; thence southerly along Mineral Street; thence easterly along 
Washington Street; thence southerly along property line between Lots 217 and 218; 
thence easterly along property line of Lots 203 through 207, and Lot 215, thence 
westerly along railroad way; through Depot Square; thence westerly along Hammatt 
Street, as shown on the map on the following page; said area is further defined as 
including the entirety of Lots 217, 242A, 244, 273-280, and portions of Lots 271, 
272, and 281, Assessor's Map 4 IB; and 

Rezoning a portion of Lot 82 on Assessor's Map 30D from Industrial (I) to In-town 

48 



PROPOSED REZONING 

FROM 

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TO RURAL RESIDENCE A (RRA) 




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Residence (IR), as shown on the following page; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Robert Weatherall moved that the Town vote to amend 
"THE PROTECTIVE ZONING BYLAW OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" and the 
"OFFICIAL ZONING MAP OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH," both as presented in Article 
12 of the Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Planning Board unanimously recommended. The Finance 
Committee voted 8 in favor with 1 abstention. 

Several voters spoke in favor and against the motion. 

The question was moved, seconded and so voted. 

On a hand count with 176 voting in favor and 8 voting against, the motion carried 
by the required 2/3's vote. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw and the Official 
Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich by: 

Revising SECTION IV. ZONING DISTRICTS as follows: 

Amend "A. Type of Districts " by adding "3. Neartown Residence (NR) District"; and 

Amend "B. Intent of Districts " by 

adding, in the correct numerical order, "2. Neartown Residence (NR) District", to 
read as follows: 

"2. The Neartown Residence District is intended primarily for residential uses in the 
areas located on the outskirts of the town center and generally situated between the 
Intown Residence District and the Rural Residence District. The predominantly 
permitted uses are single-family and two-family residences. Community facilities 
necessary to service the residential uses are permitted, but commercial and 
industrial uses are generally not permitted. The district is generally served by 
municipal water supply and sewerage facilities."; and 

renumbering "3." through "9.", accordingly; and 

Amending SECTION V. USE SCHEDULE , Table of Use Regulations , by 

adding, after the RRB column, the "NR" column, and by assigning to it the following 

prohibitions and allowances: 

52 



TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 

PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 

NR 
RESIDENTIAL 

Single-family detached dwelling P 18 

Two-family dwelling SBA 18 
Multi-family dwelling 

Bed & Breakfast Home SPB 

Dormitory, resident fraternity or sorority SPB 
Mobile home for permanent residency 

Mobile home for temporary residency SBA 1 

Open Space Preservation Zoning SPB 
Conversion of existing dwelling into 

bed & breakfast home SPB 
Temporary Living Facility 

Great Estate Preservation Development SPB 

Common Driveway P 

COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

Church and other religious purpose P 

Educational purpose which is 

religious, sectarian, denomina- 
tional, public, or non-profit P 
Educational purpose which is 

operated for profit, except 

nursery school 
Child care facilities P 2 

Town governmental building except 

equipment garage SBA 

Town equipment garage 
Expansion of existing town or non- 
profit cemetery, including an 

crematory therein SBA 

Town outdoor recreation facility and 

any other outdoor non-commercial 

recreation use such as private 

boathouses and landings P 3 

Historical, philanthropic, or 

charitable association or society P 

Town power plant, wastewater 

treatment facility, water treatment 

plant, sludge composting facility, 

sanitary landfill, refuse incinerator, 

recycling center, transfer station, 

or any other treatment or waste 

54 



TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 

PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 

NR 



related facility SPB 

Municipal parking lot or structure 
Street, bridge, vehicular tunnel, or rail- 
road lines P 
Facilities as needed for essential 

community services P 

Private utility overhead transmission 

line, substation or similar facility or 

building 
Gardens, orchards, nurseries, and 

silviculture P 

Greenhouses and farms including 

the raising, keeping, slaughter, 

and dressing of livestock or other 

farm animals 
on five (5) acres or more P 

on less than five (5) acres SBA 

Sale of farm, horticulture, and 

nursery products, on a wholesale 

or retail basis SBA 4 

The following uses, if commercial: 

Kennel, stable, livery stable, riding 

academy, or veterinary hospital SBA 5 

Performing arts center SPB 

COMMERCIAL 

Retail establishment selling principally 

convenience goods including but not 

limited to: food, drugs & proprietary goods SBA 6 

Retail establishment selling general 

merchandise, including but not 

limited to dry goods, apparel and 

accessories, furniture and home 

furnishings, home equipment, small 

wares, and hardware, and including 

discount and limited price variety stores 
Eating and drinking places, excluding 

fast food establishments, which 

provide seating for at least sixteen 

persons within the building 
Formula fast food establishments which 



55 



17 



TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 

PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 

NR 

provide seating for at least sixteen persons 

within the building. 21 
Establishment selling and /or renting 

new and /or used automobiles, trucks, 

aircraft, boats, motorcycles, and house- 
hold and camping trailers, and enclosed 

repair facilities accessory thereto 
Establishment selling motor vehicle parts 

and accessories 
Establishment for repair and/or service 

of new and/or used automobiles, trucks, 

aircraft, boats, motorcycles, small engines, 

and household and camping trailers (not 

including a junkyard or open storage of 

abandoned motor vehicles) 
Hotels and Motels 
Inn, including conversion of an existing 

dwelling into an inn SBA 

Bed & breakfast establishment, including 

conversion of an existing dwelling into a 

bed & breakfast establishment SPB 

Personal & consumer service establishment 
Funeral establishment 
Rest homes, convalescent home, or 

nursing homes for the elderly or infirm SBA 7 

Hospital, or medical or dental clinic 

Membership club SBA 

Miscellaneous professional and business 

offices and services including, but not 

limited to, medical, legal, or other pro- 
fessional services and finance, banking, 

insurance and real estate offices 
Miscellaneous business repair services, 

including, but not necessarily limited to, 

appliances, televisions, computers, and 

office equipment 
Motion picture establishment, indoor only 
Other amusement and recreation 

service, indoor only 
Country, fishing, tennis, boating, 
golfing, or similar club 

56 



TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 

PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 

NR 

Commercial parking lot or struc- 
ture including a public garage 

Shopping center 

Golf driving range, miniature golf, and/or 
batting cage 

Mini- storage warehouses 

Campground 

Assisted Living or Life Care Facility SPB 

Adult Entertainment Establishment 

WHOLESALE, TRANSPORTATION AND INDUSTRIAL 
Removal of sand, gravel, or loam 
Newspaper printing and job printing 
Processing and treating of raw 

materials not enclosed, including 

operations appurtenant to the 

removal, such as grading, drying, 

sorting, crushing, grinding, and 

milling operations 
Research offices or establishments 

devoted to research and development 

activities SBA 

Enclosed manufacturing or processing 
Enclosed construction uses including 

materials and equipment storage and 

supplies 
Bakery, laundry, or dry cleaning plant 
Bus and/or railroad passenger stations 

and any other passenger transport- 
ation services 
Wholesale trade, warehousing and 

distribution 
Open storage of raw materials, finished 

goods, or construction equipment and 

structures for storing such equipment 

ACCESSORY USE 

In-law apartment (Added 4/5/99; 8/2/99AG) SBA 

Non-habitable solar energy collection 

apparatus p 

Home occupation P 9 

57 



TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 
PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 



NR 

Child care facilities P 2 

Private guesthouse, toolshed, play- 
house, tennis court, boat house, or 
other similar accessory structure; 
storage of boats and boat trailers; 
private garage for motor vehicles, or 
no more than one vehicle owned by a 

non-resident of the premises P 

Accessory off-street parking and 

loading facilities P 

Unregistered motor vehicles: 

One (1) not in an enclosed building P 

More than one (1) not in an enclosed 
building, but limited to one (1) per 
each whole acre in the Rural 
Residence zone 
Up to four (4) all within an enclosed 

building P 

More than four (4) in an enclosed 

building SBA 10 

Accessory outside storage clearly 
necessary to the operation and 
conduct of a permitted principal 
wholesale, transportation, industrial 
and/or commercial use, provided: 
it shall be screened from view out- 
side the premises P 
Newsstand, barber shop, dining room 
or cafeteria, and similar accessory 
services primarily for occupants or 
users thereof within a hotel, office, 
industrial building, assisted living 

facility, life care facility, or hospital SBA 

Landfill, dredging, or draining P 

Signs P 

Gardens, orchards, nurseries, or 

silviculture P 

Keeping, raising, and breeding of farm 
animals, such as poultry, horses, live- 
stock or other farm animals, or insects 
for use only by residents of the premises 

58 



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59 



TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 

PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 

NR 

on one (1) acre or more P 

on less than one (1) acre SBA 

Fine arts instructional programs SBA 1 ' 

In-ground swimming pools P 13 

Wastewater Plant or Package 

Wastewater Plant or Power Plant SPB 

Storage Trailers, Temporary Use P 12 

Storage Trailers, Permanent Use 

and 

(3) Revising VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS as follows: 

Amend B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations by: 

After the row "Rural Residence", add the "Neartown Residence" row, and 
assign the dimensional requirements shown on the table on the following page 
to the uses listed under it; and 

Amend B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations, Accessory Buildings and 
Structures by: 

Adding, under District, after "Rural Residence B (RRB)" and before "Intown 
Residence (IR)", a new District, "Neartown Residence (NR)", and assigning the 
following rninirnurn setback requirements: 

TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS 

ACCESSORY BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES 

MINIMUM 
SETBACKS 
FRONT 17 SIDE 27 REAR 277 

DISTRICT USE (FOOT) (FOOT) (FOOT) 

Neartown Residence Accessory 20 5 10 

(NR) Buildings & 

Structures 17 ; and 



60 



(4) amending SECTION VIII. SIGNS , D. Sign Requirements per Zoning District as 

follows: 

In paragraph 1., after the phrase "In Rural Residence A, B, C;" add "Neartown 
Residence," 

In paragraph 2., after the phrase "In Rural Residence A, B, and C;" add ", 
Neartown Residence"; and 

(5) amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich by: 

Rezoning the following areas from "Rural Residence A (RRA)" to "Neartown 
Residence District (NR)": 

The area beginning at intersection of Wainwright Street and Sawyer Street; 
thence easterly along Sawyer Street to Cogswell Street; southerly along 
Cogswell Street to East Street; and easterly along East Street to approximately 
420 feet beyond its intersection with Newmarch Street and Jeffrey's Neck 
Road, as shown on the following map. The area is further described as 
including all or portions of the following lots (Assessor's Maps dated 1/1/01): 

Assessor's Map Lots 

31C 134 (partial), 136-139, 142-148; 

31D 8-12, 14-26, 30A, 31, 95 (partial); 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Joshua Massey moved that the Town vote to amend 'THE 
PROTECTIVE ZONING BYLAW OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" as presented in Article 
13 of the Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town Meeting, with the 
following change: delete "(5)" in its entirety. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. 

Coco McCabe, Carl Gardner, Chris Cullen and Debra Jacobson spoke against the 
motion. Joshua Massey and Robert Weatherall spoke in favor of the motion. 

On a hand count with 75 voting in favor and 109 voting against, the motion failed to 
pass. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by amending SECTION X. SITE PLAN REVIEW as follows: 



61 



Amend B. Applicability by deleting the paragraph in its entirety and substituting in 
lieu thereof the following: 

"B. Applicability 

The following types of activities and uses require site plan review by the 
Planning Board: 

1 . Construction of any new community facility, commercial, industrial or 
business building; or any additions or alterations in excess of 2,500 square 
feet or thirty (30) percent of the existing gross floor area, whichever is less, 
which has been constructed within the consecutive two-year period; 

2. Construction of any drive-through facility; 

3. Any change of use which increases the parking requirement by ten spaces 
and/or triggers the requirement of a new loading zone; and 

4. Grading, clearing, or other non-residential land development activity except 
for the following: work incidental to agricultural activities; clearing 
necessary for percolation and other site tests; or work in conjunction with 
an earth removal permit."; and 

Amend " C. General Standards " by adding "10." and "11.", to read as follows: 

"10. Visual impact of parking, storage or other outdoor service areas"; and 

"11. Consistency with character and scale of surrounding buildings"; and 

by adding the following sentence after these standards: "Applicants are 
encouraged to review the Board's rules and regulations for guidance on how 
to satisfy the above standards."; and 

Amend "D. Submission Procedure " as follows: 

Modify paragraph "1." by deleting the third, fourth, and fifth sentences and 
substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"Depending on the nature of the application, the designee may 
encourage the applicant to meet with the Planning Board prior to 
making a formal submission of plans, to discuss site plan requirements 
and possible waivers. The Board may provide a set of guidelines to 
assist the applicant in meeting site plan, architectural, and landscaping 
objectives. The applicant shall submit an application and fee to the 
Planning Board, a copy of which application shall forthwith be filed by 
the applicant with the Town Clerk."; and 

62 



Revise paragraph "3." by adding, to the end of the first sentence, the following 
phrase: 

", unless the site plan review application is submitted coincident with a 
Planning Board special permit application, in which case the site plan review 
submission shall be acted upon within the same time period as the special 
permit application."; and 

Amend "E. Submission Requirements " by adding subparagraphs "o." and "p.", said 
subparagraphs to read as follows: 

"o. An elevation plan of all proposed buildings, including proposed building 
materials and fagade treatment; and 

p. Location of wetlands, streams, waterbodies, areas subject to flooding and unique 
site features such as specimen trees, viewsheds from public ways, eskers and 
other glacial features, and historic buildings and sites."; and 

Amend "H. Waiver" by adding, after the words "The Board may waive ... any of the 
preceding requirements", the following words: "or any of the dimensional, parking, 
or screening requirements of this bylaw."; and 

Reletter paragraphs "I." and "J." to "N." and "O.", respectively; and 

Add new paragraphs "I" - "M", said paragraphs to read as follows: 

"I. Compliance 

1 . Site plan review approval granted under this Section shall lapse within two years 
of the date of approval if a substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced. 
Such approval may, for good cause, be extended by the Planning Board upon the 
written request of the applicant, provided that any application for extension is 
submitted before the two years have expired. 

2. Except as described in 3. below, no final occupancy permit shall be issued for 
any building or structure, or portion(s) thereof, until: 

a. The Building Inspector receives certification from a registered architect, 
engineer or land surveyor, that all construction, including utilities, has 
been done in accordance with the approved site plan; and 

b. The Building Inspector verifies that all conditions of the approved site plan 
have been met. 

3. Occupancy permits may be issued for a portion of any building or structure, if 

63 



the only incomplete work shown on the site plan is landscaping and /or roadway top 
course, and surety in an amount approved by the Planning Board is posted to 
ensure that the incomplete landscaping and/or roadway top course is completed 
within a reasonable time. The Planning Board may allow surety to be posted for site 
work in addition to landscaping and the roadway top course, if an unusual or 
unexpected event prevents the applicant from completing the site work. ; and 

J. Maintenance 

All accessways, parking areas, fences, walls, landscaping, lighting, drainage, and 
waste disposal areas shall be adequately maintained and repaired or replaced 
wherever and whenever necessary to insure continued compliance with the 
approved site plan."; and 

K. Site Lighting 

Accessways, parking areas, and pedestrian walkways shall have adequate lighting 
for security and safety reasons. Lighting shall be arranged and shielded so as to 
prevent glare from the site shining onto abutting properties and into the sky."; and 

L. Site Landscaping 

Site landscaping shall conform to the requirements of SECTION VI. E. as well as the 
requirements of this Section. The imnimum total square feet of landscaping for any 
project approved under this Section shall be twenty (20%) percent of the total 
impervious surface of the proposed project. The calculated square footage shall be 
marked clearly on the submitted site plan. Landscaping shall be provided in the 
following areas of the site: 

1. foundation plantings at entry and at building facade facing roadways; 

2. parking lot interior (such as planting islands); 

3. screening parking areas, loading areas, rubbish removal bins, and outside 
storage, if applicable; 

4. street line plantings, and perimeter lot line plantings, where applicable.; 
and 

M. Modifications to Approved Site Plans 

To request a modification to an approved site plan, an applicant shall submit to the 
Planning Board a written description of the proposed modifications. Modiiled site 
plans will, in most instances, be subject to the same submittal, review and hearing 
procedures as was the original filing. If the Board determines that a particular 

6* 



modification is not significant and is consistent with the previously approved site 
plan, the Board may decide not to hold an additional public hearing."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board Chairman Leslie Brooks moved that the Town vote to amend 'THE 
PROTECTIVE ZONING BYLAW OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" as presented in Article 
14 of the Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town Meeting, with the 
following change: delete the paragraph beginning with "Amend 'H. Waiver' by 
adding" in its entirety. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Planning Board unanimously 
recommended. 

On a hand count with 156 voting in favor and 4 voting against, the motion carried 
by more than the required 2/3's vote. 

ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich 
by changing the boundaries of Water Supply District A in the vicinity of Fellows, 
Essex, Candlewood, and Sagamore Roads, from its current delineation to one that is 
shown on the attached plan entitled "Figure 7-1 Wellhead Protection Zone, Essex 
and Fellows Road Wells (PWS-3144000-06G & 07G)". Said plan is on file in the 
office of the Town Clerk and the Department of Planning & Development.; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board Chairman Leslie Brooks moved that the Town vote to amend 'THE 
OFFICIAL ZONING MAP OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" by changing the boundaries 
of Water Supply District A in the vicinity of Fellows, Essex, Candlewood, and 
Sagamore Roads, from its current delineation to one that is shown on the attached 
plan entitled "Figure 7- 1 Wellhead Protection Zone, Essex and Fellows Road Wells 
(PWS-3 144000-06G&07G)". Said plan is on file in the office of the Town Clerk and 
the Department of Planning & Development; all as proposed in Article 15 of the 
Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Planning Board unanimously 
recommended. 

The Moderator allowed Blake Martin (a non-voter) to speak to the voters on this 
article. Mr. Martin explained the study that was completed for the town by 
"Geosphere", a company selected and supervised by the Commonwealth DEP. 

Robert Lowe, 38 Fellows Road, spoke against the changes in the boundaries. The 
Moderator allowed Mr. Lowe's engineer (a non-voter) to speak to the voters on this 
article. The engineer explained the study he completed on this Water Supply 

65 









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66 



District for a group of residents from Fellows Road. 

David Standley, Jamie Fay, James Engel and Glenn Gibbs spoke in favor of the 
motion. Catherine Savoie spoke against the motion. 

The question was moved, seconded and so voted. 

On a hand count with 136 voting in favor and 26 voting against, the motion carried 
by the required 2/3's vote. 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by amending SECTION IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS, G. Wireless 
Communications Facilities as follows: 

Amend "5. Design Standards" by adding a new paragraph "i", said paragraph to 
read as follows: 

"i. If the proposed free-standing facility is located in a wooded area, a vegetated 
buffer strip of undisturbed trees shall be retained for at least fifty (50) feet in width 
around the entire perimeter of the proposed facility, except for the access road. The 
Planning Board may require surety to cover the cost of remediation if any landscape 
is damaged during site clearing."; and 

Amend "6. Special Permit" as follows: 

Amend "a. Application Process (1)" by adding subparagraph "(e)", said 
subparagraph to read as follows: 

"e. Written documentation that the applicant has examined all wireless 
facility sites in Ipswich and abutting towns within five miles of any boundary 
of the Town to determine whether those existing sites can be used to provide 
adequate coverage and/or capacity to the Town of Ipswich. [For the purposes 
of this section, adequate coverage shall be that area surrounding a base 
station where the predicted or measured median field strength of the 
transmitted signal is >-95dbm. Portions within the area of adequate coverage 
may have a signal <-95dbm, provided that the signal regains its strength to 
>-95dbm further away from the base station. Capacity is considered to be 
'adequate' if the grade of service is p. 05 or better for at least 50% of the days 
in a preceding month, prior to the date of application, as measured using 
direct traffic measurement of the WCF in question, where the call blocking is 
due to frequency contention at the antenna(s)]. The documentation shall 
include, for each facility site listed, the exact location (in longitude and 
latitude), ground elevation, height of the facility, output frequency, number of 
channels, power input, and maximum output per channel. Potential 

67 



adjustments to these sites, including changes in antenna type, orientation, 
gain, and height or power output, shall be specified. 

The documentation shall also analyze the feasibility of repeaters, in 
conjunction with all facility sites in Ipswich and abutting towns, to provide 
adequate coverage and/or capacity to the Town of Ipswich. [For purposes of 
this section, repeaters shall mean a small receiver/ relay transmitter of not 
more than 20 watts output designed to provide service to areas which are not 
able to receive adequate coverage directly from a base station.] Radial plots of 
all potential repeaters and/or facility sites, as they exist and as adjusted, 
shall also be provided."; and 

Reletter M b." and "c." to "c." and "d.", respectively, and add a new subparagraph "b.", 
to read as follows: 

"b. Review of Alternative Sites 

At the Planning Board's request, the Applicant shall examine alternative sites 
for the location of a wireless facility. Said alternative sites may be identified 
by the Planning Board, and /or by the Applicant. The purpose of such 
analysis is to help the Board determine whether alternative sites to the one 
proposed in the application better satisfy the requirements of 6.b.(l) of this 
Section."; and 

Add a new subparagraph "e.", to read as follows: 

"e. Provision of Independent Consultants 

Upon receipt of a special permit application, the Planning Board may hire 
independent consultants, at the applicant's cost, to help it determine whether 
the application satisfies paragraph 6.b.(l) of this Section. The applicant's 
signature on the special permit application shall constitute the applicant's 
agreement to pay such charges. These consultants shall each be qualified 
professionals with a record of service to municipalities in one of the following 
fields: telecommunications engineering; civil engineering; structural 
engineering; land use planning; and /or landscape architecture. The Town of 
Ipswich reserves all assignable rights in contract against the applicant, 
including the right to interest, legal fees, and costs of collection, in the event 
that the applicant fails to make timely payment."; and 

Add a new paragraph, "8.", said paragraph to read as follows: 

"8. Monitoring and Evaluation of Compliance 

Within thirty days of initial operation of the approved WCF, the Applicant shall pay 
for an Independent Consultant hired by the Town to monitor the background levels 

68 



of Electromagnetic Frequency Radiation (EMF) emissions from the proposed facility 
site and/or repeater locations. The Independent Consultant shall use Monitoring 
Protocol. A report of monitoring results shall be prepared by the Independent 
Consultant and submitted to the Planning Board and the Board of Health. 

If the monitoring of the facility site reveals that the site exceeds the FCC 96-326 
standard, then the owners of all facilities using the site shall be so notified. The 
owner(s) shall submit to the Planning Board and the Building Inspector a plan for 
reduction of emissions to a level that complies with the FCC 96-326 standard within 
ten business days of notification of non-compliance. That plan shall reduce 
emissions to the standard within 15 days of initial notification."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Joshua Massey moved that the Town vote to amend 'THE 
PROTECTIVE ZONING BYLAW OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" as presented in Article 
16 of the Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

The quorum was questioned. Mr. Engel moved to adjourn the meeting to Tuesday, 
October 16 th at 7:30 p.m. Seconded. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. The 
meeting was adjourned at 11:10 p.m. 

October 16. 2001 - Second night of the Special Town Meeting 

At 8: 15 p.m., the Moderator announced that there was no quorum. Motion to 
adjourn the meeting was seconded and so voted. The meeting was adjourned to 
Tuesday, October 23 rd at the Town Hall at 25 Green Street at 7:30 p.m. On the 
second night there were 132 voters checked in at 8:00 p.m. (Quorum-200) 

October 23, 2001 - Third night of the Special Town Meeting 

The following town officials convened at the Town Hall, 25 Green Street: Town 
Manager, George Howe, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen James Engel, 
Moderator James Grimes and Town Clerk Frances Richards. At 7:30 p.m., Town 
Manager George Howe moved that the Special Town Meeting be adjourned and 
reconvened at the Performing Arts Center at 7:45 p.m. It was seconded and so 
voted. Moderator Grimes opened the meeting at 7:48 p.m. The tellers were: David 
Standley, Joe Rogers and Don Francis. Deborah Eliason from Kopelman and Paige 
was Town Counsel. 

Bill Wasserman moved to reconsider Article 10 by splitting the motion. Seconded. 

69 



The Moderator announced the procedure for reconsideration and if successful, the 
article would be reconsidered at the end of the meeting. 

The voice vote on the motion to reconsider Article 10 was inconclusive. On a hand 
count with 98 voting in favor and 83 voting against, the motion carried. 

ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by: 

(1) amending SECTION III. DEFINITIONS as follows: 

a. adding, in the proper alphabetical sequence, the following definitions: 

"BODY ART: The practice of physical body adornment by permitted 
establishments and practitioners using, but not limited to, the following 
techniques: body piercing, tattooing, cosmetic tattooing, branding, and 
scarification. 

BODY ART ESTABLISHMENT: A location, place, or business that has been 
granted a permit by the Board of Health, where the practices of body art are 
performed, whether or not for profit. 

PERSONAL CONSUMER AND SERVICE ESTABLISHMENT: An establishment 
not described elsewhere in the Table of Use Regulations of this bylaw, which 
has ordinary characteristics of retail establishments except that services 
instead of goods are sold. Its principal activity is to furnish service to the 
consuming public"; and 

b. revising the definition of PRIVATE GUEST HOUSE by adding, after the 
words "An accessory residential building which does not have kitchen or 
cooking facilities", and before the words "and which is clearly accessory to the 
principal dwelling unit.", the following "is not let for compensation,"; and 

(2) amending SECTION V. USE SCHEDULE . Table of Use Regulations , as follows: 

Within said Table under the heading COMMERCIAL, add the use "Body Art 
Establishment"" and insert a "SPB" under the HB column, and a "-" under the 
remaining columns; and 

Within said Table under the heading ACCESSORY, add the use "Manager's 
unit in hotels, motels, inns, bed & breakfast establishments, assisted living or 
life care facility, campground, and mini-storage warehouses", and inserting a 
"SPB" under all columns within which each principal use is allowed; and a "-" 
under the remaining columns; and 

70 



(3) amending VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS as follows: 

Amend B . Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations by adding, for the 
Residence Districts, under the Side and Rear Minimum Setback columns, the 
footnote "27.", said footnote to read as follows: 

"27. No more than one storage shed, having a maximum floor area of 150 
square feet may be located not less than five (5) feet from side and rear lot 
lines.;" and 

Revise "E. Screening Requirements " by deleting the second sentence in its 
entirety and replacing with the following: "Screening shall consist of fencing 
and /or densely planted vegetation along the entirety of each side and rear lot 
line. Vegetative screening shall be at least ten (10) feet in width, except where 
a use abuts a Rural, Neartown or Intown Residence district boundary, in 
which case it shall be twenty (20) feet along the district boundary."; and 

Revise "F. Requirements for Accessory Buildings and Structures : , second 
sentence, by deleting the words "less than ten (10) feet from the principal 
building" and substituting in lieu thereof "five (5) feet from the principal 
building"; and 

Modify G. Other General Dimensional and Density Requirements by deleting 
the language in paragraph "4." and substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"4. Lots lying in an IR, NR, or RRA/RRB District shall not be narrower 
than fifty (50) feet, seventy-five (75) feet, or one hundred twenty-five 
(125) feet, respectively, between side lot lines at any point between the 
frontage street and the front side of the principal building."; and 

(4) amending SECTION VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS , 

K. Design Standards for Parking Facilities , first sentence, by adding, after the 
words 'The minimum dimensions of parking spaces and maneuvering aisles, 
and before the words, "shall be as follows", the words "for all uses except 
detached single-family and two-family dwelling units on their own separate 
lots,"; and 

(5) amending SECTION VIII. SIGNS, C. Definitions by revising the definition of 

Temporary Sign , "l.b. Construction Sign", fourth bullet, by deleting the words 
"ten (10) square feet" and substituting in lieu thereof "twenty (20) square feet"; 
and 

(6) amending SECTION IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS . C . Water Supply Protection 

Districts, 1 . Uses in the District, Table of Uses, by modifying the uses 
"Installation or replacement of on-site septic system(s) with a design capacity 

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of up to and including 600 gallons per day per acre" and "Installation or 
replacement of on-site septic system(s) with a design capacity greater than 
600 gallons per day per acre" by deleting, from each description, the words 
"Installation or replacement" and substituting in lieu thereof "New 
construction or expansion"; and by adding the use "Replacement or repair of 
an on-site septic system that will not increase its design capacity", and by 
placing a "P" under the District A and District B columns for this use; and 

(7) amending SECTION IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS , J. Accessory In-Law 

Apartment "2. Applicability b." by deleting the phrase ", and shall not involve 
the expansion of the footprint of the existing structure."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Associate Planning Board member David Santomenna moved that the Town vote to 
amend "THE PROTECTIVE ZONING BYLAW OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" as 
presented in Article 17 of the Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town 
Meeting. Seconded. 

The Planning Board, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen unanimously 
voted in favor. 

It was moved to amend this article by deleting all references from this article to the 
Neartown Residential District. Seconded. 

Motion carried by unanimous vote voice on the amendment. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote on the main motion as amended. 

ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich, 
CHAPTER XI. GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, Section 2 . Conveyances of 
Land. Subsection (b) . as follows: 

After the words "slope maintenance purposes,", add the words "building or signage 
overhang purposes,"; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Joshua Massey moved that the Town vote to amend 'THE 
GENERAL BYLAWS OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" as presented in Article 18 of the 
Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

The Planning Board, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen voted 
unanimously in favor. 

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Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 
ARTICLE 19 



To see if the Town will vote to amend the "General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich", 
CHAPTER XII. USE OF STREETS, SIDEWALKS, AND PUBLIC PLACES," by deleting 
" Section 10. Scenic Roads " in its entirety and replacing it with the following: 

i "Section 10. Scenic Roads 

AUTHORITY AND PURPOSE 

; (1.1) Authority 

This bylaw is adopted under authority of Chapter 40, Section 15C and Chapter 40, 
Section 2 1 of the Massachusetts General Laws and Article II and Article LXXXIX, 
Section 6 Articles of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

(1.2) Purpose 

The purpose of this bylaw is to maintain the rural, natural, historic and scenic 
character of the Town's roadways. The bylaw, under authority of the Scenic Road 
Act of 1973 (Chapter 40, Section 15C) ensures that 1) town ways will be 
recommended for designation as scenic roads in accordance with the criteria stated 
in this bylaw; and 2) trees and stone walls within the rights-of-way or layout of all 
designated scenic town roads will not be altered without the required public 
hearing, nor without following the other procedures set forth in this bylaw. 

DEFINITIONS: 

In the absence of contrary meaning established through legislative or judicial action 
pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 15C, the following terms contained in that 
statute shall be defined as follows: 

(2.1) Cutting or Removal of Trees 

Shall mean the removal of one or more trees, trimming of major branches, or cutting 
of roots sufficient in the Tree Warden's written opinion to cause eventual 
destruction of a tree. 

(2.2) Repair, Maintenance, Reconstruction or Paving Work 

Shall mean any work done within the right-of-way by any person or agency, public 
or private. Within this definition is any work on any portion of the right-of-way 
which was not physically commenced at the time the road was designated as a 
scenic road. Construction of new driveways or alteration of existing ones is 

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included, insofar as it takes place within the right-of-way. Construction or alteration 
of water, sewer, electric, telephone, cable TV, or other utilities within the 
right-of-way is also included. 

(2.3) Roads 

Shall mean a right-of-way of any way used and maintained as a public way, 
including the vehicular traveled way plus necessary appurtenances within the 
right-of-way, such as bridge structures, drainage systems, retaining walls, traffic 
control devices, and sidewalks, but not intersecting streets or driveways. When the 
boundary of the right-of-way is an issue so that a dispute arises as to whether or 
not certain trees or stonewalls or portions thereof are within or without the way, the 
trees and stonewalls shall be presumed to be within the way until the contrary is 
shown. 

(2.4) Tearing Down or Destruction of Stone Walls 

Shall mean the destruction of more than ten (10) linear feet of stone wall involving 
more than one cubic foot of wall material per linear foot above existing grade. 
Temporary removal and replacement at the same location with the same materials is 
permitted without Planning Board approval if the Town Highway Department is 
notified before the work begins so that it can confirm that the wall is properly 
replaced. Repair of a stone wall that does not involving tearing down or destroying 
the wall is not covered by this bylaw. 

(2.5) Trees 

Shall include any living tree whose trunk has a diameter of four inches or more as 
measured four feet above the ground. Nothing in this definition shall be construed 
to permit a person, other than the Tree Warden or his deputy, to trim, cut down, or 
remove a public shade tree more than one and one-half inches in diameter one foot 
from the ground. 



CRITERIA FOR DESIGNATION AS A SCENIC ROAD: 

(3. 1) In determining which roads or portions of roads should be recommended to 
Town Meeting for designation as scenic roads, the following criteria should be 
considered: 

a. Overall scenic beauty; 

b. Contribution of trees to scenic beauty; 

c. Contribution of stone walls to scenic beauty; 

d. Age and historic significance of roads, trees, and stone walls; 

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e. Built features such as historic buildings, historic monuments, historic 
burial grounds, historic structures, farm buildings and fencing; and 

f. Road features such as historic layout, surface, carriage width, use 

restrictions, and non-historic bridges. 

PROCEDURE FOR DESIGNATING SCENIC ROADS: 

(4.1) The Planning Board, the Board of Selectmen, the Conservation Commission, 
the Historical Commission, or a petition often (10) citizens of the Town may propose 
"scenic road" designation of any Ipswich road other than a state highway. The 
Planning Board shall then hold a Public Hearing notifying the Selectmen, the Tree 
Warden, the Highway Department, the Conservation Commission, and the Historical 
Commission and the public by advertising in a newspaper of general circulation in 
the area, the last publication to occur at least seven (7) days prior to the date of the 
hearing. The Planning Board shall make a recommendation to Town Meeting on the 
merits of designation of the proposed road as a scenic way. No road shall be 
designated a scenic road by Town Meeting unless such designation is favorably 
recommended by the Planning Board, Conservation Commission or Historical 
Commission. A majority vote of Town Meeting is required for designation. 

(4.2 ) Following designation by Town Meeting, the Planning Board shall: 

(a.) Notify all municipal departments that may take action with respect to such 
roads; 

(b.) Notify the Massachusetts Highway Department; 

(c.) Indicate such designation on all maps currently in use by municipal 
departments, and 

(d.) Notify all utility companies or other such parties, which may be working on 
the border of such road. 

(4.3) The twenty- three roads already designated as scenic roads by the Scenic Roads 
Act of 1973 (Chapter 40, Section 15C) shall retain their status as scenic for the 
purpose of this Scenic Road bylaw. These roads are (including year of designation): 

Argilla Road (1974) Linebrook Road from Leslie Road to 

Boxford Road (1974) Topsfleld Line (1976) 

Candlewood Road (1974) Meetinghouse Green (1974) 

Chebacco Road (1974) Mill Road (1988) 

East Street, #2 (1989) Newbury Road (1974) 

Fellows Road (1974) Old England Road (1974) 

Goodhue Road (1974) Old Right Road from Rt. 1 to Topsfield 

75 



Gravelly Brook Road (1989) Line (1989) 

Heartbreak Road (1974) Pineswamp Road (1974) 

Labor in Vain Road ( 1 974) Rocky Hill Road ( 1 974) 

Lakemans Lane (1991) Sagamore Road ( 1 974) 

Linebrook Road from School Topsneld Road from Kennedy Dr. to 

to Howe Street (1988) Topsfield Line (1988) 

Waldingfield Road (1974) 

PROCEDURES: 

(5.1) Filing 

Any person, organization or agency seeking the consent of the Planning Board 
under M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 15C regarding road repair, maintenance, 
reconstruction, or paving work that may involve the cutting or removal or trees or 
the tearing down of stone walls, or portions thereof, shall file a request with the 
Planning Board and submit the following information: 

(a) Filling out an application identifying the location of the proposed action so 
that readers may locate it with reasonable specificity on the ground 
without the need for additional plats or references, and describing in 
reasonable 

detail the proposed changes to trees and stone walls, and a statement of 
purpose, or purposes, for the proposed action. 

(b) Submit one copy with necessary background information to the Planning 
Board and one application form to the Town Clerk. This application is then 
time-stamped by the office of the Town Clerk. 

(5.2) Notice 

The Planning Board shall, as required by statute, give notice of its public hearing to 
discuss the alterations that the applicant wants to have done. Notice will be posted 
twice in a newspaper of general circulation in the area, with the last publication 
occurring at least seven (7) days prior to the hearing. The notice will contain the 
time, date, place and purpose of the of the hearing. It will also state the purpose of 
the public hearing. 

(5.3) Timing of the Hearing 

The Planning Board shall hold a public hearing within 30 days of receipt of a 
properly filed request. 

(5.4) Decision 

The Planning Board gives written consent to the applicant with copy filed with the 

76 



Town Clerk. If a consolidated meeting has been held involving the Tree Warden, 
then the Tree Warden issues the written permit. His jurisdiction involves public 
shade trees. 

CONSIDERATIONS: 

(6.1) In acting on applications concerning scenic roads, the Planning Board shall 
take into consideration the following: preservation of natural resources and historic 
resources; scenic and aesthetic characteristics; environmental values; public safety; 
local residential traffic patterns and overall traffic volume and congestion, 
compensatory actions proposed, such as tree and wall replacement, functional 
importance and urgency of repair; maintenance, reconstruction, or paving; 
additional evidence contributed by abutters, Town agencies, and other interested 
parties; existence or absence of reasonable alternatives; and other planning 
information. 

DRIVEWAY DESIGN GUIDELINES: 

(7. 1) At a minimum, driveways should be consistent with Ipswich regulations for 
residential driveways and curb cuts, and should comply with this bylaw. 

(7.2) Only one driveway cut per lot onto any scenic road should be allowed. A new 
driveway on a scenic road should not exceed twelve feet in width, unless it is a 
common driveway, in which case it should not exceed sixteen feet in width. 

(7.3) Stonewall sections to be removed for a driveway should not exceed the 
driveway width by more than one foot. 

(7.4) No tree with a trunk exceeding four inches in diameter measured four feet 
above the ground should be removed for a driveway unless the curb cut cannot be 
safely located elsewhere. 

(7.5) Driveways should be located in a manner that minimizes the required cut and 
fill, so as to preserve the existing topography to the greatest extent possible. 

ENFORCEMENT: 

(8.1) Failure to file with the Planning Board for permission to cut or remove trees or 
for destruction of any portion of a stone wall within the layout of any scenic road 
will require an immediate filing as detailed above and the applicant shall be required 
to restore the features if required by the Planning Board. 

(8.2) Any violation of this bylaw, M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 15C, or a Planning 
Board decision issued under this bylaw or M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 15C, shall be 
punishable by a fine not to exceed three hundred dollars per violation; any such 
violation may also be enforced through non-criminal disposition in accordance with 

77 



this bylaw and general bylaws Chapter 17, Section 4c."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Associate Member of the Planning Board David Santomenna moved that the Town 
vote to amend 'THE GENERAL BYLAWS OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" as presented 
in Article 19 of the Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town Meeting, with 
the following changes: 

(a) in Section 4. 1, line 6, insert the word "twice" after the word "advertising"; 
and 

(b) delete Section "(5.2) Notice" in its entirety and substitute in lieu thereof the 
following new Section: 

"(5.2) Notice 

The Planning Board shall then hold a public hearing, notifying the Selectmen, the 
Tree Warden, the Highway Division, the Conservation Commission, the Historical 
Commission, and the public by advertising twice in a newspaper of general 
circulation in the area, the last publication to occur at least seven (7) days prior to 
the date of the hearing. The purpose of said hearing shall be to gather facts and 
evidence with respect to the alterations proposed by the applicant." 
Seconded. 

The Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee voted 
unanimously in favor. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote: 

(a) to accept Chestnut Street as a Town street as shown on a plan entitled 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan of Chestnut Street, Owners of Record: Mary T. 
Kallman, Estate, and Randall Associates, Inc., dated February 27, 1997, and revised 
June 24, 1997," prepared by Meridian Engineering, Inc., Richard E. Waitt, Jr., 
Registered Professional Engineer, and Donald E. Bowen, Jr., Professional Land 
Surveyor, and recorded at the Essex South District Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 
317, Plan 09, a copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Clerk; and 

(b) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift an easement to use said 
street (Chestnut Street) for all purposes for which public ways are used in the Town; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

7ft 



Planning Board Chairman Leslie Brooks moved that the Town vote: 

(a) to accept Chestnut Street as town street as shown a plan entitled "Definitive 
Subdivision Plan of Chestnut Street, Owners of Record: Mary T. Kallman, Estate, 
and Randall Associates, Inc., dated February 27, 1997, and revised June 24, 1997", 
prepared by Meridian Engineering, Inc., Richard E. Waitt, Jr., Registered 
Professional Engineer, and Donald E. Bowen, Jr., Professional Land Surveyor, and 
recorded at the Essex South District Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 317, Plan 09, a 
copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Clerk; and 

(b) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift an easement to use said 
street (Chestnut Street) for all purposes for which public ways are used in the Town; 
Seconded. 

The Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee voted 
unanimously in favor. 

Motion carried by simple majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to ratify and confirm the proposed acquisition of one 
or more parcels of land, each at an intended purchase price in excess of 
$1,500,000, in accordance with the conditions of the bonds authorized to be issued 
under Article 18 of the Warrant for the April 03, 2000, Annual Town Meeting; and 
(2) to add parcels to, or delete parcels from, the list (referenced in Article 18 of the 
Warrant for the April 03, 2000, Annual Town Meeting and subsequently amended 
under Article 22 of the April 02, 2001, Annual Town Meeting) on file in the office of 
the Planning Board and in the office of the Town Clerk, said changes to be placed on 
file in the office of the Planning Board and in the office of the Town Clerk by 
September 2 1 , 200 1 ; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Open 
Space Committee) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote: (1) to amend its action taken 
under Article 22 of the April 2, 2001, Annual Town Meeting (further amended under 
Article 10 of the October 16, 2000, Special Town Meeting) by adding after the words 
"or lesser interest therein" the words "or to expend an amount exceeding one million 
five hundred thousand dollars ($1,500,000.00) but not exceeding two million five 
hundred thousand dollars ($2,500,000.00) for the fee-simple acquisition of this 
property."; so that said action, as amended, shall read as follows: 

"...moved to authorize the Board of Selectmen, pursuant to Part C of the Open 
Space Bond Authorization approved as Article 18 of the Warrant for the April 2000, 
Annual Town Meeting, to expend Open Space Bond Funds pursuant to said 
Authorization for the acquisition, for general municipal purposes, of the fee interest 
or a less than fee interest in the parcel of land known as the Wendel property at 52 

79 



Jeffreys Neck Road, Assessors Map 22D, Lot 48, in an amount exceeding one million 
five hundred thousand dollars ($1,500,000.00) but not exceeding two million dollars 
($2,000,000.00), or to expend an amount exceeding one million five hundred 
thousand dollars ($1,500,000.00) but not exceeding two million five hundred 
thousand dollars ($2,500,000.00) for the fee-simple acquisition of said property; 
provided that the Selectmen may accept on behalf of the Town any grants or gifts of 
money to be added to Town funds for the acquisition of this property or lesser 
interest therein, and may enter into cooperative agreements with other parties to 
provide additional funds for or otherwise defray a portion of the total cost of this 
acquisition."; and 

(2) to add the following parcels to the list (as referenced in Article 18 of the April 3, 
2000 Annual Town Meeting) on file in the office of the Planning Board and in the 
Office of the Town Clerk, said changes having been placed on file in the office of the 
Planning Board and in the office of the Town Clerk by September 21, 2001: 

a) Land now/formerly of Bobby D. and Nancy J. Godbee, Assessors' Map 12, 
Parcel 2, consisting of approximately 6.7 acres off of High Street; and 

b) Land now/formerly of Philip W. and Mary Ross, Assessors Map 21, 
Parcel 104, consisting of approximately 29.5 acres off of Maria Drive 

Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Planning Board and Open Space Committee unanimously 
recommended. The Finance Committee voted 8 in favor and 1 against the motion. 

Mr. Engel moved to amend the motion by adding after the words "for a fee-simple 
acquisition of said property" the words "or a portion thereof. Seconded. 

John Moss moved to amend the motion by adding after the word "property" the 
words "not less than 90 acres". Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Open Space Committee and Planning 
Board unanimously opposed Mr. Moss' amendment. 

Mr. Engel, Jamie Fay and David Standley spoke against Mr. Moss' amendment. 

The question was moved, seconded and so voted. 

The voice vote for Mr. Moss' amendment failed to carry. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Open Space Committee and Planning 
Board unanimously voted in favor of Mr. Engel's amendment. 

The voice vote for Mr. Engel's amendment carried unanimously. 

80 



Mr. Moss moved to amend the amended main motion by adding after the words "or 
a portion thereof the words "together with an additional two hundred thousand 
dollars ($200,000) to cover the Historical Preservation of the buildings." 

After checking with Town Counsel, the Moderator ruled Mr. Moss' amendment out 
of order. 

The question was moved, seconded and so voted. 

The vote on the main motion as amended carried on a simple majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 22 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
Massachusetts General Court to authorize and direct the Massachusetts Division of 
Capital Asset Management (DCAM), in accordance with G.L. C.82 §2, to discontinue 
the Ipswich portion of Gravelly Brook Road. 

And further, notwithstanding the provisions of G.L. C.7, §40F 16, G.L. C 30B, §16 
and any other general or special law to the contrary to authorize and direct DCAM 
to convey and grant all right, title and interest acquired by Essex County in the 
discontinued Ipswich portion of Gravelly Brook Road to the abutters; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Armand Michaud, DPW Director) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote: 

a) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the Massachusetts General Court 
to authorize and direct the Massachusetts Division of Capital Asset Management 
(DCAM), in accordance with G.L. C. 82 Sec. 2, to discontinue the Ipswich portion of 
Gravelly Brook Road described in Layout Plan Number 1052, voted on December 19, 
1854, by the Essex County Commissioners; and 

b) notwithstanding the provisions of G.L. C.7, Sec. 40FV2, G.L. C. 30B, Sec. 16, and 
any other general or special law to the contrary, to authorize and direct DCAM to 
convey and grant all right, title and interest acquired by Essex County in the 
discontinued Ipswich portion of Gravelly Brook Road to the abutters. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 23 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the GENERAL BYLAWS OF THE TOWN OF 
IPSWICH, CHAPTER XVII "NONCRIMINAL DISPOSITION OF CERTAIN 
VIOLATIONS," Section 4. Applicable Bylaws. Rules, or Regulations: Subsection C. 
Rules and Regulations" by adding to the Table contained in the last sentence 
thereof, the following: 

81 



"Regulations on Use of Town Hall and its Grounds (Town Manager) $50.00"; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Town Manager) 

Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. Seconded. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 24 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to file special 
legislation, similar in nature to Chapter 87, Acts of 1991, which would: a) authorize 
the Town, subject to appropriation, to expend funds to renovate the former Town 
Hall as a court facility and then to lease the facility to The Trial Court of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts; and/or b) authorize The Trial Court of the 
Commonwealth to enter into a lease with the Town of Ipswich for a duration greater 
than ten (10) years; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of 
Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to petition the General Court to authorize the Town, subject to 
appropriation, to expend funds to renovate the former Town Hall as a court facility 
and then to lease the facility to The Trial Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, similar in nature to Chapter 87, Acts of 1991. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 25 

To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen, in conjunction with The 
Trustees of Reservations (TTOR), petition the Massachusetts General Court to 
enable TTOR to secure appointments of their law enforcement officers as state police 
officers, with arrest powers, within TTORs premises located within the Town of 
Ipswich; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Town Manager) 

Selectman James Foley moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended indefinite 
postponement. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



R2 



ARTICLE 26 

To see if the Town will vote to discontinue a portion of Clark Road, generally 
described as a trapezoidal parcel of surplus land consisting of sixty (60) square feet, 
more or less, within the layout of Clark Road in the vicinity of land of Stanley W. 
Wood; and further to transfer the care, custody, maintenance and control of the 
property described herein to the Board of Selectmen, and authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell and convey said parcel to Stanley W. Wood, 74 Clark Road, for a 
minimium purchase price to be established by vote of town meeting (Assessors Map 
24A, Lot 98); or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of 
Selectmen) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell and convey, for the minimum purchase price of $675.00, a 
trapezoidal parcel of land consisting of eighty-two (82) square feet, more or less, 
within the layout of Clark Road in the vicinity of land of Stanley W. Wood, 74 Clark 
Road (Assessors Map 24A, Lot 98), identified as Parcel 1 on Plan of Land in Ipswich, 
MA, scale 1" = 20', prepared for Stanley W. Wood, Jr., Trustee: Bayview Trust, dated 
September 18, 2001, by Rural Land Surveyors, 130 Centre Street, Danvers, MA, 
Frederick M. Forbes, Registered Land Surveyor, a copy of which plan, together with 
a metes and bounds description, is on file in the office of the Town Clerk and in the 
office of the Planning Board. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 

Nancy Marlowe, 79 Clark Road, asked the Selectmen not to convey the land because 
she didn't know what the plan was and what impact it would have on the neighbors. 

The voice vote on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count with 98 voting in 
favor and 60 voting against, the motion failed the required 2/3's majority vote. 

ARTICLE 27 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 6 of the April 02, 
200 1 , Annual Town Meeting (Building Department Revolving Fund) by changing the 
purpose for which funds may be expended from: "....to finance additional part-time 
help in the Building Department and to pay related expenditures;" to: " (a) to pay 
for additional part-time help in the Building Department and expenditures related to 
said additional part-time help, and (b) to pay for additional Building Department 
office expenses and/or additional Building Department capital outlay expenses;" or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Town Manager) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. Seconded. 

83 



Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 28 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the filing of Special Legislation to waive the 
maximum age eligibility requirement for Robert Bowen, Christopher Gregory, 
Dennis Howes, Keith LeBlanc, Ronald Martineau, David Smith and Jeff Stone, the 
provisions of Civil Service notwithstanding; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (By petition of Jeffrey C. French, Willard Maker, and others ) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote to authorize the filing of Special 
Legislation to waive the maximum age eligibility requirement for Robert Bowen, 
Christopher Gregory, Dennis Howes, Keith LeBlanc, Ronald Martineau, David Smitl 
and Jeff Stone, the provisions of Civil Service notwithstanding. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 

Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 29 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the filing of Special Legislation to waive the 
maximum age eligibility requirement for D. Clapp and K. Lombard, the provisions of 
Civil Service notwithstanding; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By 
petition of Jeffrey C. French, Willard Maker, and others ) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote to authorize the filing of Special 
Legislation to waive the maximum age eligibility requirement for D. Clapp and K. 
Lombard the provisions of Civil Service notwithstanding. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 30 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the gift of a parcel of land in the area of Metcalf 
Creek and Broad Creek (Assessor's Map 7, Lot 2), now or formerly of Albert 
Chapman, subject to waiver of back taxes otherwise owed to the Town; and to 
determine that said parcel shall be subject to the care, custody and control by the 
Conservation Commission; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that the Town vote to accept the gift of a 
parcel of land in the area of Metcalf Creek and Broad Creek (Assessors Map 7, Lot 

84 



2), now or formerly of Albert Chapman; and to determine that, upon its conveyance 
to the Town, said parcel shall be subject to the care, custody and control by the 
Conservation Commission. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 31 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
Massachusetts General Court (the text of which may be subject to amendment 
during the legislative process) which otherwise provides: 

"Section One. Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, Robert L. 
Irvine shall be permitted to purchase years of creditable service for the purposes of 
retirement, based on military service, and pursuant to paragraph (h) of subdivision 
(1) of Section 4 of Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, as if 
such action had been taken prior to April 01, 1997. 

Section Two. This act shall take effect upon its passage."; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (Sponsor: Town Manager) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to 
petition the General Court to adopt the following legislation, 

"Section One. Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 3 of Chapter 71 of the Acts 
of 1 996 or any other general or special law, Robert L. Irvine may make application 
to the Essex Regional Retirement Board for creditable service pursuant to paragraph 
(h) of subdivision (1) of Section 4 of Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
within one hundred eighty days of the effective date of this Act. 
Section Two. This act shall take effect upon its passage." Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee voted unanimously in favor. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

The Moderator introduced Representative Brad Hill who greeted the voters and 
announced the new re -districting in his district. 

ARTICLE 32 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 20, Section 2(d) 
of the October 21, 1996, Annual Town Meeting by providing structural pollution 
prevention through the use and maintenance of covered waste and recycling 
containers at the Town Wharf, being under the control and managed by the 
authorities of the Town of Ipswich. (By petition of Scott and Heather Pett, and 

85 



others) 

Heather Pett moved that the Town vote to amend the GENERAL BYLAWS OF THE 
TOWN OF IPSWICH, CHAPTER XIII "USE OF TOWN PROPERTY", "Section 2. Town 
Wharf', subsection (d), by: 

deleting the words: "No person shall dispose of refuse at the Town Wharf." ; and by 
substituting in lieu thereof the following words: 'The Town shall provide and 
maintain covered waste and recycling containers at the Town Wharf. No person 
shall dispose of refuse at the Town Wharf except in the Town's covered waste and 
recycling containers." Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously voted not to recommend 
the motion. 

Several voters and neighbors in the area spoke for and against the motion. The 
motion failed on a simple majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 33 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
Massachusetts General Court to exempt the Cable Emergency Room from 
regulations enacted by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health ( 1 05 CMR 
130.820) with respect to requirements for the operation of Satellite Emergency 
Facilities, e.g.,: 

"Section One. Any general or special law or regulation to the contrary 
notwithstanding, the provisions of Massachusetts Department of Public Health with 
respect to the requirements for the operation of Satellite Emergency Facilities shall 
not apply to any Satellite Emergency Facility which has been in continuous 
operation in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since July 01, 1987. 

Section Two. This act shall take effect upon its passage."; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mark Coltin moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
petition the General Court to exempt the Cable Emergency Room from regulations 
enacted by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (105 CMR 130.820) with 
respect to requirements for the operation of Satellite Emergency Facilities, e.g.,: 

"Section One. Any general or special law or regulation to the contrary 
notwithstanding, the provisions of Massachusetts Department of Public Health with 
respect to the requirements for the operation of Satellite Emergency Facilities shall 
not apply to any Satellite Emergency Facility which has been in continuous 
operation in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since July 01, 1987. 
Section Two. This act shall take effect upon its passage." Seconded. 

86 



Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 

Mark Coltin, Brad Hill and James Foley spoke in favor and urged voters to support 
the motion. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

RECONSIDERATION ON ARTICLE 10 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by: 

1) Amending SECTION V. USE SCHEDULE , Table of Use Regulations , by 

Deleting, under the IR column, for the uses "Single-family detached dwelling" and 
'Two-family dwelling", the footnote "18", and substituting in lieu thereof footnote 
"22.", said footnote to read as follows: 

"22. By special permit, the Planning Board may allow two principal buildings 
on a lot, provided that the lot contains: (a) only one existing single-family or 
two-family dwelling at the time of application; and (b) the proposed additional 
single-family detached dwelling is located entirely within the envelope of an 
accessory building in existence on the effective date of this amendment, 
except for dormers or other appurtenances related to the conversion of a non- 
residential building to a dwelling unit."; and 

2) Revising VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS by amending 
B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations as follows: 

Within the "Intown Residence" row, for the use "Single-family detached", add a 
footnote "26." to the value "10,000", said footnote to read as follows: 

"26. For undeveloped lots, held separately or combined with an adjoining lot, 
which conform to the original subdivision layout, have at least 5,000 square 
feet of area and at least fifty feet of street frontage, and upon which no house 
has been built, the rninimuni square footage requirement for a detached 
single-family dwelling may be reduced by 50% by special permit from the 
Planning Board, provided that the proposed dwelling does not exceed 1,800 
square feet of floor area and satisfies all of the dimensional requirements of 
the Intown Residence (IR) District."; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Moderator James Grimes moved that the Town reconsider its vote on Article 10 to 

87 



amend 'THE PROTECTIVE ZONING BYLAW OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" as 
presented in Article 10 of the Warrant for the October 15, 2001, Special Town 
Meeting, with the following changes: 

under 1), delete the words " Amending SECTION V. USE SCHEDULE, Table of Use 
Regulations, by Deleting, under the IR column, for the uses 'Single-family detached 
dwelling' and Two-family dwelling', the footnote '18', and substituting in lieu thereoJ 
footnote '22', said footnote to read as follows:", and replace it with the following: 

"Amending SECTION V. USE SCHEDULE as follows: amend the Table of Use 
Regulations by adding, under the IR column, for the uses 'Single-family 
detached dwelling' and Two-family dwelling', the footnote '23', said footnote to 
read as follows:"; and 

amend the language of footnote 23. by adding, after "(b)", the following 
sentences, to read as follows: "In considering the special permit application, 
the Planning Board will not find that the proposal satisfies the special permit 
criterion 'Social, economic, or community needs served by the proposal' 
(SECTION XI.J .2.a.L unless the applicant provides a mechanism to achieve 
long-term affordability. To the extent feasible, the Planning Board may 
provide, or cause the Town to provide, a financial subsidy to assist the 
applicant in satisfying this objective."; and 

add, after the above language, the following: 

under the FOOTNOTES TO USE REGULATIONS, by amending footnote 18 as 
follows: "adding, after "Not more than one principal building per lot," the 
words: ", except as provided in footnote 23."; and 

under 2), amend the language of footnote 26. by changing the number of the 
footnote from "26." to "25.", and by deleting from the language of the footnote the 
words "by 50%". Seconded. 

Bill Wasserman moved to amend Article 10 by deleting the section under 2 in its 
entirety. Seconded. 

The Planning Board, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended in favor of the amendment. 

Motion carried by voice vote on the amendment. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote on the main motion as amended. 

ARTICLE 34 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all previous articles raising and/or 

88 



appropriating money contained in this warrant for the purpose of completing a 
budget which is balanced and in compliance with the levy limit provisions of 
Proposition 2V2, so called; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

Motion to adjourn the meeting was seconded and carried by unanimous voice vote. 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:50 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested copies thereof at 
the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, and by publication at 
least fourteen (14) days prior to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper 
published in, or having a general circulation in, the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this twenty-fourth day of September in the year of our Lord, 
Two Thousand and One. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James R. Engel 
James W. Foley 
Patrick J. McNally 
Eugene A. Hailson 
Harry Lampropoulos 



89 



******** 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James R. Engel, Chair 

Following municipal elections in April, Harry Lampropoulos 
joined the Board replacing Edward B. Rauscher. The Board 
reorganized choosing James R. Engel as Chair and James W.- 
Foley as Vice-Chair. 

Under the direction of Selectman Patrick McNally, good 
progress has been made by the Board regarding the re-use 
and disposition of municipally owned buildings. 

The conversion of the Whipple School building into a 
municipal center was completed. Occupancy took place in 
the May- June timeframe. The conversion and re-use has 
resulted in the co-location of the majority of municipal 
offices with resulting synergy and improvement in 
communications among staff. Public comments on the new 
facility have been most favorable. The facility is much 
more accommodating to the public and provides comfortable 
and much needed public meeting spaces for the conduct of 
Town affairs. The project was completed within budget and 
on time. The Selectmen are grateful to the citizens and 
staff who served on the oversight committee during the 
execution of this project. 

111 

:JJ. 




Town Manager George Howe and 
Selectman Pat McNally unveil the 
plaque during Open House 

Good progress has been made on the re-use of the Memorial 
Building. With Town Meeting approval, a purchase and sale 
agreement has been executed with Oak Hill for the 



90 



conversion of the building into 10 units of elderly 
housing. The building location, contiguous to the existing 
Oak Hill facility, will integrate smoothly into that 
project. Significant state aid is anticipated to complete 
this conversion. Since the Memorial Building purpose was 
to honor veterans who have served their country, the 
Selectmen carefully coordinated this re-use with the 
veterans so that memorabilia and memorial plaques would 
find an appropriate display location in the new Town Hall. 
The entryway of the new Town Hall already serves as a 
display area for relocated plaques. 

The conversion of the Town Hall to serve the needs of the 
Third District Court has been slowed somewhat by difficulty 
of reconciling Town desires to limit our financial exposure 
and the Court's ability to respond to these concerns within 
their present legislated authority. In the meantime, the 
Court continues to serve the community from that facility 
on a short-term lease basis. 

A fourth building, the so-called Annex on the Whipple 
School (new Town Hall) campus, is being considered for use 
as subsidized elderly housing. Proposals have been 
reviewed, and a period of exclusivity has been granted to a 
project team pursuing these objectives. 

Public safety issues dominated Town affairs in early 2001 
following a tragic fire. At the Annual Town Meeting the 
community endorsed a comprehensive review of public safety 
assets, staffing, and protocols across all departments - 
fire, police, and emergency medical services. Progress on 
the review has been generally in accordance with the 
original objectives and schedule and a series of public 
safety enhancement initiatives is anticipated at the 2002 
Annual Town Meeting. This effort has been under the 
direction of Selectman James Foley. 

A third area of major activity has been the continuation of 
the proposal to sewer the Neck. The April 2001 Town 
Meeting authorized the expenditure of up to $300, 000 to 
conduct an environmental impact report and associated work. 
The Selectmen established guidelines under which the 
program would go forward. In addition to their previously 
stated position that the project costs would be 100% 
bettered to the service area property owners, the Selectmen 
adopted additional growth management objectives which are 
anticipated to result in restrictions on re-development of 



91 



existing properties, restrictions on conversion of Little 
Neck properties to year round use, and limiting the 
development potential of the large tracts of undeveloped 
land controlled by the Proprietors of Great Neck. Final 
action on this project is anticipated in 2002. 

The future of the Cable Emergency Center is a fourth area 
of major concern and activity for the Board. Following 
adoption of state regulations regarding the certification 
of personnel employed at the Cable Emergency Center, 
Northeast Health Systems, the center operator, informed the 
Town of significant cost increases to the Town's subsidy as 
a result of these changes. The Town is involved in 
continuing discussions and interactions on a number of 
levels with the objective of retaining this vital service 
for the community at historic cost levels. 

As the Board began its budget deliberations for fiscal year 
2003, the challenges of maintaining services at levels 
requested by the community loomed large in light of 
anticipated decreases in revenues from all sources. 



1 




........ 

m 

: 

M 






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■111 

ill 



Sue Boice in the Video Control Booth. 
The Selectmen's Meeting can be viewed live on Cable 



92 



*•*■***■*•** 



TOWN MANAGER 

George E . Howe 

While Greater Bostonians have experienced their "Big Dig" 
for well nigh a decade, in 2001 Ipswich had its "Big Move. 
Town Hall, the Drop-In Center, and the Memorial Building 
all vacated their office space and moved into the glorious 
space in the former Whipple Middle School on Green Street. 
It is truly a community facility, used by folks of all 
ages, for which we can be proud. 




Town Manager George Howe leading a 
tour of the building during Open House 

As we departed quarters on Elm Street, the District Court 
remained behind; and they have begun to spread throughout 
the first floor of the building. An interim lease was 
negotiated, which covers our direct costs for maintenance 
of that building. Negotiations for renovations as a modern 
court facility have occurred throughout the year, and 
remain unresolved, although progress has been made. 

Two other structures have been part of the "moving chairs", 
and have received considerable attention by the Municipal 
Building Reuse Committee. Oak Hill and the Town neared 
completion of all the financing, securing grants to assist 
in development of the Memorial Building as seven elderly 
housing units. A developer was granted preferred status as 
a basis on which it would proceed to prepare plans to 



93 



create six to eight elderly housing units in the Annex 
Building behind the new Town Hall. 

Following a tragic fire in January, the Town funded a study 
on public safety facilities and staffing. Ballot questions 
will be presented at the April, 2002 elections to fund 
proposals arising from these studies. Measures were taken 
to enhance security for our water supplies in the aftermath 
of the 9/11/01 terrorist attack, and emergency procedures 
were developed and/or updated for building security and 
hazardous materials handling. The status of our long- 
standing contractual arrangement with Beverly Hospital for 
maintenance of the emergency room was placed in jeopardy by 
the adoption of new regulations for satellite facilities. 

Open space acquisitions also took up much energy and time 
this year. An in-holding in Willowdale State Forest was 
acquired, as well as the Scott Property. Agreements were 
reached to protect properties heretofore owned by Wendel, 
Barowy and Smolenski. The Hills Family land swap also was 
completed. 

Some large projects have been in planning stages this yea.. 
Turner Hill, NE Biolabs, and sewers (or alternatives 
thereto) for the Neck area. Public works projects included 
sidewalk and roadway reclamation in the Brownville Avenue 
and Pleasant Street area; and completion of the County 
Street sidewalk and seawall repair. As testament to many 
years' effort in environmental cleanup, we have received 
permission to re-open the Ipswich River to shellfish 
harvestation without the need for depuration. 

Staff completed an information technology master plan for 
the town, and is in the process of implementing a major 
component of that plan: installation of a new financial 
management system that operates in a Microsoft Windows 
operating environment. We have upgraded our town web site; 
please check it out. 

As the year closed, we began experiencing the impact of a 
declining economy. Revenue options, cutbacks, and 
expenditure referrals will be anticipated in 2002 - shades 
of the last downturn some eleven years ago. 

Lastly, one should mention several changes of management 
personnel which have occurred in the past year. After forty 
years with the Town, of which 27 were as DPW Director, 



94 



Armand Michaud retired. Bill Ford succeeded the late Louis 
Balboni as Power Plant Superintendent. Genevieve Picard was 
promoted to Assistant Director of the Library, following 
the retirement of Susan Wilkish. David Pancoast succeeded 
Kathryn Glenn as Conservation Agent, John Dunleavy replaced 
Janice Brown in the Utilities Business Office, and Richard 
Jones joined the staff as Director of Plant and Facilities, 
the latter position shared jointly by the schools and town. 

It's been a busy year. 

******** 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFTEY - Charles D. Surpitski, 
Director 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Charles D. Surpitski, Chief 
Peter A. Foote, Deputy Chief 

The tragic events that unfolded in New York City and 
Washington, D.C., on September 11 th reinforced the 
Department's commitment to remain vigilant and prepared to 
meet any threat to our community' s security; the importance 
of pro-active sharing of information among all law 
enforcement agencies; and the vital involvement of 
community members in observing and reporting acts that are 
suspicious in nature. As in all areas of crime and 
disorder, a partnership with the community is vital to 
preventing their occurrence. We have long supported this 
relationship and will do so in the future. 

A number of personnel changes occurred over the last twelve 
months. Long time Patrol Officer Richard Lombard retired 
in May, after a long career serving our citizens. In 
August, Patrol Officer Alice Moseley retired after fifteen 
years of service. Both deserve our appreciation for their 
contributions to the well-being of our community. These 
officers were replaced by newly appointed Patrol Officers 
Scott Frost and Shawn Smith. As reported last year, long 
time Patrolman Arthur Solomonides retired at the end of 
2000. He was replaced by Patrol Officer Jason Montiero. 

The Annual Town Meeting in April passed an article calling 
for review of the physical facilities of the Police 
Department and its staffing levels. I am pleased to report 
that this study began in September and will provide the 



95 



community with a blueprint for improvement in both these 
areas . 

Our community remained relatively safe over the past year, 
but issues of crime and disorder occur as the statistics 
below show. The Department continued an aggressive training 
program to meet existing and new crime challenges. Our 
close working relationship with other governmental 
agencies, the community, and the schools continued. 

Alarms 847 

Assaults 34 

Disturbances 223 

Breaking & Entering 27 

Domestic Disputes 99 

Larcenies 130 

Medical Aids 130 

Missing Persons 19 

M/V Accidents 276 

M/V Theft 7 

Suspicious Activity 296 

Threats 41 

Arrests 139 

Total Calls for Service .10,094 

As always, we are grateful to the citizens for their 
continued support. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Chief Henry Michalski, Jr. 

The department responded to 2,579 requests for service, 
which shows a 12 percent increase in responses over last 
year. The responses break down as follows: 



Incidents: 




Fire Prevention: 




Building fires 


12 


Fire alarm inspections 


308 


Vehicle fires 


8 


Oil burner inspections 


69 


Other fires 


64 


Plans review 


97 


Hazardous conditions 


188 


Building inspections 


291 


Rescue & Medical 


675 


Gas inspections 


16 


Mutual aid 


28 


Other fire prevention 


171 


Service calls 


350 






Good intent calls 


114 


Total 


952 


Unintentional alarms 


179 






False calls 


9 






Total 


1627 







96 



This has been a busy year with two feasibility studies on- 
going concerning both building staffing and equipment 
issues. Community members, public safety staff, selectmen, 
and finance committee as well as the professional groups 
have been conducting the studies and making 
recommendations. Everyone involved has put numerous hours 
in to give you the taxpayer an honest profile of your 
public safety division. I am sure that all the information 
you have and will receive will be considered, and the best 
possible solution for your safety will be granted. When 
making your decision on public safety concerns, it is 
important to remember that the fire service of today has 
emerged as the leading emergency organization. We are 
expected to react to all incidents, regardless of their 
size or nature. The need for adequate personnel resources 
and equipment to perform safe and effective operations is a 
must . 

The expectation of the modern fire department, like most 
government agencies, is to do more with less. Budgets, and 
subsequently the number of personnel, have not grown at a 
rate equal to local growth and demand for services. While 
no agency can staff at levels to handle all potential risks 
or demands, fire departments are measured by their ability 
to provide service in a timely manner. It is up to you the 
taxpayers of Ipswich to decide what level of emergency 
service you desire. The Ipswich Fire Department is 
comprised of a combination force utilizing both full time 
career fire fighters and part time call fire fighters. The 
staffing levels and diversity of the department requires 
personnel to be multi-talented and dynamic to meet the 
goals and objectives of the department. Our mission 
statement states, that the primary mission of the fire 
department is to protect the lives and property, through 
fire prevention, fire suppression, medical assistance, 
hazardous materials control, and terrorism mitigation to 
all who live, work or invest in the community. 

I would like to take this opportunity to welcome Keith 
Carlson on board as a new member of the career force. 
Keith had served as a member of the call force for 10 
years, and brings much experience to the firefighting 
force . 

The department has been busy with training. Members of 
the call force have been attending the Firefighter I/II 



97 



training twice a month. We have four more months and this 
phase will be completed. All members of the call force 
have received training in the use of the Semi Automatic 
Defibrillators. Several members of the career force have 
been active attending various training programs from the 
Fire Academy, as well as assisting in the in-house training 
program. 

As in the past, I would like to extend my sincere thanks to 
all the department members both career and call for their 
efforts to improve the department through training 
evolutions as well as responses to various situations. I 
would also like to thank the Board of Selectmen, Tow 
Manager, Director of Public Safety, and other departments 
throughout the Town for their help throughout the year. 

A special thanks needs to go out to the community for all 
your support in the past as well as your anticipated 
support for the future. Remember that the Fire Department 
is always there to serve you in whatever situation you may 
encounter . 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Harry Leno, Animal Control Officer 

The Animal Control Department has had a very unusual year 
working without a pound. I am pleased to report that with 
the help of a lot of volunteers we were able to provide 
continued, easy access, and user friendly service. 

During this year, the Town experienced an active rabies 
bite incident. In addition, the Department now is involved 
in dealing with the West Nile Virus. The Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health has issued guidelines for 
testing bird submissions. As a result of these threats to 
our well-being, the Department spent significant time 
dealing with incidents involving wild animals. 

The Animal Control Department continued to stress the 
education of all our citizens on the responsibility of 
quality pet care. This effort will improve the quality of 
community life in the long term. Proper adherence and 
enforcement of issues such as dog waste removal from public 
areas, vicious and barking dogs, and nuisance loose animals 
continued to demand time consuming efforts on the part of 



98 






this Department. Proper maintenance of felines and canines 
was the focus and goal of the Animal Control Department. 

Pound construction continued to move at a fast pace. The 
outside was completed, water and sewage lines were 
installed, and the interior was nearly completed. We 
expect the facility to be completed by early summer. 

Below are the recorded incidents the Department dealt with 
during 2001. 

Adopted 7 8 

Animals Killed by Cars 187 

Citations Issued 141 

Complaints Received 3441 

Complaints Investigated 3072 

Dog Bites 42 

Dogs & Cats Euthanized 3 

Dog Licenses Issued 1630 

Multi licenses Issued 48 

Dogs picked Up 128 

Animals Found 107 

Positive Rabies Tests 1 

Rabies Quarantine Orders Issued 146 



HARBORS DEPARTMENT 

Charles D. Surpitski, Harbormaster 

Sgt. John Poirier, Officer in Charge 

Ptl. Charles B. Schwartz, Assistant Harbormaster 

The year 2001 was a good year for the Harbor's Department. 
Although our waterways continued to remain congested, there 
were no major accidents. 

The pumpout boat, which began operation in calendar 2000, 
has been a positive service to the boating public and a 
huge success in removing boat effluent from our waterways. 
Pumpout boat operator Meredith Emery ran the boat in 2001 
and was a positive addition to our efforts to keep our 
waterways clean. The program is primarily funded through a 
grant from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, which allows 
the service to be offered at no charge to the Town. 



99 



The regular harbor boat patrols continued in earnest with 
an increased focus on waterway safety enforcement. We 
continued to see an increase in the number of boats which 
use our waterways, especially in the area of the back beach 
and the sand bars off Crane Beach. This heightened 
activity and resultant safety and potential disorder issues 
they bring, demands an increased harbor patrol effort both 
in personnel and in hours of operation. 

The jet ski patrols have proven to be an effective tool in 
ensuring responsible boat operation. Here again, because 
of our pristine waterways, characteristics of our 
coastline, and the fact that our boat launching ramp is 
easily accessible, we are seeing an increase in the number 
of jet skis using our waterways. Responsible operation at 
all times is a major goal of the Department and has 
effected the scheduling of our jet ski enforcement efforts. 

Personnel assigned to the marine unit continued to increase 
their knowledge and skills by attending training courses 
offered by the Massachusetts Harbormasters Association, the 
United States Coast Guard and the Massachusetts 
Environmental Police. We are grateful for these 
opportunities and their support. 

The Waterways Advisory Board continued to be an excellent 
means to bring boaters concerns to our attention, as well 
as suggested improvements to our waterways. They are 
beginning to tackle a number of issues that over the long 
term will have a positive impact on the use of this 
resource . 

We would like to thank the responsible boaters, skiers, and 
citizens who continued to operate their crafts in a safe 
and responsible manner and support our efforts to ensure 
safe waterways. 

Mooring permits issues 595 

Launching permits issued 217 

Gallons of boat effluent pumped 4,295 



100 



******** 



SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Phil Kent, Shellfish Constable 
Robert Kneeland, Deputy Constable 
Evan Parker, Deputy Constable 

The highlight of the shellfishing year was the successful 
opening of the Ipswich River flats to clamming. During the 
56 "clamming" days these flats were opened, 9, 552 bushels 
of clams were harvested. 







The flats in general were not as prolific as they have been 
in past years. This seems to be a cyclical phenomenon, and 
not necessarily a threat to the industry. The Department 
continues to monitor the health of the flats and the water 
quality that effect them. 

On April 29 th ' the clammers banded together and donated the 
monetary proceeds of 150 bushels of clams to the Collum 
Family Fire Fund. This significant contribution attests to 
the generosity and community caring of those who work so 
hard clamming. 

Over the year 2001, the amount of rainfall had a 
significant effect on the number of days the flats were 
closed to shellfishing. A total of 50 days in Area 4 were 
lost and 35 days in Area 7. 

The Department continues to be grateful to the Shellfish 
Advisory Board for their advice, to various state agencies 



101 



for their partnership in keeping the industry healthy, to 
the clammers, and to the citizens. Without their caring 
and support, our job would be much more difficult. 

Resident Yearly 77 

Resident Family 169 

Resident Commercial 120 

Over 60 Free Recreational 24 

Non-resident Yearly 87 

Non-resident Daily 30 

Eagle Hill Stickers 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

John Poirier, Director 

The year 2001 was one of the busiest and most challenging 
for the Emergency Management Department. 

In mid-March, we experienced several snow storms which 
severely taxed our resources and resulted in a statewide 
declaration of a snow emergency. As a result, this 
department assisted the Town in recovering approximately 
$43,000 in federal assistance for snow related clean-up 
costs . 

In late March, mother-nature provided another challenge; 
this time in the form of rainfall in excess of six inches. 
Several streets had to be closed, and many cellars were 
flooded. The Department distributed over 1000 sand bags to 
local citizens and businesses to assist them in diverting 
the flow of water. The Department coordinated recovery 
efforts with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. They 
sent two teams of experts to our Town to assess damage and 
to aid citizens in recuperating costs to repair the damage. 

When terrorists struck New York City and Washington, D.C., 
on September 11 th , new emphasis was brought to bear on our 
emergency response and planning efforts. I am happy to 
report that, comparatively, we are in excellent shape. 
Nevertheless, the Department became even more involved with 
the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency and the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency in assessing potential 
targets of opportunity and in ensuring that our emergency 
workers were trained and prepared to meet any threats the 



102 



community may face. The Department coordinated efforts 
with other local governmental agencies in preparing a 
response protocol to threat and potential threats, 
especially with regard to biological incidents; and it 
assisted other private and public entities in evaluating 
their vulnerability and what could be done to reduce this. 
The Department recently coordinated a training effort to 
bring awareness training to local and area firefighters and 
police officers. 

Over the course of the year, the Department led efforts to 
bring the Town into compliance with the state and federal 
mandated requirements under hazardous material reporting 
and response laws. The Local Emergency Planning Committee 
was revitalized and the Town joined the Merrimack Valley 
Local Emergency Planning Committee. This organization will 
be of great assistance in the event we suffer from a 
hazardous material spill or other related incident. 

Several individuals have expressed an interest in becoming 
more involved in local emergency efforts. They are being 
certified as volunteers by the Red Cross. The Department 
will meet with them to coordinate their efforts in the near 
future . 

As always the Department would like to thank you for your 
support. Please be assured that this small agency is well 
prepared and will do all that it can to assist you in the 
event of any catastrophic occurrence. 

■k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k 

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTORATE - Armand T. Michaud, Director 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Armand T. Michaud, Manager 

The Public Works Department coordinates the activities of 
the following divisions: Public Works Administration, 
Highway, Cemetery/Parks Division, Equipment Maintenance, 
Transfer Station, Rubbish Disposal, Recycling, and Snow and 
Ice Control. Each Division is charged with particular 
responsibilities relating to its duties. When additional 
manpower is required to perform specific tasks, personnel 
are interchanged within the divisions. 



103 



SNOW AND ICE CONTROL 

The Public Works Divisions combine their work forces during 
the winter months. Other personnel assisting the Public 
Works crews were from the Cemetery, Water, and Water 
Treatment Departments. The winter of 2000/2001 was an 
average winter. 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 
Robert Hetnar, Diesel Mechanic 

All Public Works vehicles are serviced and repaired at the 
Town Highway Garage. At present there are 54 pieces of 
motorized equipment that must be kept in good operating 
condition to insure its availability when needed. Operation 
cost records showing maintenance and gas/oil expenses on 
each vehicle can be ascertained from the Public Works 
Administration Office in the Town Hall. A large truck and a 
small truck were purchased this year. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Routine maintenance and minor repairs were performed at the 
Town Hall and Municipal Garage throughout the year. The 
"Big Move" to the new Town Hall, 25 Green Street, was done 
on June 18 and 19 to be open for the public the following 
Monday. The District Court now occupies the whole first 
floor of the "Old Town Hall", 30 South Main Street. 
Richard Jones was hired in August to be the Facilities 
Director. His responsibilities encompass all the Town's 
buildings including the Schools. 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 
Norman Stone, Foreman 

The Highway Division is charged with the maintenance and 
repairing of the Town's streets and drainage systems. The 
winter schedule consists mainly of Snow and Ice Control and 
routine maintenance that does not require excavations. 
During the other three seasons, the men are kept busy with 
projects varying from road construction to street sweeping. 
Normal maintenance consists of patching streets, repairing 
Town's drains, repairing sidewalks, and sign maintenance. 
All catch basins in Town were cleaned. Several plugged 
drains were cleared. Street sweeping was performed twice a 
week in the downtown area from April to December. All Town 
roads and sidewalks were swept in the spring to rid them of 
winter sand deposits. Crosswalks, parking spaces, and 
traffic lines were painted in the downtown areas. 
Crosswalks were painted with white tiger stripes. Also 



104 



142,239 lineal feet of center lines and fog lines were 
painted. All gravel roads were graded twice in 2000/2001 




County Street seawall reconstruction 



Upper Brownville Avenue was reclaimed and hot topped. 
Sidewalks were also constructed on Brownville Avenue and a 
small area on High Street. Using Chapter 90 money, 
Topsfield Road was chip sealed. 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

The men are doing the usual Forestry work plus 
approximately six months of line clearing for the Electric 
Department. They did brush cutting in various areas in the 
Town. They also pruned some trees and removed approximately 
75 trees. 

TRANSFER STATION 

The Transfer Station seems to be running well. Recycling 
bins for cans, glass, co-mingled paper, cardboard, tires, 
and batteries are on the site. Approximately 350 people use 
this facility per week. There is an area for white goods, 
metals, four foot fluorescent bulbs, and crt's/tv's. Leaves 
and yard waste may be hauled there year around. There is a 
Salvation Army bin for used clothing. There were three 
paint collections last fall done by appointment only. The 
paint collection will start up again in May of 2002. There 
is also a container for cans for the Boy Scouts. 

SANITATION 

Look for yearly calendar and updates in local newspapers. 



105 



CEMETERIES /PARKS DEPARTMENT 

James E. Graff um, superintendent 

The Cemeteries/Parks Division continues to maintain the 217 
acres of land under its jurisdiction, consisting of nine 
cemeteries, five playgrounds, and several areas of open 
space land including all Town Commons. 

The Town boardwalk at Crane Beach was once again severely 
damaged due to very high tides and gale force winds from 
several winter storms. In an attempt to prevent similar 
future harm, the boardwalk was redesigned and reconstructed 
in the hope that future damage would not occur. 

The old Softball field under the lights at Bialek Park was 
completely renovated to allow use by the Girls Little 
League teams. Also, goal posts and additional bleacher 
seating were installed at Bialek Park to accommodate the 
fans at home games for the Ipswich High School football 
season. 

The Cemetery Parks staff assists the Public Works 
Department in the snow removal/sanding operation, as well 
as any emergencies as needed. 

Revenues 

Chapel Tent " $1,275 

Foundations 4,067 

Openings 35, 600 

Perpetual Care 6,750 

Sale of Lots 10, 400 

Total $58,092 

■k-k-k-k'k-k-k-k 

SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Jim Temple, Chair 

Recycling by our residents has continued well enough to 
maintain a favorable position relative to our neighbors in 
Essex County. The level of recycling within individual 
households has varied from excellent to very poor, with 
most going very well - thank you. Note the extremes shown 
in the photos below. 



106 



Recycling tonnage was 1,225 for FY01, an improvement of 36 
tons over FYOO. MASS DEP continued to pay a $10/ton 
incentive for each ton recycled. We also receive $20/ton 
for each ton of increase which is a nice incentive. With 
the savings resulting from curbside recycling, reducing 
trash tonnage, tipping, plus the DEP incentive payments, 
cost to the Town for curbside recycling was only $549. Each 
year, MASS DEP makes it more challenging to qualify for the 
incentive money (MRIP) . 

We also monitor the level of trash, (tipping tons) being 
incinerated, knowing that increased recycling, reducing and 
reusing means less trash This year, Ipswich incinerated 
4,782 Tons vs. 4,568 IN FYOO. Since tipping fees were 
$72/ton and are now $75.38, any increase in trash will be a 
major concern. 

Recycling in the schools has gone very well using the 
equipment and arrangements for collection made last year. 
We have interested persons leading the effort in all areas 
- especially in the food service area at the middle 
school/high school. In that area, preparation of the 
cardboard and the large "tin" cans has been outstanding. 
Now the big item is "pay for throw" . We are big advocates 
since it is the most effective and fair way to pay for 
trash as well as the best motivation for recycling. Our 
prime responsibility now is to see that the Town 
understands what it is and the benefits should it be 
proposed for Ipswich. Topsfield and Boxford are the two 
closest towns that have implemented this method. 




EXCELLENT RECYCLING 



OVER-MAX TRASH 
NO RECYCLING 



107 



******** 



DEPARTMENT OF CODE ENFORCEMENT - James A. Sperber, Director 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

James A. Sperber, Building Inspector 



CATEGORY 


#OF PERMITS 


TOTAL FEES 


VALUE OF 


CONSTRUCTION 












Single family (att.) 


53 




$11,190.00 




$1,454,700.00 


Single family (det.) 


32 




50,916.00 




7,924,280.00 


Additions (residential) 


62 




21,691.00 




2,884,912.00 


Add/alter (commercial) 


13 




7,325.00 




1,312,200.00 


Demolish & reonst. 


1 




1,600.00 




225,000.00 


Remodel 


145 




26,968.00 




3,554,097.00 


Repair (incl. roofs) 


210 




13,714.00 




1,363,175.00 


Siding/windows 


9 




1,197.00 




192,458.00 


Sun decks/porches 


38 




2,627.00 




194,050.00 


Detached aces, structs. 


7 




1,602.00 




173,000.00 


Swimming pools 


10 




952.00 




91,500.00 


Fences 


10 




450.00 




24,387.00 


Tent 


1 




35.00 




556.00 


Sign 


1 




35.00 




1,000.00 


Stoves 


7 




245.00 




10,400.00 


Demolition 


15 




948.00 




191,615.00 


Miscellaneous 


4 




105.00 




8,000.00 


Certificate of Occupancy101 




3,100.00 








719 


$143,500.00 






Totals 


$19,606,530.00 


Annual inspections 


18 




$640.00 






PLUMBING & GAS 












PLUMBING 




TOTAL FEE 

$16,975.00 

448 


GAS 
235 


TOTAL FEE 


213 


$10,130.00 


Total plumbing & gas 




Total permit fees 




$27,105.00 


Total to Inspector R. Hyde 
Total Town of Ipswich 


i $13,552.50 
13 50 



I would like to again thank all residents and valued staff 
for helping the Department of Code Enforcement provide 
excellent customer service. 

Special thanks should go to Mr. James Lahar. Mr. Lahar has 
continued to provide volunteer service to the department 
even though he will not benefit from the volunteer tax 



108 



program. His services are valued throughout this 
department. Thanks Jim! 

******** 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Colleen E. Fermon, Health Agent 

The following is the yearly report of the activities of the 
Health Department, for the year 1999: 

LICENSES AND PERMITS ISSUED 

Food Service 53 

Retail Food 20 

Caterer 5 

Temporary Food 12 

Mobile Food 

Disposal Works Construction Permits 84 

Septic Haulers 17 

Septic Installers 58 

Swimming Pools 4 

Recreational Camps 3 

Massage Therapy 20 

Tobacco 17 

Funeral Director 2 

HEALTH INSPECTIONS AND INVESTIGATIONS 

Food Service Inspections 93 

Housing Inspections 16 

Nuisance & Environmental Complaints 60 

Percolation Tests 177 

Septic System Inspections 210 

Swimming Pool Inspections 4 

Surface Water Testing 24 

COMMUNITY HEALTH 

Immunizations & Clinics 
Communicable Disease Investigations/Follow-Up 

Influenza 612 

Salmonella 2 

Pneumonia 22 

Lyme 15 

Tetanus 1 

Giardia 4 

Mantoux Tests 6 

Campylobacter 2 



109 



Well Elderly Clinics 12 

Hepatitis B 1 

Hepatitis C 6 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES INSPECTIONS 

Gasoline Pumps 83 

Oil Trucks 5 

Apothecary 

Scales or Balances 77 

Health Agent John R. Garside resigned in August. Health 
Agent Colleen E. Pelley started in November. 

In June, the Board of Health adopted the Sale of Tobacco 
Products to Minors Regulation. 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Keith B. Hughes, Chair 

James A. Sperber, Director of Code Enforcement 

Linda F. Valle, Administrative Assistant 

There were ninety-three (93) petitions before the Zoning 
Board of Appeals in 2001, a decrease of three (3) from 
2000. There were four (4) Appeals of the Building 
Inspector's decisions (two more than 2000), all of whic^ 
were denied. There were thirty-four (34) Special Permit 
requests (down from fifty-five [55] in 2000) . Twenty-eight 
(28) were granted, six (6) were denied, and nine (9) were 
granted with conditions. There were fifty-one (51) Variance 
requests (up sixteen [16] from 2000) . Forty-two (42) were 
granted, five (5) were withdrawn, six (6) were denied, and 
eleven (11) were granted with conditions. 

There were three (3) requests for Comprehensive Permits 
(down one [1] from 2000) . The three were granted with 
conditions. The process for the Comprehensive Permits is 
extensive, and it is time-consuming for both the Board 
Members and the Administrative Assistant. 

The Board finds its need for administrative support 
continues to increase. Files are constantly updated and 
entered on a database. 

The Zoning Board of Appeals is composed of five Members and 
two Alternate Members, all of whom are appointed and are 



110 



unpaid volunteers. Keith B. Hughes was the Board's Chair. 
David G. Mollica, Jennifer T. Walker (until August 16 th ), 
and Robert A. Gambale (as of October 18 th ) were the Vice- 
Chairs. The other Members were Arthur N. Sotis and Richard 
C. Alfoni. The Alternate Members were Kevin B. Lombard and 
Roger D Le Blanc (as of September 13 th ) . The Members and 
Alternate Members continue to make contributions to the 
Board. 

After many years of outstanding service to the Town, 
Jennifer Walker left to move to Florida with her family. 
Her resignation was accepted with regret. We wish her the 
best . 

The Board would also like to thank Jim Sperber, the 
Building Inspector, and Linda Valle, the Board's 
Administrative Assistant, for their administrative support 
and a job well-done. 

******** 
DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT - Glenn C. Gibbs, Director 

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 

Glenn C. Gibbs, Director 

The Department of Planning & Development is responsible for 
guiding the development and conservation of land in the 
Town of Ipswich, both through the regulatory process and 
through the development and implementation of long-range 
plans. It does this in part by providing support and 
guidance for each of the boards and commissions within its 
directorate: Planning Board, Conservation Commission, the 
Historical Commission, and the Housing Partnership 
Committee (reports on their activities are given below) . 
The Department also provides support to the Open Space 
Committee and various ad hoc committees. Listed below are 
some of the initiatives undertaken by the Department in 
2001. 

> Rewrote inclusionary housing bylaw to encourage more 

development of affordable housing in Town. 
f Prepared, in conjunction with Oak Hill Inc., three 

successful grant applications for a total of $1.3 

million, to convert the Memorial Building into seven 

units of affordable elderly rental housing. 



Ill 



> Selected planning consultant and coordinated preparation 
of draft Community Development Plan for the Town. 

> Submitted, in conjunction with the consulting firm of 
VHB, Inc., successful $228,000 grant application to the 
State Department of Environmental Protection for funds to 
install drainage improvements in the North Main 
Street/North Green area. 

> Drafted nine zoning articles, including several that 
supported the Town's growth management initiative (e.g., 
allowing dwelling in accessory buildings in IR District; 
rezoning certain areas in town center from Industrial to 
Business, to promote mix-used development; modified open 
space Preservation provision to encourage its use.) 

> Assisted Whipple School Annex Reuse Committee in 
selecting developer to pursue conversion of annex into 
ten units of affordable elderly rental housing. 

> Under the leadership of Tracie Hines, Open Space Program 
Manager, took the following actions to protect properties 
listed as critical open space by the Open Space Bond 
authorization: 

• Prepared successful $1 million grant application 
to U.S. Fisheries and Wildlife and secured 
$500, 000 commitment from State to partially 
defray Town's cost of purchasing 91 acres of 106 
acre Wendel property on Jeffreys Neck Road for 
permanent conservation restriction and public 
access. Town's contribution from bond fund: $2 
million. 




Wendel Property on Jeffrys Neck Road 



Purchased Conservation Restriction over 45 acres 
of 83.5 acre Scott Farm on Mill Road for $1.45 
million. Remainder of property limited to four 
ANR lots or eight lot cluster subdivision. 



112 



• In partnership with Essex County Greenbelt and 
State DEM, acquired partial fee interest in 40- 
acre parcel in Willowdale Forest for $300,000. 
State DEM holds majority fee interest and will 
manage property. 

• Purchased 16.9 acre Smolenski parcel off High 
Street for $29,900. Property is located in 
watershed of the Dow Brook Reservoir. 

• In process of purchasing 29.5 acre parcel off 
Paradise Road as potential future site of the 
Brown's Well municipal water supply. Slated for 
acquisition in April 2002. 

******** 

PLANNING BOARD 

Leslie F. Brooks, Chair 

The Planning Board had another busy year in 2001, which 
also saw changes in Board membership. Departing from the 
Board this year were Leo Murphy, Jan Heintzmann-Lindsay, 
and Associate Member David Morrow. Leo and Jan were 
replaced by Charlie Allen and Mike Ryan, who joined Board 
members Bob Weatherall, Josh Massey, and Leslie Brooks. 
David Santomenna replaced David Morrow as Associate Member. 

The Board continued to work with Turner Hill and New 
England Biolabs (NEB) in 2001 on special permit 
applications for Great Estates Preservation Developments on 
I their respective properties. Final action is expected on 
both projects by the summer of 2002. 

Previous Planning Board approvals of NEB' s special permit 
applications for biotech processing, redelineation of the 
water supply district boundary, a small wastewater 
treatment facility and the GEPD are being appealed by a 
neighborhood group opposing the project. 

At year's end, the Board endorsed the twenty-lot Open Space 
Preservation Definitive Subdivision plan for 51 Boxford 
Road, a development to be known as Winchester Farms. A 
proposed development off Gravelly Brook Road in the 
Willowdale State Forest was removed from consideration when 
the property was purchased through a joint effort by the 
Department of Environmental Management and the Towns of 
Ipswich and Topsfield. 



113 



The Board reviewed nine applications for site plan review 
during this past year, two of these as part of Turner 
Hill's and NE Biolabs' submissions. Two were modifications 
to earlier decisions, and two others were in conjunction 
with special permit applications. Of these, two were 
approved, one was withdrawn, and the remaining six are 
pending. 

Seventeen special permit applications were also filed with 
the Planning Board. Approved applications include an 8 
unit condominium project at 51 & 55 Linebrook Road (access 
from Kimball Avenue) , an accessory apartment in a 
commercial building at 78 Central Street, a mixed use 
residential/commercial building at 154 High Street, and a 
mixed use residential/commercial building at 17 Hammatt 
Street . 

Other Board activities included hearings regarding a road 
improvement plan, endorsement of a plan under the scenic 
roads act, and public hearings regarding proposed revisions 
to the Ipswich Zoning By-Law. Form B and Form C 
applications made to the Board in 2000 regarding a property 
at 7 Cogswell Street are pending. The Board also reviewed 
and endorsed 17 applications for ANR (Approval Not Required 
Under Subdivision Control Law) plans. 

The Board wishes to acknowledge the hard work of Glenn 
Gibbs, Director of Planning and Development, and Joan 
Vontzalides, Planning Assistant. We look forward to 
another busy and productive year. 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

David Standley, Chair 

David Pancoast, Conservation Agent 

Marie Rodgers, Recording Secretary 

The Conservation Commission is composed of seven appointed 
town residents who serve as unpaid volunteers. During 2001, 
senior member Brandon Boyd stepped down and was replaced in 
August by Ann McMenemy, a professional wetlands scientist 
who brings much practical experience to the Commission to 
supplement that of other members, who are Dave Standley, 
PE, Chair and former Commissioner of Mass. DEQE and also 
currently a member of the Ipswich Open Space Committee; 
Glenn Wood, Esq., an environmental attorney; Mary Capkanis, 



114 



Vice Chair, who is also a professional wetlands scientist; 
Sandra Hamilton, a teacher, who has significant vernal pool 
experience; Ed Dick, a local realtor who brings the 
perspective of homebuyers and sellers as well as others who 
apply for projects; and Jennifer Hughes, a former member of 
the Grafton, MA Conservation Commission. Staff support is 
provided by David Pancoast, Conservation Agent; Marie 
Rodgers, Recording Secretary, who prepares legal notices, 
records and transcribes meeting minutes and does myriad 
administrative tasks as well; and former Chair Lil North, 
who provides volunteer administrative assistance. 

Former Conservation Agent Kathryn Campbell Glenn left at 
the end of 2000 to pursue other opportunities and currently 
serves with the regional Mass Coastal Zone Management 
office in Gloucester. She was replaced in February 2001 
by David Pancoast, an attorney with a BA in Zoology. David 
brings experience to the Commission from serving as agent 
for two other Massachusetts communities. 

The Commission continues its role as an advisor to other 
municipal officials and boards on the conservation aspects 
of those other boards' areas of responsibility. The 
Commission serves the public as a provider of information 
on conservation and land preservation activities in the 
community. Most of the Commission's time is occupied with 
its significant role as local environmental regulatory 
board under the Mass Wetlands Protection Act and local 
Ipswich Wetlands Protection By-Law. The Commission may 
accept gifts of land or money or other value for 
conservation purposes. This year the Commission revised 
its regulations to expand the protective nature of buffer 
zones . 

In 2001, the Commission continued to serve our community 
through regulatory review of several complex projects, 
including New England Biolabs' proposal to construct new 
quarters at the former Don Bosco Estate on County Road and 
the proposal to construct an eighteen hole golf course and 
housing development at the former La Salette Shrine/Rice 
Estate known as Turner Hill on Topsfield Road. The public 
hearing for that project opened in January and was closed 
on November 1, 2001 culminating in the issuance of a 
positive Order of Conditions. 

The Commission also reviewed two MGL Ch. 40B affordable 
housing developments: a 48 unit multi-family project on 



115 



High Street, and a three-unit single-family development on 
Essex Road. In addition, the Commission addressed the issue 
of beaver activity management and is assisting the town in 
developing a policy to encourage use of water level/flow 
control devices known as beaver deceivers. This year the 
Commission took nearly 160 official actions, as listed 
below, which demonstrates the permitting activities as 
compared with the previous five years. Notable is the 
reduction in the number of Notices of Intent filed as 
compared to previous years, a downturn possibly connected 
with a slowdown in the regional economy. To accomplish 
this permitting process, Commission members attended 
twenty-four regularly scheduled evening meetings, nine 
special meetings for the Turner Hill project, visited 
numerous projects, and fielded dozens of citizen's queries. 

1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 



Notices of Intent 


56 


62 


52 


77 


44 


36 


Orders of Conditions 


55 


59 


64 


63 


40 


43 


Abbreviated Notices of Resource 














Area Delineation 












5 


Requests for Determination 


38 


67 


47 


26 


45 


27 


of Applicability 














Certificates of Compliance 


17 


10 


16 


25 


13 


24 


Extension Permit 


3 


5 


5 


2 


14 


12 


Enforcement Orders 


2 


5 


6 


8 


10 


8 



EMPACT GRANT REPORT 

As part of the EPA- funded EMPACT Grant awarded to the 
Town's Conservation Commission in December 2000, portions 
of the Ipswich River and Parker River Watersheds were 
monitored during the summer and fall of 2001. Under the 
scientific direction of The University of New Hampshire and 
in collaboration with a number of organizations including 
the Ipswich River Watershed Association, the Parker River 
Clean Water Association, the State of Massachusetts 
Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, Marine 
Biological Laboratories and others, the Town purchased 
water quality monitoring equipment with funds from the 
grant. The equipment was deployed in specific locations 
within the watershed and programmed to gather data on a 
number of parameters in an attempt to better understand the 
impact of development and water withdrawals on the rivers. 

The results of the monitoring, as well as other important 
data and information relevant to the quality and quantity 



116 



of water in the watersheds, are accessible through a 
website that was created as part of the grant. The website 
is dedicated as a public resource for watershed and river 
related information, specific to the health of the Ipswich 
River and Parker River watersheds. The address for the 



'^*fpfefe^. 



#'7/ * 




website, which has been named IPSWATCH (Ipswich Parker 
Suburban WATershed Channel) and is still being developed, 
is www . ipswatch . sr . unh . edu . 



The year 2002 will be the final year of work on the grant. 
The main objectives will be to interpret the results of 
this past year's monitoring results, continue to develop 
the IPSWATCH website, deploy the monitoring equipment for 
another season of monitoring, and expand the outreach and 
public education of our project. 

For additional information on the EMPACT program, contact 
Beth O'Connor, Grant Coordinator, (978) 356-6661. 

■k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John P. Moss Jr., Chair 

The year 2001 was an eventful year for the Historical 
Commission. While progress was made in bringing historical 
preservation to the public forefront, we experienced great 
loss with the passing of Mary Conley. Mary was member and 
former chairperson of the Commission. With her husband, 
John, she helped to establish the original Commission. She 
will be greatly missed by the Commission, the historical 
preservation community and the entire town. 

The annual award in Mary's name was given to the Trustees 
of Reservations for their efforts in restoring the "Brown 
Cottage" into an elegant bed and breakfast and the 



117 



restoration of "Dodge" home as part of Greenwood Farms. 
Their work at Appleton Farms is another example of the 
Trustees faithful preservation of Ipswich's assets. 

Four other estates figured prominently in the year's 
events. The Commission toured the Turner Hill development, 
which is being restored to its original splendor by local 
developer Ted Raymond. New England Biolabs is continuing 
the restoration of the main house at the former Don Bosco 
estate. The Sisters of Notre Dame are still attempting to 
find a use for the old Searle Estate mansion. And the 
Wendel Estate figured prominently in several town meetings 
as the town struggled with the purchase of open space and 
the preservation of the first period buildings on the 
property. It looks as if the buildings and the land will be 
preserved thanks to the efforts of the Trust for Public 
Land, the Open Space Committee, the selectmen and Planning 
and Development Office. All of these projects served to 
keep the preservation of Ipswich's Historical assets in the 
public eye. 

On the national level, Ipswich was also in the spotlight as 
the Smithsonian opened its exhibit featuring the "Ipswich" 
house, which was saved years ago through the efforts of 
local preservationists. It now stands a national monument 
and a wonderful affirmation of the value of historical 
preservation. Locally, individual homes still remained 
endangered. Our efforts to preserve the Knowlton house on 
County Street continued as negotiations for the sale of the 
property began anew. 

Finally, we began work on forming a cooperative effort with 
the Historical Society to pursue our mutual goals. We hope 
to continue this collaboration in the years to come. 
Together with the society we hope to be more powerful 
advocates for historical preservation and the appreciation 
of the history of Ipswich. Finishing the year we began to 
aid in efforts to establish a "Shurcliff Park" by the cove 
and to explore the possibility of historically significant 
sites near the High Street burial ground. 

Historical preservation has had a good year in 2001. We 
hope this trend will continue and look forward to any 
assistance from citizens who are not formally associated 
with the Commission. 



118 



kkkkkkkk 



HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

Marie Rodgers, Housing Coordinator 

Families who have never owned a home are eligible to 
receive financial assistance through the Town' s First-Time 
Homebuyers Program. The program is funded by the U.S. 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, the HOME 
Program and the Massachusetts Department of Housing and 
Community Development. Funds are processed through the 
North Shore HOME Consortium in Peabody. 

Each qualifying family receives a no interest, deferred 
payment loan. The maximum loan amount is five percent of 
the purchase price of the home or $6,500, whichever is 
less. The load, which must be matched by the buyer at the 
time of closing, does not need to be paid back until the 
home is sold or transferred. 

As coordinator, I review and evaluate loan applications and 
perform the required administrative duties. In 2001, two 
families received a total of $12,400 in financial 
assistance through the Town' s First Time Homebuyers 
Program. Both families were selected in a lottery to buy 
an affordable condominium unit in the Mill Place 
Development on Brownville Avenue. Two loans were also 
discharged during the year, in the amount of $9,150. These 
funds were reallocated to the Town' s available funds for 
downpayment assistance. 

kkkkkkkk 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES - Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Elizabeth M. Dorman, Recreation Director 

A variety of programs, services, and activities were 
organized for all age groups including a number of 
community-based social services. 

Family events included the July 4th Parade & Field Day, the 
annual Marathon, a Halloween Parade & program, and the 
Memorial Day and Veterans' Day parades organized by local 
veterans' groups. Cooperation with the Ipswich Business 
Association again facilitated Santa's arrival with a parade 



119 



from School Street to Town Hill for tree lighting 
ceremonies and caroling. 

Summer offerings included tennis lessons at Bialek Park, 
teen golf at the Ipswich Country Club, Workreation and 
Adventure Camp for young teens, Kids Day Camp, the annual 
youth Sand Sculpture Day at Crane's Beach, and drop-in 
activities at Bialek Park with optional day trips. Swim 
lessons with busing were contracted at the YMCA, parking 
attendants were contracted for the resident lot at Crane 
Beach, and lifeguards were provided at Pavilion Beach. 

Efforts continued on the project to build a skate park at 
Bialek Park that is being funded partly by a grant from 
Pepsi Cola and proceeds from their vending machines at the 
park. A few smaller, portable ramps and rails were 
purchased in the fall and assembled by a group of volunteer 
parents and students for use until tennis resumes on the 
court area in the spring. 




Summer evening programs featured the West Newbury Volunteer 
Fire Association Band, a UNH Caravan Show, a magic show by 
Rich Nunziato on "Harry Potter's Birthday", and a Kids Dog 
Show with a demonstration by the Old Colony Obedience Club. 
The Recreation Department-sponsored community band played 
outdoors at Cable Gardens and were joined by the community 
chorus for another concert at Castle Hill. 

Fall activities included Creative Cuisine for Kids, Friday 
Frolics, a Helping Hands quilting and knitting group, and a 
number of other small, after-school offerings. Winter 
programs included two learn-to-ski programs for grades 3-5 
and 6-8, several February vacation week activities, and 
adult volleyball and ping pong offerings. Spring and fall 



120 



sessions of after-school youth golf classes were again 
offered at the Rowley Country Club. 

We bid a fond farewell to the Memorial Building in June and 
moved to spacious new quarters in the Town Hall facility on 
Green Street. A nicely furnished teen center was well 
received by the youth population as well as some senior 
citizens who use the pool tables during the day. A computer 
room has been gradually furnished by systems replaced in 
Town offices as well as some donated by private citizens. A 
program room, kitchen and snack bar area, storage pantry, 
cafeteria/lounge, crafts room, and gymnasium are being 
shared by the Recreation Department, the Council on Aging, 
and number of evening users for a variety of programs and 
services . 

The seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation 
Director met regularly throughout the year to discuss 
programs, facilities, and policies as well as to plan for 
the future. Members continued to volunteer at a number of 
programs . 



******** 



YOUTH SERVICES 

Marcia Ford, Youth Director 

Youth services in Ipswich are dedicated to improving the 
lives of Ipswich youth by offering a number of varied 
programs to meet recreational, academic, and social needs of 
this unique population. The foundation of the Youth Services 
Program continues to be community collaboration; and many 
programs were developed as joint ventures with other local 
agencies in direct response to community needs. 

The theme of teamwork and community cooperation continues 
to be the basis of Ipswich Youth Services. As a result of 
the Emotional Intelligence Program at the middle/high 
school, and at the request of local agencies and parents, 
an after school Social Skills Group was developed to 
provide a training program utilizing emotional 
intelligence. Ten elementary students have met since 
October, once a week for three hours. 



121 




Community service projects were organized for volunteer 
teens, church youth groups, and those referred through the 
local courts and Juvenile Diversion programs. They were 
involved in cleaning and painting projects, outdoor work at 
park sites, and some services for needy senior citizens. 

Classes in cooking, knitting, computer science and 
community service fill the after school calendar. In 
addition, many intergenerational programs have developed. 
Senior citizens continue to teach children knitting and 
quilting. "That was Then, This is Now", the Tuesday after 
school intergenerational program, offers group games and 
activities among Senior Citizens, elementary students from 
the Extended Day Program and Recreation youth. 

Talk To a Friend, our peer leadership program for Ipswich 
Youth, met weekly to receive training based on current youth 
issues. Peer Leaders also helped chaperone activities for 
younger children, assumed some mentoring and mediation 
responsibilities, performed a requested skit at North Shore 
Community College on mental health issues, and served as 
advisors on teen policies and programs. As a result of the 
peer leaders public speaking, the Mental Illness Education 
Project Inc. invited several teens to be co-stars in a film 
depicting the lives of teens. 

The Zone Cafe is well on the way. An ad hoc committee wa c 
formed to oversee the program. They meet the first Monday 
of every month. Members of Talk to a Friend chair the 
committee, and the first order of business was to formalize 
program goals. The short-term goals are: develop policies 
and procedures, create an after-school canteen for middle 
school students, create twice monthly dance club/cafe for 



122 



high school students, and create a general awareness of the 
Zone Cafe while increasing community participation. Long- 
term goals include creating a drug free zone for youth and 
to form a non-profit corporation, which will provide 
employment, education, social skills, job training, 
rehabilitation, fun and entertainment for Ipswich Youth. 

Family advocacy services were provided on an as-needed basis 
to families in need who met with the youth director to 
determine current needs of the family and secure connections 
to available services. Regular meetings with the family 
provided further monitoring and coordination of related 
services. In addition, the director was available for after- 
hours support and crisis intervention for at-risk families. 

Students from Gordon-Conwell Seminary who are pursuing 
graduate level degrees in counseling have been seeking 
internships with our Human Services Department because of the 
opportunities we can provide for direct, supervised 
experience, weekly staff collaboration, and relevant 
training. 



******** 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Diane Mitchell, Director 

A wide variety of programs for senior citizens of Ipswich 
were provided under the umbrella of Council on Aging 
Services . 

A senior center operated weekdays, 8:00-4:00, from a 
storefront on Central Street through the end of June. The 
renovation of the Whipple Middle School into the new 
Ipswich Town Hall provided the Council on Aging with over 
4,000 sq. feet of space since July. Four part-time 
receptionists welcomed guests, answered the phone, and 
assisted with the daily operation of the center. 

Regular programs included the Silver Strands choral group, 
a book discussion group, travel club, bridge and card 
groups, knitting and quilting groups, art classes, monthly 
lunch club, and movies. Health-related programs included 
monthly health screenings, weekly blood pressure clinics, 
Tai Chi, tennis, exercise and line dancing classes, a 
walking club, and a swimming group. Tickets were sold for 
day trips sponsored by the Recreation Department and the 
Friends of the Ipswich Elderly. 



123 




Julia Dudzisz and Charlotte Frederick 
having a good time at the summer picnic 

Special offerings included inter-generational programs, a 
summer picnic, cooking classes, speakers on a variety of 
health, financial and legal issues, social gatherings for 
special observances, and classes for a wide range of 
interests. A monthly newsletter written by the director 
reached 1,700 elder households through support of local 
advertisers and a grant for postage. A Caregivers Support 
Group helped those dealing with frail elders. The Director 
continued to coordinate the Senior Citizen Property Tax 
Work-Off Program which placed 10 senior citizens in paid 
positions in various Town departments. 

A handicapped accessible, 12-passenger van continued to 
provide local transportation to Ipswich seniors. 
Ridership has steadily increased providing over 7500 one- 
way rides and logging approximately 17,160 miles of 
service. The Friends group continued to raise funds and 
support projects that fall outside of the COA budget, 
including a new refrigerator for the new kitchen. The 
Friends also contributed to a Christmas party for 175 
seniors held at the Gymnasium at the Town Hall. Grants from 
the Executive Office of Elder Affairs and the Coburn 
Charitable Society provided a part-time administrative 
assistant, a volunteer recognition luncheon, a portion of 
the drivers' salary and gasoline for the COA van. 

The Outreach program enlisted a corps of 40 volunteers who 
provided 1,713 hours of volunteer service to local elders. 
This program also provided volunteers who drove senior 
citizens 18,909 miles to out-of-town medical appointments. 



124 



Other services of the Outreach program included social 
visits, phone calls, help with chores, and guidance in 
making personal, medical, housing and financial decisions. 
The Outreach program served 443 senior citizens during the 
year. Other assistance included Money Management and Bill 
Paying for elders. An AARP-funded Senior Aide provided 
assistance with the Friendly Visitors Program. 

Town contributions to Action, Inc. provided fuel assistance 
to those who qualified as well as Income Tax Assistance to 
any elder who needed guidance. Contributions to SeniorCare 
provided support for elderly still living on their own who 
needed outside support to facilitate their independent 
living arrangements. 

A seven-member council met monthly to review programs and 
operations and plan additional offerings. 

•k-kk-k-k-k-k-k 

UTILITIES DEPARTMENT - Timothy J. Henry, Director 

ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 

Raymond R. Shockey - Manager 

The year 2001 saw some of the volatility disappear from the 
deregulated electric supply market in Massachusetts. While 
some areas of the country, particularly California, 
experienced dramatic increases in wholesale prices due to 
inadequate supply and other factors, New England did not 
experience such increases. As a consequence, Ipswich 
ratepayers saw their bills decrease slightly over those of 
the year 2000 and should experience another slight decrease 
in 2002. The electric marketplace still requires constant 
attention and remains potentially volatile in the near 
term. The Ipswich Light Department is investigating a 
number of opportunities to purchase favorable mid- to long- 
term contracts to lower and stabilize power costs for our 
customers . 

We completed the first phase of an assessment of our 
generating plant regarding its operation and position in 
the marketplace. As a result, in June, we changed the 
staffing of the plant from 24 hours, seven days a week, to 
16 hours a day, five days a week except holidays. This 
enabled us to not only realize cost savings but also to 
allow the use of the additional available personnel to work 



125 



on projects that might have been contracted to outside 
sources . 

On a sad note, we lost Operations Superintendent Louis 
Balboni, Jr. to cancer in July. Lou was the heart and 
spirit of the Ipswich power plant for over twenty years and 
will be sorely missed. 

In 2001, we continued to convert our electric system to a 
higher, more efficient, voltage and made significant gains 
to that end. We also made further progress on our High 
Street substation modernization as well as receiving 
material and equipment for the expansion of the Fowlers 
Lane substation. In conjunction with these projects, we are 
updating and computerizing our substation drawings, 
records, and operating procedures. 

Kilowatt-hour sales increased 3.8% over 2000. 

2000 sales: 84,193,000 

2001 sales: 87,410,000 



*-*■-*••*•**** 



WATER DIVISION 

Timothy J. Henry, Manager 

A dry late summer and fall caused the department to impose 
water restrictions on October 2, 2001. Due to the continued 
dry spell, which was very unusual for this time of year, 
the department imposed a water ban on October 31, 2001. The 
dry conditions persisted through the end of the year and 
may have implications for the following summer in regards 
to limiting outdoor water use. 

The Massachusetts Dental Society recognized the Water 
Department for its efforts in optimizing fluoride levels in 
the public water supply for the third straight year. Joyce 
Kippen accepted the award on behalf of the Water Department 
at a Massachusetts Dental Society meeting. 

There was one (1) extension to the distribution system in 

2001. 

Kimball Ave. 450 feet of 8" CLDI pipe. 

2001 

Meters Replaced 250 



126 



Services Turned Off 80 

Services Turned On 69 

New Services 57 

Hydrants Installed 2 

Hydrants Replaced 9 
New Water Mains Installed (ft) 450 

Total Length of Mains (ft) 490,915 

Water Services 

Metered Services 4451 
Unmetered Services 57 Fire Lines 

Water Usage (Million Gallons) 

Reservoirs (Dow and Bull Brook) 205 
Brown' s Well 91 

Essex Road Well 27 

Fellows Road Well 40 

Mile Lane Well 39 

Winthrop Wells 23 

Total Water Usage (MG) 424 

WASTEWATER DIVISION 

John A. Quigley, Jr., Superintendent 

It has been a busy year for the employees due to being 
short handed. We look forward to this year with another 
person to share the load. We have received our new dump 
truck that replaced our 1975 Ford dump truck and hope that 
this one will last as long as the first one. 

We are awaiting delivery of a septage receiving unit that 
will keep out a lot of debris that comes in with the 
septage. Our grit chamber structure was painted which 
should extend the life of the unit. For our return sludge 
pump #3, we got a new gear box and variable speed drive and 
rebuilt the pump. Lastly, we replaced our oil fired boiler 
and burner which went on line in late September. With all 
this, it has been a very busy year. 

For the year 2001, we treated 286.291 million gallons of 

wastewater. 

We treated 1,814,400 gallons of septage. 

We processed 1,455 yards of Bio Solids 

We recorded 40.83 inches of rain. 



127 



The following violations occurred in 2001: 

MONTH # OF VIOLATIONS PARAMETER VIOLATED 



January 01 
August 01 

Solids 
October 01 
November 01 
December 01 



Fecal Coliform 

6 Fecal Coliform 

3 Effluent Settleable 

Copper 

Copper 

1 Fecal Coliform 

1 Copper 



******** 



FINANCE DIRECTORATE - Rita M. Negri, Finance Director 

ACCOUNTING OFFICE 

Rita M. Negri - Town Accountant 

The Town Accountant's Office consists of two full-time 
staff and a full-time Town Accountant who also serves as 
Finance Director. The Accounting Department is 
responsible for processing the payroll for all employees, 
processing invoices for vendor payments, and preparing all 
W-2's and 1099' s at year-end in accordance with IRS 
regulations . 

The Town Accountant's Office maintains all of the 
accounting records for the Town' s revenues and 
expenditures, ensures that reconciliations are performed 
between applicable Town departments, assists in providing 
information on benefits available to employees, and 
oversees the operation of the Town' s financial computer 
system. 

The Town Accountant also coordinates the annual independent 
audit of the Town's financial statements which was last 
completed by September 7, 2001, for the year ended June 30, 
2001. The financial results for fiscal year 2001 were good. 
This was due to good collections on receivables, and 
responsible spending of appropriations. 

Free Cash for fiscal year 2001 was certified by the 
Massachusetts Department of Revenue Division of Local 
Services in October 2001 in the amount of $986,270. 



128 



******** 



TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Virginia M. Cleary 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the collection 
j and investment of all Town revenue, approximately 
$37,491,262.73 per year, along with borrowing both long 
term funds and trust funds, tax title accounts, cash flow 
and reconciling monthly with the Town Accountant. The 
f office also handles all of the billing and data processing 
! involved with Real Estate, Personal Property, Motor Vehicle 
and Boat Excise. All receipts were deposited and 
faithfully recorded. 

; Even though fees were increased from $4.00 to $10.00, 6,339 
I beach stickers were issued throughout the year. 

A special thanks to the staff, Susan LeMieux, Carol Thurber 
and Corinna Warner for a job well done. Thanks also to Peg 
Whittier, tax program volunteer, for assisting us in 
issuing beach stickers. 

******** 

! ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of Real Estate and Personal Property 
January 1, 2001, was $1,556,219,428. 

The valuation of the Town by Class is: 

$ % 

Class 1 Residential 1,422,678,509 91.4189 

\ Class TL Open Space 

Class III Commercial 73,649,158 4.7326 

Class IV Industrial 45,298,820 2.9108 

Personal Property 14,592,941 0.9377 

Total: 100.00 

The Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 2002 was $11.54 per thousand 
for all property classes. 



129 



•A-******* 



TOWN CLERK & 

ELECTIONS ADMINISTRATOR 

Frances A. Richards, CMC 



It was another busy and exciting year for the Town Clerk's 



ith 



office this year. On June 14 and 15 all the town offices 
moved out of the old Town Hall on South Main Street into 
their new space in the renovated Whipple Middle School at 25 
Green Street. Our office is located on the first floor at 
the Green Street end of the building and includes a private 
office for the Town Clerk and a beautiful vault for the 
town's records. The old historic records are now properly 
stored in an environment controlled for temperature, humidity 
and light. We also have a storage space on the lower level 
for all the election supplies and equipment. 




Town Clerk Fran Richards in her new vault 



On June 1 



pth 



the offices opened for business at the new 



location and the unpacking went on for at least two weeks. 
The office is responsible for all the recording and 
certification of all official actions of the town, processing 
and issuing licenses and permits, conducting local and state 
elections and serving as a general information center to the 
public. The services and demands on the Town Clerk's office 
have doubled, yet staffing has remained the same as it was 
over twenty years ago. The staff consists of the Town Clerk 
and Assistant Town Clerk Elise "Lee" Graves. Outstanding 



130 



dedication and effort make it possible to run this office 
with two people. All of our data processing and printing is 
done in our office. We are unable to maintain the State 
computer system in our office due to lack of time and staff. 
The State Computer is only used to extract voter 
registrations from the Registry of Motor Vehicles and to 
communicate with city and town clerks throughout the 
Commonwealth. 

When the old town records were moved into the new vault, we 
started an Archives Project to identify, catalog and index 
the old paper documents that were filed away in boxes. We 
extend special thanks to John Winthrop of South Carolina, 
Robert and Carol Winthrop of Georgia and Angela Getchell of 
Hamilton for their donations for the Archives Project. 
Melanie Leary, an Ipswich resident and staff member at the 
Peabody Museum has offered to tackle this project and is 
currently helping us organize the old records that date back 
to the early 1700's. 

Also my sincere thanks to the volunteers who assisted me this 
year during the extremely busy periods: Isobel Coulombe, 
Moira McLaughlin, Peg Broekel, Cynthia Burns and Robert 
Stone. 

We are so happy to see this beautiful old building put to 
good use and hope all the residents come down to see the 
offices at the Town Hall; it will certainly bring back a lot 
of memories. (The Town Clerk attended High School in this 
building and graduated in 1953.) 

POPULATION STATISTICS FROM THE STREET LIST AS OF JUNE 1, 

2001 

TOTAL POPULATION 13, 348 

Ages - 4 731 

Ages 5 - 10 1,038 

Ages 11 - 13 538 

Ages 14 - 18 787 

Ages 19 - 25 908 

Ages 26 - 64 7,407 

Ages 65+ 1, 939 

Total number of households - 5,297 



Demographic Information for the Town of Ipswich from the 
Official Census 2000 provided by the U. S. Census Bureau 



131 



TOTAL POPULATION 12,987 

Under 5 years 744 
5 to 9 years 884 
10 to 14 years 872 
15 to 19 years 695 
20 to 24 years 447 
25 to 34 years 1,278 
35 to 44 years 2,393 
45 to 54 years 2,282 
55 to 59 years 783 
60 to 64 years 578 
65 to 74 years 1,008 
75 to 84 years 748 
85 yrs . & over 275 
Total Households - 5,290 

Family households (families) 3,462 
Non-family households 1,828 
Householder living alone 1,496 
Householder 65 years & over 619 
Average Household Size - 2.42 
Median Age (years) 41.7 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in the past three years 

1999 2000 2001 
Births 139 110 106 

Deaths 128 112 112 

Marriages 85 80 81 

There were 4 9 females and 57 males born to Ipswich 
residents in 2001. Of the total number of deaths recorded 
(67 females, 45 males), 104 were residents. Of the 81 
marriages recorded in Ipswich, 37 took place elsewhere; in 
9 marriages, one party was non-resident and in 25 
marriages, both parties were non-resident. 



Dog Licenses 1999 2000 2001 

Males 

Neutered Males 

Females 

Spayed Females 

A total of 1,756 dogs were licensed in Ipswich for 2001. The 
Dog Licensing Program that was adopted in 1993 continues to 
be very successful. We collected $2,070 in late fees from 
dog owners who failed to license their dogs in a timely 

132 



242 


228 


200 


659 


640 


618 


188 


153 


143 


761 


799 


795 



fashion. Animal Control Officers Harry Leno and Lisa Carey 
issued non-criminal citations to dog owners who failed to 
license their dogs or violated the animal control by-laws. 

My sincere thanks to Dr. Helen Noble, her staff and Animal 
Control Officer Harry Leno for conducting a Special Rabies 
Clinic at the Highway Garage on February 24th so dogs could 
get their rabies shots before the licensing deadline. The 
Annual Rabies Clinic was held May 2nd at the Highway Garage 
with Dr. Ken Carlson. 



1999 



2000 



SHELLFISH LICENSES & PERMITS 

Resident Yearly 
Resident Family 
Resident Commercial 
Over 60 Free Recreational 
Non-Resident Yearly 
Non-Resident Daily 
Eagle Hill Stickers 



REVENUE FROM SALES OF ALL SHELLFISH LICENSES $60,885.00 



2001 



84 


81 


77 


223 


171 


169 


153 


125 


120 


21 


9 


24 


122 


103 


87 


40 


27 


30 




4 






Sporting Licenses 



2001 



Resident Fishing 

Resident Fishing Handicapped (free 

Non-Resident Fishing 

Resident Hunting 

Non-Resident Hunting 

Resident Sporting 

Resident Sporting Over 70 (free) 

Archery Stamps 

Primitive Firearms Stamps 

Waterfowl Stamps 

Wildlands Conservation Stamps 

Total 



86 

12 

4 

66 

4 

57 

34 

61 

53 

66 

216 

659 



Revenue sent in to Division of Fisheries & Wildlife $7,640.50 



Revenue Report for the Town Clerk's Office 



2001 



Antiques & Old Metals Licenses $ 260.00 

Auction Permits 600 . 00 

Automatic Amusement Licenses 1,500.00 



133 



Beer & Wine Licenses 9,350.00 

Bowling Alley Licenses 80.00 

By-Laws, Maps Sold 1, 990 .00 

Class I Licenses 200.00 

Class II Licenses 1,300.00 

Class III Licenses 100.00 

Certified Copy Fees 3,910.80 

Common Victuallers Licenses 3,900.00 

Dog Fines 335.00 

Dog Licenses 19, 990.00 

Flammables Licenses 25.00 

Kayak License 100.00 

Liquor Licenses (All Alcoholic) 39,350.00 

Marriage Licenses 2,045.00 

One-Day All Alcoholic Licenses 760. 00 

One-Day Beer & Wine Licenses 80.00 

Raffle Permits 50.00 

Recording Fees 3, 513 . 00 

Seasonal All Alcoholic Licenses 5,175.00 

Shellfish Permits 60,885.00 

Shellfish Fines 600.00 

Sporting Licenses 7, 640.50 

Sporting Fees to the Town 160.90 

Street Lists Sold 1,464.00 

Sunday Entertainment Licenses 2,050.00 

Weekday Entertainment Licenses 1,100.00 

Total $168,514.20 



******** 



ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

Board of Registrars 

Phillip F. Grenier, Chairman 

Orville M. Giddings 

Robert M. Stone 

Frances A. Richards, Clerk 

DECENNIAL PRECINCT REDISTRICTING 

On June 11, 2001, the Board of Selectmen approved the plan 
presented by the Town Clerk for readjustment of precinct 
boundaries to comply with the +/-5% variance from the average 
population taken by the U.S. Census Bureau in the year 2000. 

PRECINCT POPULATION 



Precinct 


1 


3, 128 


Precinct 


2 


3,330 


Precinct 


3 


3, 175 



134 



Precinct 4 
Total 



3,354 
12,987 



2001 REDISTRICTING CHANGES 



PRECINCT 1 



None 



PRECINCT 2 

Brown Street, Cleveland Avenue #5 & #7, Cottage Street, 

Liberty Street, Linebrook Road #3-#14, Maple Avenue, Mineral 

Street, Pleasant Street #3 & #5 and Washington Street (odd 

#'s) #23-#69 & (even #'s) #54-#72 

PRECINCT 3 

Linebrook Road (odd #'s) #25-#499 & (even #'s) #306-#498, Old 

Right Road #3-#100 

PRECINCT 4 

Appleton Park, Emery Lane, Linebrook Road (even #'s) #28- 

#304, Old Right Road #2, Pine Street, Pineswamp Road, 

Pleasant Street #2, #4, #6-#31, Sand Pebble Drive, Washington 

Street (even #'s) #8-#52, #78 

REGISTERED VOTERS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2001 - 8,819 

Of the 561 new voters registered in 2001, 104 registrations 
were received by mail, 151 registered in the office, 4 at a 
state agency and 302 at the Registry of Motor Vehicles. 

PREC. DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN LIBERTARIAN GREEN UN-ENROLLED 



TOTAL 












1 456 


359 


10 


2 


1,214 


2,041 


2 507 


350 


5 


1 


1,458 


2,321 


3 319 


408 


12 





1,440 


2,179 


4 454 


342 


12 


2 


1,468 


2,278 


Totals 1,736 


1,459 


39 


5 


5,580 


8,819 



TOWN MEETINGS & ELECTIONS FOR 2001 

April 2, 2001 - Annual Town Meeting with 28 articles in 
the warrant - 570 voters attending 

April 10, 2001 - Annual Town Election with 1,943 votes 
cast-22.27% of the total voters (8,728) 

Oct. 15, 2001 - Special Town Meeting with 34 articles in 
the warrant - 16 articles voted on the 1 st night - 363 voters 
attending 



Oct. 16, 2001 



>nd 



2 night of the Special Town Meeting - 



meeting adjourned - no quorum 



135 



Oct. 23, 2001 - 3rd night of the Special Town Meeting - 
warrant completed - 252 voters attending 

Sincere thanks to the Board of Registrars, the Election 
Officials, Jim Graffum and the workers at the Cemetery 
Department, the staff at the YMCA, Cheryl Forster and the 
custodians at the High School/Middle School and my son Scott 
for all their help with the election at the YMCA and the town 
meetings at the Performing Arts Center. 

The following served as Election Officials 2001: Andrew 
Agapow, Bruce Bryant, Armand Brouillette, John Meers, Laurien 
Levesque, Charles McKenzie, Theresa Greaney, Dorothy 
Levesque, Mary Cunningham, Carolyn Navarro, Jane Janvrin, 
Ruth Paulitz, Virginia Player, Anne Matous, Diana Comeau, 
Cynthia Burns, Dorcas Rice, Marcia Inman, Irene Brouillette, 
Virginia Comeau, Isobel Coulombe, Moira McLaughlin, James 
Lahar, Nancy Damon, Margaret Broekel, Margaret Whittier, 
Jeanne Parker, Geraldine Heigh, Sandra Duke, Marlene Shannon 
and Lucille Dallas. 

******** 

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Greg Parachojuk, M.I.S. Director 

This year we moved into a new building and installed an 
entirely new high speed Local Area Network with Fiber 
backbone between floors, increased our Internet service 
from 56Kbps to 384Kbps, replaced our firewall, added 
limited VPN capabilities, and installed new Mail, Web, and 
File servers based on Windows 2000 technology. Several 
workstations were upgraded as well in preparation for the 
new financial system, which is going online in 2002. 
Preparation was a big part of us successfully making this 
move relatively painless. In addition, a new phone switch 
with Voice Mail capabilities were put online; and an 
Audio/Video media room was designed for direct broadcast of 
public information via local cable. 

Finally, work has begun on an all new town Web design, 
which is more intuitive to use while providing easier 
updating of content. Our goal is to provide the public with 
up-to-date information regarding meetings, contacts, forms, 
and a whole lot more. Come take a look at the following 
URL : www. town. ipswich.ma .us . 



136 



**-*•■*•■*■** + 



PURCHASING/BUDGET/RISK MANAGEMENT 

Jane H. Spellman, MCPPO 
Assistant Purchasing Agent 

The Purchasing Office employee oversees and monitors all 
Department procurements with the exception of the day to 
day expenditures of the Electric Department, and puts out 
to bid expenditures in excess of $25, 000 for goods and 
services and $10,000 for construction contracts for all 
departments except the School Department in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws. The Assistant Purchasing Agent 
became a Massachusetts Certified Public Purchasing Official 
(MCPPO) through attendance and successful completion of 
exams at three purchasing seminars sponsored by the 
Inspector General's Office as well as ongoing educational 
programs . 

In addition to present contract renewals, the following 
were advertised, put out to bid, bids received with 
contracts awarded: Circuit Breakers for Fowlers Lane, 
Office Furnishings for the new Town Hall, Van for Electric 
Department, Cleaning Browns Well, Moving Service to the 
Town Hall, CCTV System & Burglar Alarm for new Town Hall, 
Overhead Distribution Transformers, Internet Service, 
Cleaning Catch Basins, Fowlers Lane Substation Relay Panel, 
Study and Report on Great Neck Sewer, White Lion Site 
Demolition and Clearance, 4x4 Dump Truck w/Plow, Truck 
Chassis w/Plow and Spreader, Food Safety Consultant 
Renewal, Paint and Painting Street Lines, Reconstruction of 
Various Roads, Resurfacing Various Roads, Climate Control 
Systems for Library, Boiler Removal/Replacement at 
Wastewater Plant, Septage Receiving Station, Engineering 
Services No. Main Street Drainage, Planning Services for 
Public Safety Feasibility Study, Sewer Extension at White 
Lion Property, Consultant Services for Memorial Building, 
Sidewalk replacement at Hammatt Street, Brownville Avenue 
and various other streets, Planning Services for Neck 
Growth Study, Seawall Reconstruction on County Street, Snow 
Plow contracts, Municipal Software Systems, Van for 
Electric Department, Wastewater Environmental Impact Study, 
Software Services, Public Safety Staffing Study. 

The Purchasing Office oversaw all Workers Compensation 
long-term cases and reported all Town and School employee 
injuries. All property and casualty insurance claims 



137 



received were reported to the Town's insurance carrier. 
Insurance renewals were processed, policies received, and 
vehicle, equipment, and computer inventories maintained. 

The Purchasing Office was also responsible for copying, 
collating and distributing 25 budget copies while meeting 
the set deadline. The Town Manager did the editing himself 
this year. The Purchasing Office is grateful to him for 
that. Budget details with adopted figures for FY03 Budget 
will be inputted and distributed to Departments after the 
Annual Town Meeting. 

The Purchasing Office is also responsible for the 
compiling, editing, printing and distribution of this 
Annual Town Report. 



******** 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Victor Dyer, Director 

Collections : New books added: 2,938 (Adult & Young Adult) 
1,789 (Children). New media added: 467 (Adult & Young 
Adult) 285 (Children) . Large type, video and audio 
collections enhanced with funds provided by the Coburn 
Charitable Society and the Friends of the IPL. Children's 
music on CD is a new format added this year. 

Technology : We began training sessions for the public in 
the use of the new Horizon public access catalog. We also 
began offering weekly instruction sessions on basic 
Internet access. Enhancements to the catalog include e- 
mail notification of requests and the ability to place 
requests for materials from home PCs. Wilson Biographies 
Plus database was added to the other databases available 
for use from home or at the library. 

Staff : Paula Grillo was appointed Reference & Young Adult 
Librarian. New staff includes Louise Hamill, Gwendolyn 
Ambrefe and Leah Zaroulis in the Children's Department. 
Scott Clark was hired as a temporary custodian to fill in 
for Tom Geddis who was away on sick leave. Mary Lou Murphy 
was named Ipswich's first ^Employee of the Year'. 

Volunteers : This year Volunteers donated over 1,500 hours 
shelving books, preparing materials for circulation, 
creating databases, assisting with children's programs, 



138 



etc. Howard Fosdick created an Access file of Ipswich 
Chronicle obituaries from 1970-2001 and a database of 
information about early Ipswich houses. M.L. Scudder began 
work on copying and organizing newspaper files of Ipswich 
historical information. 

Board of Trustees : The Board approved a x Library Service 
Policy', ^General Library Objectives' and a revised x Rules 
of Conduct . ' 

Plan of Service : We continue to make progress on the goals 
and objectives of our x Plan of Service' . Some of the 
activities accomplished this year include staff training on 
listening skills and dealing with young adults, contacting 
all teachers in the public school system concerning class 
assignments, staff training on Excel and FrontPage 
software, weeding and new purchases in the areas of science 
and technology, new materials for young adults, publicizing 
library services and collections through four new brochures 
(General Library Information, Children's Services, Archives 
and Art in the Ipswich Public Library) . 

Friends : The Friends supported the library this year with 
funds for new materials and equipment, binding, and for 
children's craft supplies. The friends also purchased a 
handsome urn located near Children's Room entrance. 

Bequests & Gifts : Donations were received in memory of 
longtime library volunteer Myrtle Bohsen, Sarah Reynolds 
and Margaret Ann Miller. John Ennis donated a sourwood 
tree. A donation for the Markos Hellenic Fund was received 
from the Boston Foundation. The children of Hanford 
Thurber donated a table for the Archives Room. 

Programs : Children's Librarian Marilyn Pauley and Library 
Associate Maureen Fay continued to offer popular programs 
for children throughout the year. The 169 programs were run 
with 3,860 children participating. 

Circulation : Total circulation in 2001 was 118,271 items. 

Grants : Coburn Charitable Society awarded the library $3500 
for the purchase of large print books, videocassettes and 
audiocassettes . Work funded by the 2000 Customer Service 
grant completed in 2001 included a new design for the 
library's web page; production of four brochures; and 



139 



library business cards, library magnets, banners announcing 
library events, mounted library floor plans. 

Awards : The library was awarded a First Prize in the logo 
category at the Massachusetts Library Association Public 
Relations Awards ceremony in May. 




Building : Improved lighting installed in New Materials and 
Magazines sections; waterproofing completed on Main Street 
wall of Rogers Room; two oil paintings by Ipswich Artist 
Arthur Wesley Dow now hang in the Gaunt Reference Room on 
loan from the Ipswich School Committee; and eight oil 
paintings on loan from an anonymous donor are displayed in 
the Main Room and Rogers Room. 



******** 



IPSWICH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joan K. Arsenault, Chair 

Best regards from members of the School Committee! 

The school committee continues to focus on developing a 
budget that meets the educational needs of the children, 
working with the school building committee to complete the 
MS/HS building project, formulating a long term strategic 
plan, and working with the administrative team to improve 
MCAS scores. In addition, several new subcommittees have 
been formed to address educational issues: extended 
learning program, block scheduling, and district technology 
needs . 



140 



We continue to face fiscal challenges as the economy slows, 
state and federal resources are cut, and our enrollment 
grows. The staff and administration have been very 
aggressive in their pursuit of outside monies to support 
the educational needs of the children. Through the hard 
work of the staff /administration, the Ipswich School 
District benefits from approximately $700, 000 in combined 
State and Federal grant monies. 

As anticipated, our Middle School/High School population 
continues to grow. Enrollment has increased over 100 
students. The school district did receive notification of 
a growth grant from the state of $141,000. Once received, 
the money will be used to add much needed staff this 
current year (FY02) . Hopefully, we will continue to be 
able to fund these positions in FY03. 



VT 







We were very pleased with the most recent MCAS scores at 
the secondary schools. We average in the top 15% of the 
State. However, while we continue to be proud of these 
scores, we know there is still room for improvement. Our 
teachers and administrators continue to be committed to 
excellence and use the results to help guide changes and 
improvement in our curriculum. 

Recently we received over $200,000 from the Feoffees. As 
you are aware, the school district does not have a capital 
budget. Therefore any large ticket items must come from 
the operating budget, be bonded, or come from an override. 
Our schools have been recognized as leaders in the field of 
technology. Through your generous support of our new 



141 



MS/HS, we were able to acquire new technology at the 
secondary level. However, as budgets became tight we were 
not able to upgrade technology at the elementary schools. 
The School Committee has approved utilization of the 
Feoffees monies over the next three years for the upgrading 
of technology. We are currently looking at lease 
agreements that are very cost effective. 



The creation of a Buildings and Facilities Manager position 
shared between the town and schools has been crucial for 
the upkeep and maintenance of our buildings. With his 
input we are re-evaluating the structural needs at our 
Elementary Schools and determining the most cost effective 
way to handle any repairs. In addition, a long-range 
preventative plan for upkeep of the integrity of our 
buildings is underway. 

The School Committee meets regularly with Representative 
Brad Hill and Senator Bruce Tarr to advocate for 
educational needs. We have focused on state funding 
issues, the foundation budget formula, legislative changes 
in special education, and concerns/issues around the MCAS . 
Representative Hill and Senator Tarr continue to fight for 
the educational concerns of Ipswich, and we thank them for 
their hard work and effort. 

Probably the most frustrating issue for the School 
Committee is the finishing of the school building project. 
The School Committee continues to work closely with the 
School Building Committee for the opening of School Street. 
The fields are slated to be completed by spring. 

Lastly, we would like to thank all of you for your support. 
The Ipswich Schools could not have reached the level they 
are at without you. As our children move forward to meet 
the growing challenges in the world, it is comforting to 
know that they move forward with a sound educational base 
that you have helped to provide. We will continue to work 
hard for the children of Ipswich, and we look forward to 
your continued commitment and support to the Ipswich Public 
Schools . 



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******** 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Richard L. Korb 

I am happy to report that the state of the Ipswich Schools 
is excellent. Through the hard work of support staff, 
teachers, parents, students, School Committee and 
administrators, we have been able to maintain the highest 
level of quality education. 

The school year has been both eventful and successful. The 
goals that the School Committee and I set were reflective 
of the accomplishments we hoped to attain. Those were: 

• Develop a long-range technology enhancement and upgrade 
plan, beginning with our elementary schools, which will 
provide cyclical upgrades and improvements K-12. 

• Continue to implement and refine our curriculum 
improvement initiatives such as our Science Curriculum 
Study Committee, Curricular Template Development and 
FreshPond Mastery Models, with the goal of expanding the 
mastery models initiative to a broader base of the 
teaching staff K-12. 

• Work in conjunction with the School Committee to put our 
Strategic Planning Process back on tract, which will 
enable us to develop a 3-5 year District-Wide Improvement 
Plan. 

• Finalize the "Elementary Capital Improvement Project" 
process so that final cost estimates and scope of project 
can be submitted to the School Committee for review and 
consideration. 

• Continue to integrate such initiatives as "Emotional 
Intelligence and Responsive Classroom" across the K-12 
spectrum to promote a supportive and caring atmosphere 
within our district classrooms that enhances our theme of 
"Every Student Demonstrating Success," while at the same 
time improving student learning. 

• Work with the Ipswich Teachers Association to 
successfully implement our district wide teacher 
mentoring initiative with an emphasis on providing 
professional development opportunities and support for 
our new teachers. 

I am pleased to report that continuing progress is being 
made in all of the above areas. 



143 



The Superintendent/Citizens Roundtables continued this 
year, establishing lines of communication between myself 
and citizens in the community. In addition, I continued a 
schedule of visiting classrooms this year. 

Our staff continues to adopt the philosophy that we must 
always be on a track of continuous improvement. That 
attitude is reflective in the ongoing evaluation of 
programs that occur each year. 

Our Early Childhood "Birth to Age Three" Program has 
successfully been established within the community when we 
opened our new facilities in downtown Ipswich. This new 
center provides parent support services to any member of 
the community who requests them. 

This year, once again, our MCAS test scores placed us far 
above the State average in over 90% of the categories. Our 
Middle School and High School scores ranked up in the top 
20% of the State. We will continue to strive to improve 
our tests scores and have teams of professional educators 
in place analyzing test results and providing valuable 
analysis, which will lead to adjustments in our curriculum 
to assure our curriculum is aligned with the State 
Frameworks . 

The various subcommittees of the School Committee worked 
diligently in a number of areas from curriculum, policy 
development, technology, athletics and communications. 

The Ipswich School System is a leader across the nation in 
the area of technology integration across the curriculum. 
We are proud to feature numerous 21 st Century Classrooms 
within our school district that are designed to foster 
students who take responsibility for their own learning in 
an application-based environment committed to high 
expectations. Within this information-rich, technology- 
enhanced learning environment, the teacher creates a 
challenging project-centered, interdisciplinary classroom. 
The ultimate goal within the 21 st Century Classroom is that 
students will become self-directed learners who strive for 
continuous improvement through reflection and self- 
assessment; collaborative learners who take responsibility 
for their own role in a group; and proficient learners who 
design and present projects and apply the required 
knowledge appropriately. 



144 



The Ipswich Public Schools continue to be proud also of its 
many accomplishments this year. We continue to be 
recognized as a leader across the country in the area of 
educational technology. Our 21 st Century Classrooms and 
integration of technology into instruction continues to 
focus the spotlight of attention on our schools. 

In conclusion, I want to express my sincere appreciation to 
the citizens and parents of Ipswich who have given so 
generously in supporting quality education for all 
children. Support staff, teachers, administrators, 
parents, students and citizens working in partnership with 
each other will move this District forward in a culture of 
continuous improvement and excellence. 



•k'k-k-ir-k-k-k-k 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Barry Cahill, Principal 

Year two in our new Middle/High School Facility is 
underway. Although we await the completion of the work on 
the grounds and fields, the inside is fully finished. This 
facility continues to receive local, state and national 
acclaim as a building in which the structure reflects the 
instructional style and priorities. 

We are all looking forward to the completion of the new 
multi-purpose stadium, tennis courts and the reopening of 
the access road to School Street. Once this road opens, 
morning traffic delays on High Street should be drastically 
reduced. 

The 2001-2002 school year has brought changes to our 
school. Nine new teachers were hired in the summer to 
replace teachers who retired or moved to other systems. The 
quality and energy of these new teachers has been 
tremendous. Our academic program continues to be 
challenging and competitive. 

The Class of 2001 showed a superb college acceptance rate 
of 88%, some 80% of these to four year colleges. Bates 
College, Boston College, Skidmore College, the University 
of Pennsylvania and the University of Virginia are among 
the 111 colleges and universities that accepted our 
students in the Class of 2001. 



145 



Our MCAS scores, PSAT and SAT results continue to be 
strong. Our students are scoring at above average in all 
areas. Students who fail the MCAS yet need to pass as a 
graduation requirement are provided a strong tutorial 
assistance program. 

The Performing Arts Center continues to offer wonderful 
entertainment options for the community. The Moscow Boys 
Choir highlighted our fall program while "The Boys of the 
Lough" will provide entertainment for St. Patrick's Day. 
Our own drama program will host the State Drama Competition 
this year as we present "The Crucible". 







Community use of the building is a constant each week, 
arts and athletics communities are here on a weekly bas 
This is an exciting, bright and wonderful structure for 
students and the community. 



The 
is . 



146 




IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Cheryl Forster, Principal 

I am pleased to be reporting to the citizens of Ipswich in 
my seventh year as principal of this dynamic and exciting 
school. We are now in our second year in our new building, 
enjoying the warm learning environment we have created here 
together. The school design has allowed us to get to know 
our students very quickly, and each grade has developed its 
own culture creating three distinct neighborhoods. The 
facility has allowed students and teachers to access state 
of the art technology as well as world-class art, music, 
and drama programs. Our students continue to learn "new 
basics" along with the old ones, as we find that both are 
truly important in today's world of work. 

Educating students has never been more challenging with the 
added mandated testing we now administer in all grades. 
Test results we received validated the good work being done 
in our classrooms by our teachers. Mathematics scores in 
grade 8 were the ninth highest score in the state out of 
262 Middle Schools; and our Language Arts scores were well 
above state average with 71% of our students performing in 
the proficient and advanced ranges. The time we have 
spent teaching them to think and write is paying off. 

We are now in our fifth year of providing a no cost after 
school program for all interested students and their 
families. This program is now part of a three-tiered grant 
with the YMCA and the Ipswich Police Department. Students 



147 



may remain after school and receive help with homework and 
then go to the "Y" and take part in a variety of activities 
for the remainder of the afternoon. A Monday afternoon 
outdoor activity club was also created within the grant. 
Students learn orienteering, camping, fishing, outdoor 
survival skills and safety as they travel to local state 
parks and recreation areas. One of the highlights was a 
weekend overnight fly fishing trip to Vermont, which would 
meet the expectations of the most serious angler. 

Excellent middle schools strive to reach the all-important 
whole child. Each grade level specializes in exploratory 
and child centered topics that offer a variety of learning 
experiences and opportunities. At the Ipswich Middle 
School we work in a "team" approach. Teaching blocks are 
longer for in-depth learning; technology is readily 
available, and class size is limited for maximum skill 
building. It is a cooperative venture. 

Students in grade 6 spend an intensive and focused week in 
the fall at Nature's Classroom on Lake Ossipee in New 
Hampshire. All of our sixth grade staff attends to form 
close bonds with the students they will teach for the year. 
The outdoor curriculum is high interest, and many new 
friends and relationships are forged. 

Grade seven students spend four days in canoes on the 
Ipswich River, seeing first hand where their river begins 
and ends. They canoe through miles of forest, wetlands and 
marsh, collecting data all the way. They finish their trip 
paddling from the town wharf to arrive at Hog Island. 

Grade eight students have traditionally focused on 
government. Their culminating activity has been a weeklong 
trip to Washington, D.C. where they learned about the 
operation of our federal system and visit many famous 
landmarks and battlefields. They study the people and 
places which make this country great. 

We offer many enriching programs to meet the interests of 
all types of children. Our excellent Math league, 80 
members strong, ranks very high in state competition. Our 
drama, dance and music departments involve more than half 
of our student population. Student athletes participate in 
sports programs that teach skills, sportsmanship and 
wellness. We teach a course called "People Smarts" which 



148 



focuses on interpersonal skills and multiple intelligences. 
Learning about ourselves is an important lesson. 

We have been asked to speak at workshops for architects and 
educators all over the country with the new school design 
and success as the topic. We are proud to be part of such 
an innovative and exciting learning environment. Our 
outstanding professional faculty works diligently to 
clarify our vision for education— that every child can 
learn. We are constantly finding new ways to reach and 
teach all children who come to our school, and it is an 
exciting time to be working with young people. We love our 
work and invite you to join us. Ipswich should feel proud 
it supported this wonderful new facility to provide the 
best learning opportunities possible for our children. 




******** 



WINTHROP SCHOOL 

Carolyn Davis, Principal 

Winthrop School continues to be an energizing learning 
community where students, staff, and parents learn to 
become leaders who embrace change and find 
opportunities to shape the future. 

Our School Improvement Plan written by our School 
Council included the following goals: 

> Writing - to help students become proficient and 
fluent writers 



149 



> 21 st Century Classroom Model / MCAS Action Plan - to 
preserve the 21 st Century Classroom Model while 
including the MCAS Action Plan 

> Good News - to showcase, broadcast, and celebrate our 
students' accomplishments 

We focused on these goals and documented the many ways 
in which we have reached them. 

Annual school-wide topics have unified the school 
around the study of a common theme. This year our 
theme was "ENERGY" which focused on the energy we need 
to teach and learn as well as learning more about 
energy from a physical science point of view. Grade 
level ENERGY challenges resulted in projects displayed 
throughout the school. Students and teachers rose to 
meet these challenges with variety, creativity, and 
problem solving skills producing interesting and 
educational results. 

Students published their writing in the "Anthology of 
Poetry 2001", the Ipswich Chronicle, The Winthrop 
Incredible News, and many class newsletters. They sent 
hundreds of cards to senior citizens. Sixty students 
(this number has doubled since last year) were members 
of our Student Leadership Council setting leadership 
examples through worthwhile projects that improved our 
school in countless ways. 

Some examples of accomplishments from our graduating 
2001 class include: more writing and publishing than 
ever before, learning to work with and help 
Kindergarten partners, persevering through another 
round of the MCAS, entrepreneurial pursuits at the 
School Store, rock climbing as part of our science unit 
on force, becoming better researchers, designing simple 
machine inventions, creating a vernal pool calendar, 
understanding the value of friendship, taking advantage 
of opportunities to practice leadership skills and 
"hoping to make a positive effect on the world around 
us." 

Teachers continued to write and receive grants that 
benefit the school with new programs. Our 4 th grade team 
wrote a Department of Education Lighthouse grant called 
"Water, Water, Everywhere" to enhance their science 



150 




curriculum. Margaret Maderios wrote two grants enabling 
both elementary schools to implement a full-day 
kindergarten program for the first time. A Class Size 
Reduction grant allowed us to hire an additional 
teacher who increased student performance by reducing 
class size during academic times. Sheila Smith, a 4 th 
grade teacher received National Teacher Certification. 
Jennifer Adamo-Grenier, 3 rd grade teacher, received 
recognition as a PALMS Teacher Leader. Kathleen 
O'Reilly, 3 rd grade teacher, presented at the National 
Education Summit on technology. All our teachers 
dedicated countless hours above and beyond the school 
day to improve the curriculum and share successful 
instructional strategies. I am immensely proud of their 
commitment to the profession as well as the respect and 
nurturing attitude for their students. Ipswich is 
fortunate to have such exceptional professionals. 

The major contributions of The Friends of Winthrop and the 
Volunteers In School (VIS) program enhanced the quality of 
our school with generous donations of time and effort. 
Their fundraising projects supported our monthly special 
assemblies with outstanding cultural and educational 
programs, our playground, and after school programs. We 
are grateful to them for their relentless commitment and 
outpouring of energy. 

We wish to thank the Town of Ipswich for their ongoing 
partnership and support which enables the Winthrop 
School to be an energizing educational community with 
high expectations for students and staff. 



151 



******** 



PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D., Principal 

This was an excellent year for education at the Doyon 
School. The challenges of educating our youth for the 
future— with an ever-evolving prioritized curriculum 
of data, conceptual understandings and skills— remains 
a significant one; but as a look back at 2001 
demonstrates, this challenge can be met and overcome 
with collective focused and sustained efforts. 

Our faculty and curriculum meetings last year focused 
on supporting our vision statement, "Literacy for 
All-Math Matters — & Character Counts." The faculty 
was divided into three teams, each given the task of 
working on one of these areas and bringing 
suggestions back to the full staff. As part of our 
Literacy Team efforts, we were again able to offer 
Project Read phonology training to all instructional 
personnel who had not previously had the training; 
and for the first time all kindergarten students 
received a phonological screening so we could 
identify those who needed extra support and could 
intervene prior to grade one. We acquired new 
instructional resources in the language arts, 
including materials from the Write Source program for 
all grade levels, and the Language Arts Subject Area 
Committee finished the grade-by-grade curriculum so 
teachers could clearly see instructional priorities 
in both grammar writing. We also continued our 
twice-annual all-school open-ended writing prompt and 
scored it using the rubrics we developed last year. 
The year ended with a fun Stop and Write day during 
which everyone in the school stopped and engaged in a 
writing activity for a developmentally appropriate 
period of time. Our Math Matters efforts have led to 
a revision in the schedule at several grade levels to 
allow us to utilize the positions of Math Assistant 
and Class Size Reduction teacher (grant funded) to 
reduce math group sizes for more personalized 
instruction. We were also able to provide extensive 
training for all new staff in the use of our 
"Everyday Math" program. We were pleased with the 
results of our 2001 Math MCAS scores which saw a 
significant increase in the percent of our students 



152 



achieving in the top two score categories, as well as 
an 80% decrease in failures. 

The Character Counts team did extensive research into 
a variety of approaches schools have used to help 
students develop into fine people. We think this is 
just as important as helping them become accomplished 
learners . The Team's recommendation to the staff was 
that we become trained in a program called The 
Responsive Classroom. We decided the most economical 
way to provide the training was to bring the 
presenters to Ipswich; and 30 Doyon and Winthrop 
faculty and staff volunteered to come into the Doyon 
Library on a Saturday and receive the training. The 
program is now being implemented successfully in many 
classrooms, and additional training is planned. 

Last year was another successful one for the Friends 
of Doyon. The Friends raised over $25,000 and 
sponsored grade level and all-school programs in 
social studies, music, art history, literacy and 
science. The Friends are also helping us fund a 
boardwalk over a vernal pool in the Willowdale Forest 
(that we will use as part of a grade five science 
unit) , as well as a "revitalization" of our school 
library. The Harvest Fair celebration and the 
Doyonathon were highly successful; and more than 100 
Doyon parents and Ipswich community members 
volunteered their time in assisting in classrooms and 
the library, chaperoning trips, and helping with 
special programs and events such as the Handicapped 
Awareness grade-level programs, Kindergarten 
Screening, Whale Day, and Destination Imagination 
(with one of our DI teams winning the regional 
competition and going to the state finals!). Last 
year' s second annual "Moving On" celebration for 
grade five students was most successful and its 
success was due in large part to parental efforts and 
energies. For all of the above, Thank You, Parents! 

Other noteworthy educational events included 1) the 
first year of our Student Leadership Team in grades 
four and five— we couldn't be more proud of the 
students who participated; 2) the awarding of 
educational grants including those from the Mobile 
Corporation, the Ipswich Savings Bank Educational 
Foundation, as well the Department of Education; 3) 



153 



the first Full-Day Kindergarten program (made 
possible by DOE grant funding and the fabulous 
efforts on the part of the joint parent-faculty 
committee that organized the grant application) ; and 
4) successful recruiting efforts to bring top-quality 
educators to Doyon as several of our veteran staff 
retired . 

On this, the occasion of my fifteenth annual report, 
I would like to extend a special thanks to the 
incredibly dedicated and talented faculty and staff 
of the Doyon School with whom it is a pleasure to 
work, and to the community of Ipswich --your ongoing 
caring and support for the children of Ipswich is 
inspiring. Your efforts and contribution make it 
clear that "We are all in this together." 

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 

Diana W. Minton, Director 

The Ipswich Department of Special Services has been 
continuing to update practices to align with the federal 
and state mandates for special education programming and 
services. To that end, we have increased our capacities to 
include all students in programs here in Ipswich. 

The Ipswich Public Schools receives special education 
funding under the Federal IDEA Grant. This special funding 
allows the school district to raise the level of services 
provided to parents, students and teachers within the 
Ipswich Public Schools. The Grant requires an evaluation to 
guarantee the programs' compliance with both federal and 
state laws and regulations. This report indicated that we 
were in compliance with all applicable state and federal 
guidelines . 

Also, in the fall of 2001, the Massachusetts Department of 
Education did an on-site program review, which gave our 
district positive marks and stated, "You and your entire 
staff are to be congratulated for your efforts in 
implementing all necessary improvements." 

We have initiated and completed MCAS Alternative 
Assessments, clarified eligibility standards and instituted 



1 



154 



the use of all mandated forms. Our special education 
curriculum is based on the Massachusetts Frameworks. 



■k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k 



IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Robert Como, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority Board has contracted to have 
all 2 4 kitchens and bathrooms replaced at Southern Heights. 
The modernization work is in progress with a completion 
date of March. Additionally, Condition Assessment Report 
applications have been filed with the state requesting 
funding for new windows, roof shingle replacement and 
associated repairs at this development. 

The Agawam Village Condition Assessment Report application 
was also filed requesting additional funding to cover the 
replacement of prime windows and associated repair work. 

The I HA Board has issued bid solicitations for the complete 
painting of all interior hallways at Caroline Avenue and 
Agawam Village. The painting will be completed during this 
fiscal year. 

The new development for Special Needs is a work in progress 
on Essex Road. The bid documents are being assembled for 
publication. An April start date for construction on this 
four-unit group residence has been authorized by the IHA 
Board. 

The IHA Board has budgeted and authorized an extensive 
upgrade of the existing computer system. All desk 
terminals will be replaced with networked work stations and 
high speed Internet service. 

+ ******■*■ 

IPSWICH CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Elizabeth Loudon, Chair 

The Ipswich Cultural Council continued to disburse grant 
funds for a wide range of projects throughout 2001. In the 
fall, the Council met three times to review applications 
for FY 2002 funds. Applications were up considerably this 
year: we were asked for more than three times the amount 
($4,910) than we have to award. 



155 



Our other main activity was our annual Town Art Show. We 
had no Cultural Council grant money for this show this 
year. It is supported entirely by volunteer donations and 
an entry fee. We held it at Ebsco in the cafeteria and 
received over 100 art works to display for the weekend of 
September 14th through 16th. We also held a poetry reading 
that was well attended. The Show provided a calming respite 
at the end of a traumatic week; and we have plans to 
maintain and strengthen it in the coming years. 



******** 



OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Glenn Hazelton, Chair 

The Ipswich Open Space Committee (OSC) put most of its 
efforts in 2001 toward collecting information on the 
parcels included for consideration under the 2000 Open 
Space Bond, but also considering other valuable open space 
parcels in Town that were either considered for private 
sale or were being considered for development before the 
Planning Board or Conservation Commission. This will be an 
ongoing process for the OSC, as the parcels on the Bond 
list can be amended by Town Meeting vote. 




Scott Property on Mill Road 

The evaluation and prioritizing of "listed" parcels of 
undeveloped land in Ipswich was undertaken by the OSC in 
response to a request of the Selectmen for meaningful, 
comparative rankings that would help in their decisions on 



156 



protection of "listed" properties if and when opportunities 
arise. This effort involved the entire OSC and several 
other volunteers, working in teams, and was led by 
Committee Co-Chair Carl Nylen. The process turned out to be 
very complex and in the end required the committee to meet 
two or three times a month. The result was a report, 
supplemented by a map, which ranks the parcels on their 
individual and regional merits. 

During this process a very strong and positive working 
relationship was forged between the OSC and the Town's Open 
Space Bond Program Manger, Tracie Hines, who was hired in 
late 2000. The OSC collectively, and several members 
individually, have met with Tracie on numerous occasions to 
walk parcels, to identify the value and key features of 
those parcels, and to consider appropriate procedures for 
the Town relative to these parcels. The evaluation process 
that was used is being refined by the OSC as we gain 
experience. As a result of this process, it is very clear 
to us that the evaluation of parcels is very complex due to 
the varied combinations of subjective and objective 
features present on any piece of land. The OSC has 
developed significant information and expertise on land 
features, large open areas in Town, and key parcels for 
protection. 

We look forward in the coming year to continue our work in 
identifying and reviewing sale and development proposals on 
parcels in Ipswich with significant open space features. 
In addition to its continuing work on land protection, OSC 
members have accepted liaison roles to the various Town 
boards and commissions that have action responsibilities 
under the 2000 Open Space Plan. 

********* 

HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 

Terri Stephens, Stephanie Gaskins - Co-Chairs 

The Hall-Haskell House continues to be a center of 
activity. The year 2001 was no exception. The Visitor 
Center continues to attract tourists, and the art exhibits 
are well attended. 

Bill Nelson managed the Visitor Center, which was opened to 
tourists from May through December. A wonderful group of 
volunteers were available to greet and answer visitors' 



157 



questions. We thank all volunteers for their time and 
efforts. Approximately 7,000 people visited the center, 
which was down from last year. Inside storm windows were 
added to prevent heat loss, and the interior was also 
painted. 

Fifty artists displayed their work at the house; and this 
year the gallery was open for more than half a year. 
Artists are not charged for the space, but are asked to 
donate 20% of their sales to help defray basic costs. The 
gallery was open during the Christmas Walk, and the season 
itself proved to be successful. Inquiries for gallery 
space start occurring during the winter. The house 
continues to draw much interest from the community, and we 
ask that this committee be continued for another year. 



******•*•■*• 



BAY CIRCUIT TRAIL COMMITTEE 

Lawrence Eliot, Chair 

This year steps have been taken to complete a section of 
the Bay Circuit Trail by the Country Club. An agreement 
with the Country Club has removed obstacles for a trail. 
However, negotiations have just begun to obtain permission 
from the Conservation Commission to connect the Country 
Club portion of the trail with Willow State Forest and the 
Bay Circuit Trail. 

All of the Bay Circuit Guide to Walks in and Around Ipswl en 
have been sold. Delays in reprinting have occurred because 
of a new initiative to map all trails in town, because the 
plans for Turner Hill and New England Biolabs have not been 
finalized and because the Argilla Road Trail has had 
technical difficulties in mapping the proposed trail. When 
these projects are completed, they will be added to the 
Guide. A new printing has been delayed another year with 
actual printing time planned for Thanksgiving, in time for 
Christmas . 

A large number of new volunteers have allowed us to 
continued to monitor the Bay Circuit Trail and clean up 
after storms. Changes in the trail because of Beavers have 
been successfully implemented. The idea of developing a 
path along Argilla Road has continued to receive attention. 
Problems in adapting information received under last year's 



158 



grant to information on Town maps have delayed further 
development in creating a trail. 

Guided trail hikes have continued to be organized, 
advertised in the Chronicle and led by members of the 
Committee. These informal walking/hiking groups continue to 
meet at Town Wharf parking lot on Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. 
to explore local trails. 

CABLE EMERGENCY ROOM ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Mark Coltin, Chair 

This past year has been a very busy year for the Cable 
Emergency Room Advisory Committee. Early in the year, a 
representative of the Committee met with Senator Bruce 
Tarr, Representative Brad Hill, and Paul Jacobson, a Deputy 
Commissioner of the Department of Public Health (DPH) , to 
address rumors that there may be regulatory changes which 
could affect Cable. The Committee's Representative was 
informed that DPH was not taking any action which would 
adversely affect Cable. 

Notwithstanding those representations, by mid-Summer 2001, 
the President of Northeast Systems, Inc., which owns 
Beverly Hospital, was in communication with Town 
representatives informing them that there had been a change 
by DPH in regulations which would require Cable to be 
staffed by board certified emergency room physicians. This 
change in staffing could result in additional annual 
operating costs at Cable of approximately $750,000.00 per 
year of which Beverly Hospital would bear only $200,000.00. 
Hence, Beverly Hospital would seek to have the Town pay an 
approximately additional $550,000.00 annually. 
The Committee held meetings, and there were numerous 
negotiations and discussions with senior officials of 
Beverly Hospital to address these issues. 

During September 2001, a meeting was scheduled at the 
office of Senator Bruce Tarr at which certain of the 
Selectmen, representatives of the Committee and other Town 
officials met with representatives of Beverly Hospital, 
Senator Bruce Tarr, Representative Brad Hill and officials 
from DPH. At that meeting it was disclosed that while 
those regulations were not intended to apply to Cable, 
Cable was the only facility to which the regulations 



159 



applied. DPH indicated that it would look favorably upon 
an application for a waiver of those regulations by Beverly 
Hospital, but that it would have to be Beverly Hospital 
which applied for same. Beverly Hospital has taken the 
position that it would not apply for a waiver. 

In September of 2001, Beverly Hospital gave formal notice 
to the Town that under the existing contract between the 
Town and Beverly Hospital, Beverly Hospital expected the 
Town to pay the extra costs created by the new DPH 
regulations. In early October 2001, a meeting was held 
among Town officials and Beverly Hospital's senior 
officials to further discuss the issue; and Beverly 
Hospital remained steadfast in its refusal to apply for a 
waiver. 

The Town then commenced litigation against Beverly Hospital 
seeking to compel a waiver. Although the Judge rendered a 
Decision which did not require Beverly Hospital to apply 
for a waiver, the Judge's decision did say that in the 
pending arbitration matter that the arbitrator could take 
into consideration the fact that Beverly Hospital's failure 
to apply for a waiver may mean that expenses were not 
reasonably incurred. The arbitrator could determine that 
the Town may not be liable for the extra costs resulting 
from the regulations. Beverly Hospital has asked for 
reconsideration of that Decision and, as of this writing, 
no further decision has been made by the Judge. 
In the interim, the Selectmen sent to Governor Jane Swift a 
formal request that she intervene in this matter so that 
DPH regulations would not be applicable to Cable. As of 
this writing, no response had been received. 

Additionally, the October Town Meeting unanimously 
authorized the filing of legislation which would render the 
regulations non-applicable to Cable. Such legislation has 
been filed but as of this writing has not been yet acted 
upon. 

The Committee and Town officials continue to work toward 
attempting to keep Cable operating at present with the 
protection of the existing contract. 



160 



******** 

WATERWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Kenneth R. Spellman, Chair 

The Waterways Advisory Committee met several times during 
the 2001 calendar year in an attempt to obtain better 
services for the boaters of Ipswich. The 28 miles of 
coastline that Ipswich controls is one of the most pristine 
coastal areas in the Northeast. However, one of the 
ongoing issues is access. With limited parking at the 
Town's two main launching areas, as well as the Ipswich 
River's silting problem, the Committee has spent many hours 
seeking solutions to the access issue. 

A past Town Meeting vote initiated an application process, 
as well as several meetings with state and federal 
officials on the dredging issue. The process is slow and 
frustrating. However, the Committee is still pushing 
forward in an attempt to gain better access to Ipswich Bay. 

The Committee has also undergone a study of the mooring 
situation in Town waters and will continue this as a 
solution to the access issue. 

The pumpout boat program continues to be highly successful 
and has received many positive remarks from boaters, 
including members of the Ipswich Bay Yacht Club as well as 
the Ipswich Outboard Club. 

The Waterways Committee has found the Police Department to 
be providing an excellent blend of law enforcement, boating 
management, and public safety to the boaters of Ipswich 
Bay. We commend their efforts, and we will continue to 
work with them in attempting to address the needs of 
boaters in Ipswich. 

The Waterways Advisory Committee welcomes the input and 
views of the public and looks forward to hearing from you. 

******** 

TRUST FUND COMMISSION 

Edmund J. Michon, Jean Emerson, Robert K. Weatherall 

During 2001, the Commission held six meetings. Two 
scholarships, in the amount of $500 each, were awarded to 



161 



graduating seniors from Ipswich High School. Recipients 
plan to study at Northeastern University and Assumption 
College. Source of funds for these awards was the Thibeault 
Scholarship Fund, established by Dr. Cornelius Thibeault, a 
respected Ipswich veterinarian. Thus, his work lives after 
him and serves as example for us all. 

The principal theme of the Commission's work during 2001 
consisted of a comprehensive review of investment strategy 
for our funds, which for many years have been and currently 
are invested in one mutual fund, namely the Franklin Short- 
Intermediate US Government Securities Fund. The Commission 
believes this policy of investing exclusively in fixed 
income securities precludes growth of capital and thus 
fails to protect funds from the erosion of inflation. 
Working within limitations imposed by law, our objective is 
to fashion a policy that will combine safety of capital 
with reasonable income and long term growth. We believe the 
long-term perspective^ afforded by our funds makes 
achievement of such an objective imperative. 

Believing that professional investment management is 
essential to achieve our objective, we have received four 
competitive bids from local banks to provide such service. 
No selection has been made pending further study of 
services provided. Importantly, retention of investment 
counsel would reduce annual costs moderately from costs 
presently being incurred at Franklin Fund. 

Our Trust funds have aggregate market value of 
approximately $1 million in 23 separate accounts. Specific 
figures for each fund are provided elsewhere in this 
report/by the Town Treasurer. 

The chart provided below indicates results of investment in 
various categories of securities from 1925 - 2000. Value of 
equities is readily apparent. 



162 



$10,000 
$1,000 
$100 h 
$10 

$1 



Small-Cap Stocks 
Large-Cap Stocks 
Bonds 
Cash 
■ Inflation 



$0-^ — i — i — i — i — r 



$3,986.04 
$2,586.52 



^^ $48.59 

~~ .. $16.56 

^•l***""- — $972 



i — i — i — i — i — « — i — ■ — r""" 1 — j. • ■ 




g $ § i g i g g g g i § t § '■§ # #. # i 



The Commission cordially invites all taxpayers to attend 
our meetings. Dates are posted at Town Hall, or may be 
ascertained from any Commission member. 



*■*■****** 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990 

This notice is published pursuant to the requirements 
of the "Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990" as 
published in the Federal Register on July 26, 1991. 

The Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, advised the 
public, employees, and job applicants that no 
qualified individual with a disability shall, by 
reason of such disability, be excluded from 
participation in or be denied the benefits of the 
services, programs, activities, or employment 
opportunities in the Town of Ipswich, or be subjected 
to discrimination by the Town. A "qualified 
individual with a disability" means an individual with 
a disability who, with or without reasonable 
modifications to rules, policies, or practices, the 
removal of architectural, communication, or 
transportation barriers, or the provision of auxiliary 
aids and services, meets the essential eligibility 
requirements for the receipt of services, the 
participation in programs or activities, and access to 
job opportunities in the Town. 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following 
(person or office) as the contact to coordinate 



163 



efforts to comply with this requirement. Inquiries 
should be directed to: 

Name: Colleen E. Fermon 

Office: ADA Coordinator, Health Office 

Address: Town Hall, 25 Green Street 

Ipswich, MA 01938 
Phone Number: (978)356-6605 



Hours : 



00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Mondays 

00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs 

00 a.m. - 12:00 noon Fridays 



164 



TRUSTEES OF THE IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STATEMENT OF FUNDS ACTIVITY 

July 1, 2000 to June 30, 2001 



Operating Funds 






Balance - July 1 , 2QQ0 


$ 


42,413.83 


Interest/Dividends 


$ 


15,883.84 


Book Sales 


$ 


- 


Donations, Bequests, Grants 


$ 


4,761.00 


Books, Publications Purchased 


$ 


(7,292.65) 


Building & Grounds, Misc. Costs 


$ 


(665.57) 


Children's activities 


$ (11,613.06) 


Ipswich Speaks, tapes refreshed 


$ 


(1,077.03) 


Balance - June 30, 2001 


$ 


42,410.36 


Restricted Funds 






Ipswich Speaks Fund 






Balance -July 1,2000 


$ 


1,332.46 


Interest Income 


$ 


43.34 


Interest TXFR to Operating Funds 


$ 


(43.34) 


Balance - June 30, 2001 


$ 


1,332.46 


Markos Fund for Hellenic Culture 






Balance - July 1 , 2000 


$ 


1,854.13 


Interest Income 


$ 


59.22 


Interest TXFR to Operating Funds 


$ 


(59.22) 


Wm Markos new principal 9/26/00 


$ 


1,000.00 


Balance - June 30, 2001 


$ 


2,854.13 


Fidelity Mutual Fund 






Balance- July 1,2000 


$ 


3,120.21 


Interest Income 


$ 


146.17 


Balance - June 30, 2001 


$ 


3,266.38 


Library Trust Fund 






Balance - July 1 , 2000 


$ 


55,602.13 


Interest Income 


$ 


1,832.57 


Interest TXFR to Operating Funds 


$ 


(1,832.57) 


Balance - June 30, 2001 


$ 


55;602.13 


Helen St. John Fund 






Balance - July 1 , 2000 


$ 383,592.42 


Interest Income 


$ 


13,367.92 


Interest TXFR to Operating Funds 


$ (13,367.92) 


Balance - June 30, 2001 


$383,592.42 



165 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 
Balance on hand January 1, 2001 $42,548.76 

Income from funds for year 2001 as follows: 

Interest: Ipswich Co-operative Bank 

Term Deposit Certificates $ 2,061.02 

Expenditures for year 2001 as follows: 

Doyon School Computer with CD Rom Burner $ 2,223.12 

Balance on hand January 1, 2002 as follows: 

Ipswich Co-operative Bank 

Term Deposit Certificates $42,386.66 



Respectfully submitted, 
Burley Education Fund 



7 ?. Qaaw 

V. James DiFazio 




Treasurer 



/TTdUC 



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5,189,696 


4,982,552 


5,017,919 


652,136 


728,208 


755,996 


893,820 


593,352 


300,329 


608,928 


629,656 


605,924 



Ipswich Electric Department 

BALANCE SHEETS 

Years Ended December 3 1 

ASSETS 

Unaudited 
2001 2000 1999 

UTILITY PLANT - AT COST 

Plant in service $13,468,084 $12,631,004 $12,158,269 

Less accumulated depreciation 8.278.388 7.648.452 7.140.350 

Net utility plant in service 

DEPRECIATION FUND 

RATE STABILIZATION FUND 

OTHER ASSETS AND DEFERRED CHARGES 608,928 

CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash 

Operating fund 139,861 610,969 1,269,354 

Customer deposit fund 36,518 23,062 20,102 

Petty cash 300 1.275 1.275 

176,679 635,306 1,290,731 

Accounts receivable 

Customers 614,508 824,848 528,436 

Unbilled 883,478 906,595 

Other 6.159 -__ 646 

1,504,145 1,731,443 529,082 

Less allowance for doubtful accounts (75.000) (80.000 ) (50.000) 

1,429,145 1,651,443 479,082 

Materials, supplies and fuel oil inventory 208,940 216,617 141,469 

Prepaid expenses 



208,940 
142.447 


216,617 
27.172 


1.957.211 


2.530.538 


$9,301,791 


$9,464,306 



Total current assets 1.957.211 2.530.538 1.911.282 

8.591.450 



192 



UNAPPROPRIATED SURPLUS AND LIABILITIES 

UNAPPROPRIATED SURPLUS $6,163,668 $6,428,251 $6,398,592 

LONG-TERM DEBT 600,000 700,000 800,000 

DEFERRED LIABILITY 893,820 

CURRENT LIABILITIES 

Current portion of long-term debt 100,000 100,000 100,000 

Accounts payable 763,494 1,111,549 808,077 

Customer deposits 43,773 29,560 26,595 

Accrued liabilities 395,770 105,348 78,034 

Deferred revenue 341.266 989,598 380.152 

Total current liabilities 1.644.303 2.336.055 1.392.858 

COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES 

$9.301.791 $9.464.306 $8.591.450 



193 



Ipswich Electric Department 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 

Years ended December 3 1 

Unaudited 
2001 



Operating revenues 
Sales of electricity 
Residential 

Commercial and industrial 
Municipal and other authorities 
Outdoor lighting 

Other operating revenues 

Total operating revenues 

Operating expenses 
Purchased power 
Power production 
Distribution 

Customer accounts and service 
Administrative and general 
Depreciation 

Total operating expenses 

Earnings from operations 

Other income (expense) 
Interest income 
Interest expense 



Earnings before provision for 
Payment in lieu of taxes 

Provision for payment in lieu of taxes 

NET INCOME 



268,597 



38,717 

(39.225) 

(508) 



268,089 
(219.320) 
$48.769 



2000 



222,848 



61,439 
(44.136) 
17,303 



240,151 
(210.492) 
S 29.659 



1999 



$4,450,679 


$4,310,329 


$3,837,579 


4,234,486 


4,169,682 


3,817,589 


562,090 


467,114 


438,317 


29.620 


29.113 


27.937 


9,276,875 


8,976,238 


8,121,422 


430.553 


56,705 


29.899 


9,707,428 


9,032,943 


8,151,321 


6,738,809 


6,228,589 


5,366,507 


580,397 


572,659 


628,413 


501,978 


495,648 


498,370 


159,855 


196,960 


219,664 


826,244 


709,474 


710,414 


631.548 


606.765 


346.740 


9.438,831 


8.810.095 


7.770.108 



381,213 



52,356 
(30.566) 
21,790 



403,003 
(205.699) 
$ 197.304 



194 



NOTES 



Printed By: Flagship Press, North Andover, MA 
Compiled by: Jane H. Spellman 



353s. \D5 
*00 1 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 2122 00162 117 



THE TOWN OF IPSWICH AT YOUR SERVICE 
A handy Check-List of Often-Used Town Services 



Administration 

Town Manager 356-6609 

Accounting 

Finance Director 356-6601 

Ambulance 

Business 356-98 00 

Emergency 911 

Assessments 

Assessors 356-6603 

Building & Health 

Building Inspector 356-6605 

Code Enforcement 356-6605 

Gas Inspector 356-0523 

Health Agent 356-6605 

Plumbing Inspector 356-0523 

Business Association 356-4400 

Cable Emergency Center 356-4366 

Cable TV 356-3666 

Cemetery & Parks Dept. 

Office 356-6643 

Chamber of Commerce 356-3231 

Civil Defense 

Emergency Management 356-6645 

Conservation Commission 356-6661 

Council on Aging 356-6650 

Court 

Third District Court 356-2681 

Probation 356-0333 

Crane Beach 

Gate 356-4354 

Castle Hill 356-4351 

Dog Officer 

Dog Pound 356-6652 

Animal Control Of ficer. .. 356-4343 

Electric Department 

Office 356-6635 

Fire Department 

Business 356-4 321 

Emergency 911 

Fire Prevention 356-6631 

Harbormaster 356-4343 

Health Department 

Health Agent 356-6605 

Historical Society 

Curator-Whipple House. . . .356-2811 
Curator-Heard House 356-2641 

Housing Authority 

Office 356-2860 

Ipswich Chronicle 356-5141 

Library 356-6648 



Mosquito Control 

Essex County Office 474 

Parking Clerk 

Office-Monday 356 

Other 3 52 

Planning & Development 

Town Planner 356 

Planning Board 356 

Ipswich Partnership 356 

Conservation 3 56 

Police Department 

Animal Control 3 56 

Business 356 

Emergency 911 

Harbormaster 356 

Shellfish Dept 356 

Post Office gQQ 

Public Works Department 

Office 356 

Recycling 356 

Transfer Station 3 56 

Trash Collection 3 56 

Purchasing 

Ass't Purchasing Agent... 3 56 
Recreation Department 

Office 356 

Registry of Motor Vehicles. .. .762 
School Department 

Administration 356 

High School 

Connecting all Depts 356 

Doyon School .3 56 

High School 3 56 

Middle School 356 

Winthrop School 3 56 

Selectmen 

Office 356 

Sewer Treatment Plant 3 56 

Tax Collector 

Office 356 

Town Clerk 

Office 3 5 6- 

General Licenses 356- 

Treasurer/ Collector 

Office 356- 

Veteran's Services 

Veteran's Agent 3 56- 

Water Department 

Office 356- 

Water Treatment Plant 3 56- 

Vtsrters Center 356 



-4640 

-6611 

-8035 

-6607 
-6607 
-6161 
-6661 

-4343 
-4343 

-4343 
-4343 

r 275-g777 

-6612 
-6612 
-6653 
-6612 

-6608 

-6644 
-0025 

-2935 

-3137 
-5506 
-3137 
-3535 
-2976 

-6604 
-6642 

-6610 

-6600 
-6600 

-6610 

-3915 

6637 
6639 

8540